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Thread: Ammo Troop Calls it Quits at 14 Years (viral letter)

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by FLAPS, USAF (ret) View Post
    I lost count of the number of 50 and older vets with 10 or more years of service who admit regretting getting out short of retirement. Six more years looks like eternity, but seems like only minutes after the fact.
    I could see, those at 10 to 14, but the ones who make me laugh are those who do it after 17 yrs..!>!>

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    Quote Originally Posted by garhkal View Post
    I could see, those at 10 to 14, but the ones who make me laugh are those who do it after 17 yrs..!>!>
    I met a depot worker who was one of those guys. Admitted he got voluntarily out at 17 years because the AF was "screwing him." I asked, "oh, you got one of those early retirement deals?" He's says, "nope, Eff the AF." Then I asked, "well, at least you finished your time in the Reserves or ANG, right?" His reply, "nope." At that moment, I was thinking that his has to be the #1 idiot on the face of the Earth. He got out of the AF because he had a chip on his shoulder. I'll show the AF...I'll just LEAVE! Yeah! Eff them!

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    Senior Member Rainmaker's Avatar
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    If you could quit the Military and come back the next day, Rainmaker would've done it at least 20 times!

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    Senior Member Bos Mutus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FLAPS, USAF (ret) View Post
    I met a depot worker who was one of those guys. Admitted he got voluntarily out at 17 years because the AF was "screwing him." I asked, "oh, you got one of those early retirement deals?" He's says, "nope, Eff the AF." Then I asked, "well, at least you finished your time in the Reserves or ANG, right?" His reply, "nope." At that moment, I was thinking that his has to be the #1 idiot on the face of the Earth. He got out of the AF because he had a chip on his shoulder. I'll show the AF...I'll just LEAVE! Yeah! Eff them!
    I had a buddy who got out at 18 years...he was a TSgt, hadn't been married long and had a brand new baby, but just recently had a heart attack.

    I think the heart attack kind of put things in a different light for him and their deal was getting home to be close with family, have their baby around Grandma and Grandpa who were getting old, etc...they just really really wanted to be with family after his heart attack and decided two years was too much time to waste.

    It was a lot to give up...but hard to call someone foolish for just thinking there are things money can't buy....not sure if he got in the Reserves or something later...

    I never got back in touch with him, but I imagined once he fully recovered and lived another 40 years that he'd regret not doing that last 2...but, you never know, if he had another and died 3 years later we'd say he was smart for spending that 3 years where he wanted to be.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bos Mutus View Post
    I had a buddy who got out at 18 years...he was a TSgt, hadn't been married long and had a brand new baby, but just recently had a heart attack.

    I think the heart attack kind of put things in a different light for him and their deal was getting home to be close with family, have their baby around Grandma and Grandpa who were getting old, etc...they just really really wanted to be with family after his heart attack and decided two years was too much time to waste.

    It was a lot to give up...but hard to call someone foolish for just thinking there are things money can't buy....not sure if he got in the Reserves or something later...

    I never got back in touch with him, but I imagined once he fully recovered and lived another 40 years that he'd regret not doing that last 2...but, you never know, if he had another and died 3 years later we'd say he was smart for spending that 3 years where he wanted to be.
    Wow! He had a heart attack and couldn't get a medical retirement? Hopefully he is at least getting disability.

  6. #26
    Senior Member Bos Mutus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TSat75 View Post
    Wow! He had a heart attack and couldn't get a medical retirement?
    He did not.

    The MEB process never makes sense...I think that's in their mission statement.

    Hopefully he is at least getting disability.
    I didn't keep in touch with him...but I'd assume he got some disability.
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  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bos Mutus View Post
    I had a buddy who got out at 18 years...he was a TSgt, hadn't been married long and had a brand new baby, but just recently had a heart attack.

    I think the heart attack kind of put things in a different light for him and their deal was getting home to be close with family, have their baby around Grandma and Grandpa who were getting old, etc...they just really really wanted to be with family after his heart attack and decided two years was too much time to waste.

    It was a lot to give up...but hard to call someone foolish for just thinking there are things money can't buy....not sure if he got in the Reserves or something later...

    I never got back in touch with him, but I imagined once he fully recovered and lived another 40 years that he'd regret not doing that last 2...but, you never know, if he had another and died 3 years later we'd say he was smart for spending that 3 years where he wanted to be.
    I know it's not the same for everyone, but I've managed to get my total annual cost of living to less than half of my retirement. I never have to work again because of my military retirement, so I can't fathom any decision to forego that kind of security and peace of mind, especially when you are within arms reach of it. Even if your retirement only covers your mortgage, I still can't imagine walking away from that.

  8. #28
    Senior Member Bos Mutus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FLAPS, USAF (ret) View Post
    I know it's not the same for everyone, but I've managed to get my total annual cost of living to less than half of my retirement. I never have to work again because of my military retirement, so I can't fathom any decision to forego that kind of security and peace of mind, especially when you are within arms reach of it. Even if your retirement only covers your mortgage, I still can't imagine walking away from that.
    I'm with you. Although, I don't know how you got your cost of living down that low...I can't see that from here.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bos Mutus View Post
    I'm with you. Although, I don't know how you got your cost of living down that low...I can't see that from here.
    If you can find a place to live where you don't need a car, that gets it down a lot!

    At least, if you can get by with driving only a few miles per month. You can slash what you pay in insurance and gas.

    Transportation is usually an easy expense to trim when you get older.
    All behold that fancy strutting peacock, the bake sale diva...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bos Mutus View Post
    I'm with you. Although, I don't know how you got your cost of living down that low...I can't see that from here.
    $3,600 net income, no kids, no debt, mortgage paid off. My monthly bills, plus what I put aside to pay all insurance, property tax, etc come to about $1,700 monthly. On top of that, my wife has a career.

    Life is good
    Last edited by FLAPS, USAF (ret); 08-06-2015 at 05:10 PM.

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