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Thread: NCAA Rules Prohibit Army Vet Because of Poor High School

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    NCAA Rules Prohibit Army Vet Because of Poor High School

    Washington Post: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/...ge-basketball/

    Isaiah Brock had big plans for 2016. After spending four years in the Army, the 22-year-old Baltimore native was invited to enroll at Oakland University and play on the school’s basketball team.

    “Yo mom,” he posted to his Facebook page Sept. 9 along with a picture of himself in OU’s uniform. “I made it!”

    Days earlier, the university had held a forum to welcome new student-athletes to Oakland. The school’s athletic director, Jeff Konya, had made sure to make special mention of Brock, who had earned a series of medals and honors during his service in Afghanistan and Kuwait.

    “He received a standing ovation,” Konya told the Detroit Free Press of Brock, whose basketball prowess was initially noticed in the Army’s charity tournaments. “It was a very powerful scene. At a time where the country has so many issues that need to be discussed, that showed that there is something to be said for service, giving of yourself and protecting freedom.”

    But while the university is ecstatic to have the decorated veteran on the squad, the NCAA is less so. Because of a below-average, five-year-old high school transcript, the NCAA has deemed Brock ineligible. The NCAA’s denial of Brock’s eligibility comes even as Brock managed A’s and B’s in online college classes he took last year.

    [So long horse masks. The NCAA once again is trying to kill a sport’s buzz.]

    “I don’t want to speak for the NCAA, but I think they put an emphasis on Isaiah Brock in 2011 and what his credentials at that time would suggest,” Konya told CBS Sports. “But Isaiah Brock in 2016 is a different person. He’s taken college classes and passed them with a 3.0. So if the issue is that he’s not prepared academically to do college work, I’d argue the proof is in the pudding.”

    Part of the reason the NCAA has ruled Brock ineligible isn’t even solely because of his high school grades (Brock averaged about a 2.0, according to the Detroit Free Press) but because of the state of the high school itself, CBS Sports reports.

    He attended Baltimore’s Forest Park High, which, according to U.S. News and World Report, scores just a six out of 100 possible points in its ability to prepare students for college-level academia. This means that even if Brock had graduated in the top 10 percent of his class, his “college readiness” could still fall short of the NCAA’s freshman-eligibility requirements.

    “The idea that he’d be judged from a college-readiness perspective based off of 5-year-old transcripts from a substandard high school is nonsensical,” CBS Sports’ Gary Parrish opined Wednesday.

    “[Brock] never even thought about getting eligible out of high school,” Oakland Coach Greg Kampe told CBS Sports. “He was always just going to join the Army.”

    And Brock flourished as a soldier in the 54th Quartermaster Mortuary Affairs Company, an assignment he recalls proudly.

    “When a solider dies on the battlefield, we’ll go retrieve them, and they’ll come to us,” Brock told the Free Press. “We’ll process their remains, search through their belongings, search through their body, annotate all their wounds and everything that happened. You see all the ramp ceremonies with the flag draped over their body? That’s what we do, then we send them home.”

    For his service, he won the Army Commendation Medal, a National Defense Service Medal, a Global War on Terrorism Medal, an Army Service Ribbon and a Certificate of Achievement, but still those awards, along with a qualifying standardized test score, have not persuaded the NCAA to look past the high school transcript.

    As it stands, Brock, who remains eligible for an OU scholarship, won’t be able to play on the team until next year.

    “They’re holding him out for an academic year of preparedness,” Konya told the Free Press. “In my limited scope of understanding, he’s proven he can do college work. So that rationale doesn’t seem to make a lot of sense.”

    So, OU said, it will appeal the ruling in the hopes that the NCAA, which as a policy does not publicly comment on individual cases, will apply for a waiver to allow the 6-foot-8 forward to play this season. The school hopes to settle the case by early November.

    “Isaiah went and fought so that organizations like the NCAA can exist, and he did so in a way that he’s now a decorated military veteran,” Konya told CBS Sports. “It’s a great story. And hopefully it has a happy ending. Hopefully common sense wins the day.”
    Less focusing on that fact that Mr. Brook is a vet, this exemplifies why I think education is important to break the cycle of poverty / low income living that plagues children raised in the inner city.

    While having the talent to earn an athletic scholarship, he went to a poor school which renders him ineligible to play for his first year. Some schools may opt out of recruiting folks in that situation; hence ... less of a chance to climb out of the situation.
    The most important six inches on the battlefield ... is between your ears.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mjölnir View Post
    Part of the reason the NCAA has ruled Brock ineligible isn’t even solely because of his high school grades (Brock averaged about a 2.0, according to the Detroit Free Press) but because of the state of the high school itself, CBS Sports reports.

    He attended Baltimore’s Forest Park High, which, according to U.S. News and World Report, scores just a six out of 100 possible points in its ability to prepare students for college-level academia. This means that even if Brock had graduated in the top 10 percent of his class, his “college readiness” could still fall short of the NCAA’s freshman-eligibility requirements.
    This is the bad part, though we see similar things in the military every single day when it comes to awards and decs. The best troop in a shitty shop is never going to win the award over the worst guy in the sexy shop. It's the way it is and it's wrong.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sandsjames View Post
    This is the bad part, though we see similar things in the military every single day when it comes to awards and decs. The best troop in a shitty shop is never going to win the award over the worst guy in the sexy shop. It's the way it is and it's wrong.
    Probably depends on where you are. The Senior Enlisted & CO should be cognizant of the folks who are in the un-sexy sections too ... I have seen it as you describe. More often than not have seen it not work out like that.

    For schools, the poor education at the foundation of one's life potentially sets up a lifetime and cycle of problems. There are exceptions ... but by and large this is a big issue ... not a simple fix, not a single fix to a multifaceted issue ... I think 'we' can do better.
    The most important six inches on the battlefield ... is between your ears.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sandsjames View Post
    This is the bad part, though we see similar things in the military every single day when it comes to awards and decs. The best troop in a shitty shop is never going to win the award over the worst guy in the sexy shop. It's the way it is and it's wrong.
    Very true. I have seen some people who busted butt on their NORMAL work, on occasion putting in 100s of hours of overtime (well technically overtime), making something so good, OTHER shops asked him or her for ideas to improve THEIR shops.. BUT cause of the time they spent, they had no time for education, volunteer service or command collateral duties.
    BUT someone who barely did the minimum for their work, but butt kissed enough to get as many collaterals, volunteer service etc, gets the Soy/SOQ, and other awards..

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    Quote Originally Posted by garhkal View Post
    Very true. I have seen some people who busted butt on their NORMAL work, on occasion putting in 100s of hours of overtime (well technically overtime), making something so good, OTHER shops asked him or her for ideas to improve THEIR shops.. BUT cause of the time they spent, they had no time for education, volunteer service or command collateral duties.
    BUT someone who barely did the minimum for their work, but butt kissed enough to get as many collaterals, volunteer service etc, gets the Soy/SOQ, and other awards..
    If true, that command had a pretty bad algorithm for how they boarded SoY/SoQ submissions. It doesn't matter how much soup you serve the homeless, if you aren't good at your job you aren't that good. I do say "if true" since I am at my 6th command in the Navy (and 13th overall) and really have never seen the collateral duty hounds who sucked at their jobs do better (boards, awards or promotions etc.) than those who were really good at their jobs.

    That said, in many cases it is about what the package says (weighing the packages as submitted vice personal perceptions of people) when it gets to the board; this is wickedly important ... as an XO, the Sailors I interact with most on a daily basis work in Admin. Pair that with nearly everyone submitted is good at their jobs ... so the whole person concept is in play.
    The most important six inches on the battlefield ... is between your ears.

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    Quote Originally Posted by garhkal View Post
    Very true. I have seen some people who busted butt on their NORMAL work, on occasion putting in 100s of hours of overtime (well technically overtime), making something so good, OTHER shops asked him or her for ideas to improve THEIR shops.. BUT cause of the time they spent, they had no time for education, volunteer service or command collateral duties.
    BUT someone who barely did the minimum for their work, but butt kissed enough to get as many collaterals, volunteer service etc, gets the Soy/SOQ, and other awards..
    Wasn't really the point I was making. Was talking more about jobs like EOD and Fire Department, simply because of the nature of their job, not having to do as much to be recognized as those in the low profile AFSCs (like plumbers, etc).

    Not saying that anybody is kissing ass, just relating awards to the NCAA feeling that, because the school he attended is a crappy school that it's immediately assumed that he's not capable, even though he proved otherwise several times.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mjölnir View Post
    If true, that command had a pretty bad algorithm for how they boarded SoY/SoQ submissions. It doesn't matter how much soup you serve the homeless, if you aren't good at your job you aren't that good. I do say "if true" since I am at my 6th command in the Navy (and 13th overall) and really have never seen the collateral duty hounds who sucked at their jobs do better (boards, awards or promotions etc.) than those who were really good at their jobs.

    That said, in many cases it is about what the package says (weighing the packages as submitted vice personal perceptions of people) when it gets to the board; this is wickedly important ... as an XO, the Sailors I interact with most on a daily basis work in Admin. Pair that with nearly everyone submitted is good at their jobs ... so the whole person concept is in play.
    Kind of off topic, but did you ever poll/survey your guys about their feelings of anonymity with the surveys?

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    Quote Originally Posted by sandsjames View Post
    Kind of off topic, but did you ever poll/survey your guys about their feelings of anonymity with the surveys?
    Yeah. Highly favorable results that the Sailors feel the results are truly anonymous.
    The most important six inches on the battlefield ... is between your ears.

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    Much ado about nothing. He can take a redshirt. Still practices with the team this year & has 4 years of eligibility left afterwards.

    If he plays his cards right he can graduate with a masters.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sandsjames View Post
    Wasn't really the point I was making. Was talking more about jobs like EOD and Fire Department, simply because of the nature of their job, not having to do as much to be recognized as those in the low profile AFSCs (like plumbers, etc).

    Not saying that anybody is kissing ass, just relating awards to the NCAA feeling that, because the school he attended is a crappy school that it's immediately assumed that he's not capable, even though he proved otherwise several times.
    Kind of like in an infantry battalion. Admin, supply, IT etc. are low profile and not the mission of the battalion, but you could not function without them. Have to keep them in mind for recognition and awards.
    The most important six inches on the battlefield ... is between your ears.

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