2017 NDAA: http://docs.house.gov/billsthisweek/...HRPT-S2943.pdf

REPORTS ON A NEW SINGLE-SALARY PAY SYSTEM FOR MEMBERS OF THE ARMED FORCES (SEC 604) - Not later than March 1, 2017, the Secretary of Defense shall submit to the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of Representative a report that sets forth a plan to implement a new pay system. The new pay structure described shall assume the repeal of the basic allowance for housing and basic allowance subsistence for members of the Armed Forces in favor of a single-salary pay system.
And, if you search the document, here's what you find:

The new pay structure described pursuant to subsection (b)(1) shall assume the repeal of the basic allowance for housing and basic allowance subsistence for members of the Armed Forces in favor of a single-salary pay system, and shall include the following:

(1) A statement of pay comparability with the civilian sector adequate to effectively recruit and retain a high-quality All-Volunteer Force.

(2) The level of pay necessary by grade and years of service to meet pay comparability as described in paragraph (1) in order to recruit and retain a high-quality All-Volunteer Force.

(3) Necessary modifications to the military retirement system, including the retired pay multiplier, to ensure that members of the Armed Forces under the pay structure are situated similarly to where they would otherwise be under the military retirement system that will take effect on January 1, 2018, by reason part I of subtitle D of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 (Public Law 114–92; 129 Stat. 842), and the amendments made by that part.
Two concerns about this proposal:

1. Does not allow (as written) for locality differential. Incorporating BAH into basic pay without allowance for the differences in cost of living could do two things:
-if the amount incorporated is assumed at the amount of the areas of the country with the highest cost of living, that provides a surplus in lower cost of living areas.
-if the amount incorporated is below the amount needed to provide housing in those higher cost of living areas, that provides a burden on those stationed in those higher cost areas.

2. This plan removes a significant benefit to military compensation by adding taxable income to service members. In a median income area (Norfolk VA) ... an E-6 filing jointly is now on the cusp of the next higher tax bracket. Assuming he gets a bonus, sea pay, proficiency pay or his spouse has a job making more than $7,000 per year in taxable income, he moves from the 15% tax bracket into the 25% bracket. An E7 or O3 at 8 years moves into the next high bracket as well. This legislation has the effect (intended or not) of pushing almost anyone with over 12 years in the military into, or nearly into, the 25% tax bracket.