Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 28

Thread: A day in the AF you will never forget

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Charleston, SC
    Posts
    265
    Likes (Received)
    160
    Thanks (Received)
    20

    Default A day in the AF you will never forget

    Share one of the best days in the AF. Might have been during a deployment, TDY or home station. Okay...I go first.

    2006, 35,000 feet above sea level in the back of a C-17A. Headed back to the Died after a very long day to/from Incirlik AB, Turkey. Was on the ground for 90-minutes to off-load, get fuel, and upload cargo and then back to the Died. The other loadmaster was in the bunk getting some rest. It was his first overseas mission. Those young guys need a lot of sleep. Anyway...about 1 hour from the Deid we get a radio call to divert to Kuwait City and then press on to Ramstein. This would turn our duty day over the 24 hour mark and we needed a waiver to proceed. All crewmembers agree to take the mission. Our mission just changed to airlift fallen Warriors. Let the A1C sleep until we were about 10 minutes from landing. Informed him of new mission. Landed and offloaded cargo and cleaned up aircraft. About 30-minutes later we had the sad honor to load up 18 transfer cases. Last Warrior was loaded and we closed up back of aircraft. Took our time making sure each US Flag was perfectly placed over the 18 Warriors. The back of the C-17 is huge...but took on a different meaning when all was finished.

    We were back in the air. I asked the A1C how he was feeling? He looked me directly in the eyes and told me he was proud to be taking these Hero's one step closer back home to their families. This young man really understood how important our mission really is. You never know what your AF is going to ask you to do.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Wackland
    Posts
    742
    Likes (Received)
    78
    Thanks (Received)
    8

    Default Re: A day in the AF you will never forget

    In 2011 I was deployed to Afghanistan. During our first mission we searched some caves that were believed to be used by insurgents prior to attacking our MOB, my Military Working Dog and I went through the caves and cleared them with no issues. We then continued on down a footpath for roughly 800 meters before finally heading back to our waiting vehicles. Before we got into our vehicle I decided to give him the opportunity to take a break (i.e., piss) while he was doing his thing he showed a distinct change-of-behavior and began bracketing towards a n area our search wasn't focused on according to intel. I followed him and he made his way to a firing pit roughly 6' deep and 5'x7' in width and length. He pinpointed on the side of one of the walls and hastily buried in the wall were 9 mortar rounds, in the bottom of the pit were four rockets. The firing emplacement was only 400 meters from the perimeter! After the countless hours of training my MWD had his first real find, knowing that we managed to prevent a few rounds from heading towards the base was a wonderful feeling.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Southeast Base
    Posts
    669
    Likes (Received)
    64
    Thanks (Received)
    6

    Default Re: A day in the AF you will never forget

    My "there I was" moment was going through Kurdish refugee camps and Northern Iraq in 1991. There were hundreds of white tents erected across the terrain and the Kurdish kids would swarm our vehicles hoping to get snacks. We had collected all the unwanted stuff from our MREs for several weeks and were giving that stuff out. The simple stuff we took for granted like packs of M&Ms, tuna casserole (which I despised), the useless tiny toilet paper pack and even bottled water were received by them as if we had just gave them a million dollars. One instance where a young boy at the window of our Humvee pleading for me to give him a bottle of water has always stuck with me all these years. Kids about 11 years old smoking. Saddam portraits in the streets of Zahko riddled with bullet holes. Pesh Merga rebels strolling about with AKs. Blown up Iraqi vehicles and bridges. Swarms of Kurds on top of a garbage truck picking through the Coalition trash while it was trying to dump its load is still vivid. Coming across helmets, uniforms, RPGs, mortars, rounds, grenades and other ordnance at an abandon fortified hill overlooking into Turkey was interesting and a little scary. I remember being scared of booby traps and land mines there. All 22 years ago, and I still remember all of the images like yesterday.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Sooner Nation
    Posts
    743
    Likes (Received)
    133
    Thanks (Received)
    20

    Default Re: A day in the AF you will never forget

    One time my internet went down and the A/C failed in my office in the same day. Worst. day. ever.
    Quote Originally Posted by Capt Alfredo View Post
    Rules for the sake of rules makes for mindless policy and engenders a lack of respect for those who enact and enforce them.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    West Coast, USA
    Posts
    1,598
    Likes (Received)
    206
    Thanks (Received)
    32

    Default Re: A day in the AF you will never forget

    First tour in Korea, during the tree incident. We worked in a building festooned with antennas, surrounded by POL tanks, within spitting distance of the runway at Osan. Those days were the most scared I ever was in my life until October 21, 2009.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    7,517
    Likes (Received)
    479
    Thanks (Received)
    34

    Default Re: A day in the AF you will never forget

    The night in 1986 we launched F-111Fs to Libya. After 4 years of training for war I finally got to experience the AF mission for real.
    "Respect My Authoritah!" - Eric Cartman

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    SW. Michigan
    Posts
    214
    Likes (Received)
    44
    Thanks (Received)
    2

    Default Re: A day in the AF you will never forget

    As a young airman at Little Rock AFB AR, assigned to Base Honor Guard. Started out as a horable additional duty, but after a couple of them, crying my eyes out for a person I didn't know, it really became an "Honor" that I will not forget. You got a little tempered after a few, but damn it could be heartbreaking.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    DC
    Posts
    114
    Likes (Received)
    67
    Thanks (Received)
    5

    Default Re: A day in the AF you will never forget

    My first rescue. The guy coming up on the hoist had the look in his eye's that he had already said his prayer and was ready to die. Once he was in the aircraft and realized he was going to be ok his expression changed to pure joy. Not many jobs can you see the saddest person on the verge of death turn into the happiest person ready to live life in the matter of a few minutes.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Gym
    Posts
    526
    Likes (Received)
    19
    Thanks (Received)
    3

    Default Re: A day in the AF you will never forget

    The day my boss said "why don't you just stay at the gym during the inspection"

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Mars
    Posts
    1,028
    Likes (Received)
    262
    Thanks (Received)
    28

    Default Re: A day in the AF you will never forget

    I have a few.

    1) Deployed to Youpickastan, and got a call from our AES Chief (we were all geographically separated) that said we had an injured squadron member being flown in after a bad accident. I ran to the helipad and he was being offloaded. His buddy was covered in his blood, and this kid wasn't going to make it. I helped the medics take this kid to our surgical box so they could start working on him (bl: he didn't make it). His buddy though was zoned out, still standing on the helipad covered in blood. No one else around. I started to walk towards him as he started to walk towards the fence. Outside that fence was a well marked, uncleared mine field. Long story short it got to the point where I had to literally tackle this kid to the ground and restrain him. Combat Lifeskills (battlefield shrinks) eventually took him away and that was the end of that. Report to my chain and got on with my deployment. About a year after that deployment I got a FB msg from someone and it ended up being this kid that I tackled, thanking me for getting involved and stopping him from doing something he would have regretted. He was the proud father of a newborn that he named after me (middle name) and his lost buddy (first name).

    2) Had to visit a mall recruiter because my unit was doing some nonsense and I got tagged to assist. As I was leaving (wearing BDUs) there was a crowd of people and a few mall cops standing in a gaggle. I avoid gaggles, especially in uniform, so I was trying to walk past them when a mall cop ran over to me and asked if I would be willing to try to help. I asked what was wrong and there was a badly injured little girl that had trapped herself inside a vent and wouldn't come out for anyone. Her father was just acting like a real dick and screaming at her. As I am being pushed through the crowd cops showed up and got this asshole to shut up and step away. Girl wasn't coming out for the cops either and they were talking about getting fire dept to come out and cut her out. They walked me up to the vent and I just kneeled down and said "Hi". She asked if I was wearing a real military uniform and I said yes. She leaped out into my arms and asked me to not let him hurt her. Apparently jerk dad had smacked her around and then brought her to the mall and got mad at her again so she ran and went to hide and got stuck in that vent. That's all the cops and a dozen witnesses needed to hear (cops rushed him out of the area too...it was cartoonish comical how fast the crowd did a 180 from cheering at the girl to seething and marching towards the father). Anyways girl won't let go of my neck until mom (divorced, it was his week and hopefully his last) came to get her. Little girl kept calling me her hero. I didn't do squat, but she had seen enough news about military that she blew us all up into heroes. Made me feel like king for a day. Saw her and her mom again at the same mall a few months later and she recognized me (civilian clothes this time) and did the same five hour bear hug around my neck again. Kid should be in her later years of high school now. Hope she's doing well. She did more for me than I did for her.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •