Page 5 of 5 FirstFirst ... 345
Results 41 to 48 of 48

Thread: Windows 10

  1. #41
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    965
    Mentioned
    6 Post(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by garhkal View Post
    When a company says "we just got this newer product out, less than a year after the last one, its better so we just won't bother supporting it any more' that to be is covert coercion to FORCE you into buying/getting the new product.

    What ever happened to keeping something till it wore out?
    Again you don't seem have any understanding about what the word Covert means. there is nothing covert happening here it is all in the open


    . the sold a faulty product and are now replacing that product with a better one. Microsoft will let you keep your POS operating system if you choose to do so, but you can't expect them to pay the support costs for the very few that chose to do so. They are supporting 7, 8.0 and 8.1 users by offering the a fix, if you choose not to accept that fix is is your problem not theirs.

    What about keeping things until they wore out, If that was the case many of US would be using 8-bit MS_DOS machines running MS-dos 3.1 or so. There is no waste to replacing software we will not be running out of ones and zeros any time soon. Even the electricity involved in the upgrade would probably not round up to a nickle.
    Last edited by MikeKerriii; 08-09-2015 at 07:05 PM.

  2. #42
    Administrator UncaRastus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2000
    Location
    MTF-HQ
    Posts
    1,196
    Mentioned
    9 Post(s)
    Blog Entries
    3
    garhkal,

    The first day that I tried to use 8 and 8.1, my patience was worn out. It's not really like it's a 10, it's like 8.2 on nice steroids. Or maybe an 8.9 with a extra shot of user friendliness.

    8 was bad. 8.1 was a bit better. Still not that user friendly. 10 is 8 + what it should have been in the first place.

  3. #43
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    124
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by garhkal View Post
    What ever happened to keeping something till it wore out?
    Back in the old days, people didn't BUY a software license, they leased it. Microsoft has been quite clear they want to return to that model.

    Under that model, when your software provider had a release patch, you HAD to accept and install the patch when they told you to, unless you paid them extra for custom support in order to allow you to make the decisions about when your applications could survive the patch. If there was an experimental patch, you could choose to test it or not. Sound familiar?

    Purchased licenses solved a couple of issues that aren't really problems for Microsoft at this point. Inability to track all of their customers (when the company was basically two guys selling punched tape copies of a language compiler), which is a hard requirement if you are going to impose patches on them. Lack of an accounts receivable process, which is a hard requirement if you're going to be billing people on a recurring basis. Today's resistance to the old model is far more customer based, as the customers have developed this pesky notion that they OWN their copy of the software . . ..

    There's nothing new under the sun, right? Old mainframe software was the first ransom-ware, since if you failed to renew your leased license, it stopped working. Your business got to deal with the cost of losing access to the software (even the mainframe OS) if you didn't pay the annual ransom, err, licensing fees.
    Back from the bit bucket. Somebody flushed the buffers on me, though . . ..

  4. #44
    Administrator UncaRastus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2000
    Location
    MTF-HQ
    Posts
    1,196
    Mentioned
    9 Post(s)
    Blog Entries
    3
    hustonj,

    Thank you very much! At last, you have explained that which I had largely ignored, probably because if there is a bunch of legalistic terms, I, like so many, go to the bottom of that, and click accept.

    Now, you seem to be computer savvy, much more than most. Have you switched to 10? If so, have you found any problems with 10 programming?

    If not, if you will, what prompted you not to grab onto your nose and step off of the high dive board, to download Windows 10?

    And to the rest of the members (Rainmaker, et al.), there is a way of getting something to not have the spying eyes on their computer, using the new Windows 10. Different ways, but go to Google, type in Windows 10 disable spying. Then do what you want to do.

    This is one of the sites:

    http://www.cinemablend.com/games/How...You-75467.html

  5. #45
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    965
    Mentioned
    6 Post(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by hustonj View Post
    Back in the old days, people didn't BUY a software license, they leased it. Microsoft has been quite clear they want to return to that model.

    Under that model, when your software provider had a release patch, you HAD to accept and install the patch when they told you to, unless you paid them extra for custom support in order to allow you to make the decisions about when your applications could survive the patch. If there was an experimental patch, you could choose to test it or not. Sound familiar?

    Purchased licenses solved a couple of issues that aren't really problems for Microsoft at this point. Inability to track all of their customers (when the company was basically two guys selling punched tape copies of a language compiler), which is a hard requirement if you are going to impose patches on them. Lack of an accounts receivable process, which is a hard requirement if you're going to be billing people on a recurring basis. Today's resistance to the old model is far more customer based, as the customers have developed this pesky notion that they OWN their copy of the software . . ..

    There's nothing new under the sun, right? Old mainframe software was the first ransom-ware, since if you failed to renew your leased license, it stopped working. Your business got to deal with the cost of losing access to the software (even the mainframe OS) if you didn't pay the annual ransom, err, licensing fees.

    You have never been able to buy more than a license to use for any Microsoft OS.

  6. #46
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Columbus, ohio
    Posts
    3,328
    Mentioned
    29 Post(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by MikeKerriii View Post
    Again you don't seem have any understanding about what the word Covert means. there is nothing covert happening here it is all in the open
    Overt then...


    Quote Originally Posted by MikeKerriii View Post
    the sold a faulty product and are now replacing that product with a better one. Microsoft will let you keep your POS operating system if you choose to do so, but you can't expect them to pay the support costs for the very few that chose to do so. They are supporting 7, 8.0 and 8.1 users by offering the a fix, if you choose not to accept that fix is is your problem not theirs.
    With all the privacy setting chop ups i see mentioned about elsewhere, i will gladly stay with 8.1 Though i would have preferred to keep XP (at least IT recognizes most of the games i have)..

  7. #47
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    124
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by MikeKerriii View Post
    You have never been able to buy more than a license to use for any Microsoft OS.
    Where did I claim otherwise? Where I said the customer base had developed this notion that . . ? That's not a claim otherwise. It is a reflection of the difference between common perceptions and reality.
    Back from the bit bucket. Somebody flushed the buffers on me, though . . ..

  8. #48
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    124
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by UncaRastus View Post
    Now, you seem to be computer savvy, much more than most. Have you switched to 10?
    Nope. The only reason I have to switch from 7 is as other software that I want to use becomes available in versions that don't support 7 anymore, and the old versions go unsupported. Since my box is basically towards the end of expected life already, I'll end up switching when I buy a replacement, to whichever is available (and compatible with the other software I want to run).

    I don't like being the product to be sold. I'll avoid becoming the product while I can, and will minimize my footprint as product once I fall into the trap. Ain't nuthin' free.
    Back from the bit bucket. Somebody flushed the buffers on me, though . . ..

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •