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Thread: Joining the Air Force at 17

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    Joining the Air Force at 17

    Lets say someone joins the air force at 17 with parental consent, and they originally signed for 4 years.

    Can that 17 year old change the term of enlistment 6 years the day before he goes to BMT without parental consent? Or is parental consent needed to make an amendment and make it 6 years?

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    Senior Member Rusty Jones's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dberns View Post
    Lets say someone joins the air force at 17 with parental consent, and they originally signed for 4 years.

    Can that 17 year old change the term of enlistment 6 years the day before he goes to BMT without parental consent? Or is parental consent needed to make an amendment and make it 6 years?
    Yes, they can change it without parental consent. The parental consent is simply for you to join the military. It has no further stipulations. When I was a MEPS Classifier, we used to reclassify people all the time into five and six year programs.
    "Well... Uber's going to "driverless" cars soon, and their research probably shows that they're a natural fit (when it comes to getting paid for doing nothing)."
    -Rainmaker, referencing black males

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    Senior Member Absinthe Anecdote's Avatar
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    Do everything you can to go to college first, if you have exhausted all the possibilities and can't make college happen, then consider joining the military.

    If you don't have the grades, go to a community college for two years then transfer to a state school. Go talk to an advisor at your local school if you don't know how to make it happen.

    Maybe you can get into an ROTC program to help pay for school? Have you explored all your options?

    Right now you have something extremely valuable, your youth! Don't squander it because it won't last long.

    The only reason I can think of that would make sense for a 17 year old to join the military would be to escape a horrible/abusive home life and a crime ridden neighborhood.

    Unless your situation is extremely desperate, try to make college work first.

    Explain to us why going into the military for a six year tour is such a good idea.
    All behold that fancy strutting peacock, the bake sale diva...

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    Banned sandsjames's Avatar
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    Do not attend college first. Let the Air Force pay for it. It makes no sense to take the college rout, and waste your money, as it will do nothing for you unless you plan on becoming an officer. There's really no difference between the 4 and 6 years except you may get to join at a slightly higher rank, though you won't really see a difference in money or responsibility.

    I commend you for wanting to serve your country at such a young age. It's a great career path (despite all the little things that will irritate you for most of your career). Don't let anyone talk you out of it unless it's not something you really want to do.

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    Senior Member Rainmaker's Avatar
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    Unless you have a scholarship (or parents made out of money). I'd recommend the military route.

    The idea that everybody should go to college comes from arrogant, big government, academic leftists, and corrupt, greedy banksters that need to make you a debt slave, chained to a cubicle for the rest of your life.

    The majority of kids that start college, immediately after High school end up dropping out anyway AND they're usually significantly in debt!

    It's not really a college education anyway. It's a college indoctrination. But, If college is your thing. You can easily finish an AA in that first enlistment and get out and go to school on your GI bill. You'll be done with a Bachelors by 24 or 25 (which is the norm nowadays anyway).

    By the way. Try to pick a useful skill. If you can't find anything useful, I'd Choose Intel analysis. After you ETS, You can always get work as an incompetent and overweight support contractor or permanent, useless, government deadbeat for some bloated government agency (Just because of your clearance).

    Best of luck with your future and Aim High!
    Last edited by Rainmaker; 12-30-2014 at 06:00 PM.

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    Senior Member Stalwart's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Absinthe Anecdote View Post
    Explain to us why going into the military for a six year tour is such a good idea.
    Some jobs do require a 6-year initial obligation -- long initial training pipleines etc.
    The most important six inches on the battlefield is between your ears.

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    Senior Member Rusty Jones's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stalwart View Post
    Some jobs do require a 6-year initial obligation -- long initial training pipleines etc.
    I was going to say this earlier.

    To the OP: to piggyback, switching from 4 to 6 isn't that simple. Factors involved are bonuses and the particular AFS.

    I'm am Air Force Reservist and prior active Navy, so I couldn't tell you how it works exactly for active duty Air Force.

    Having been a Navy classifier, I can only speak on what I know from that: most jobs are four year contract. Some are five year. If there is a bonus for the job, and you accept it, it requires you to add on another year.

    Six year jobs fall under either the Advanced Electronics Field (AEF) or Advanced Technical Field (ATF). They may or may not come with a bonus, but are 6 years regardless - no extension required, and turning down the bonus does not reduce the contract. Benefits of AEF and ATF are advanced schooling and automatic promotion to E4 once time in rate eligibility are met.

    Highly likely that the Air Force doesn't have such a program, since promotion to E4 in the Air Force is automatic for everyone after time in grade eligibility is met.

    To sign up for six years, you'd need a five-year AFSC that offers a bonus. Mind you, I'm just going off of how I understand it works in the Navy. I'm sure that there has to be someone here who worked recruiting or classification for active duty Air Force that can give you the best possible answer.
    "Well... Uber's going to "driverless" cars soon, and their research probably shows that they're a natural fit (when it comes to getting paid for doing nothing)."
    -Rainmaker, referencing black males

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    Senior Member Absinthe Anecdote's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stalwart View Post
    Some jobs do require a 6-year initial obligation -- long initial training pipleines etc.
    I was just trying to get the kid to think about what he is doing; he will be 23 by the time he gets out.

    In my opinion, a person has a better chance of making more money in their late 20s and 30s if they get their bachelors degree knocked out right after high school.

    Putting off going to college isn't a wise move, so many doors are closed to you when you don't have that degree.

    I realize that not everyone can go to college straight out of high school.

    I went straight into the Air Force after high school, and I don't have any doubts that I would have made a hell of a lot more money, and worked better jobs throughout my 20s and 30s if I had went to college instead.

    Going to college part-time while on active duty takes a long time, and might not even be possible if he is working rotating shifts. Plus, he won't be able to enroll in classes until he completes 5 level, depending on the job he gets that could be 2 years after he joins.

    If he can make college work now, that is the better move by a long shot.
    All behold that fancy strutting peacock, the bake sale diva...

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    Senior Member Rusty Jones's Avatar
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    Oh, and to add on to what SJ and Rainmaker said: get as many CLEP/DSST exams knocked out while you're on active duty, in addition to taking courses. Use that post 9/11 GI Bill when you get out.

    Oh, and don't get married. Don't get married, and don't knock any women up. The temptation to get out of the dorms is going to be there, but eff that. Do your four and GET OUT. Never, NEVER put yourself in a position where you NEED the military. Least of all, more than the military needs YOU. Always have one foot out the door.
    "Well... Uber's going to "driverless" cars soon, and their research probably shows that they're a natural fit (when it comes to getting paid for doing nothing)."
    -Rainmaker, referencing black males

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    Senior Member Rusty Jones's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Absinthe Anecdote View Post
    Going to college part-time while on active duty takes a long time, and might not even be possible if he is working rotating shifts. Plus, he won't be able to enroll in classes until he completes 5 level, depending on the job he gets that could be 2 years after he joins.
    He can still take CLEP and DSST exams during those two years. Most four year colleges only have a 30 credit residency requirement. I CLEP'd and DSST'd half way through my bachelor's degree, and in under less than a year. I could have done more if I didn't already have 30 under my belt before I started taking the exams.
    "Well... Uber's going to "driverless" cars soon, and their research probably shows that they're a natural fit (when it comes to getting paid for doing nothing)."
    -Rainmaker, referencing black males

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