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Thread: Prepper tips

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    Prepper tips

    Since the Ebola thread in "hot news", has gotten onto the subject of disaster preps and good ideas, i thought it was high time we had a thread devoted to it.

    Here are some from that thread.
    Quote Originally Posted by efmbman View Post
    How about a flashlight/lantern that does not require batteries? Get some of those little landscaping solar lights. They charge up by day, and will glow all night.
    Quote Originally Posted by efmbman View Post
    Think practical and simple. Little things like saving dryer lint so that you have a good supply of tinder for fire-starting should it become necessary. Each trip to the local warehouse store, pick up a case of 20 oz water bottles (it's like $7 for 24 bottles). Shelf like in a dark, cool area is about 3 years for that. Before you know it, you have a large supply of water.
    Quote Originally Posted by Mjölnir View Post
    Vaseline lights even in a heavy rain.

    Can also roll a couple of sheets of newspaper into a long tube, tie every two inches with string or twine, cut between the strings and dip the pieces into paraffin wax. Those make really good starters that will catch by the flame of a match or lighter.
    Quote Originally Posted by efmbman View Post
    Good ones. A little twist I do: I cover cotton balls in petroleum jelly and store them in an old Altoids tin. As you said, the jelly makes them waterproof and the tin keeps them from drying out. Small enough to put in a pocket for hiking / camping.

    Doritos are a good fire starter, too.
    A few i have heard of in the past.
    1) If you see in store ads for sya by 5 for the price of 4, or 10 for 10 deals, get them and pack away 2-3 of each.
    2) Toilet rolls. Stock up on them as they are good items for trade. Same with jars of honey.
    3) Don't store batteries in a cool/cold place as this will drain them faster.

    So let's see if we can get up to 100 tips!

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    Senior Member Stalwart's Avatar
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    4) When building a shelter, consider the 5 W's:

    Water -- proximity to a source of drinking water and where water will flow when it rains.
    Wood -- Ready supply of shelter building materials and fuel.
    Weather -- try to find natural protection from wind / rain.
    Wigglies -- don't build a shelter on top of an ant colony or snake burrow.
    Widow Makers -- Look overhead for things that will fall and kill you.

    5) Remember the Rule of 3's:

    You can survive for 3 hours without shelter in bad WX, 3 days without water, 3 weeks without food. I have also heard 3 minutes without air and 3 months without some kind of social interaction before you go crazy.

    6) Myth: Moss grows on the north side of trees -- FALSE. Moss spreads via spores not seeds & spores don’t survive in dry areas. The sun shines from the south in the northern hemisphere, so a tree’s north side is generally more shaded and damp. In a thick forest though ... moss grows everywhere.

    7) Practice basic hygiene. A minor cut can get infected, then you are screwed. Brush your teeth, women need to mind menstrual care, avoid poison ivy etc., shaving can get your cut -- skip it, trim your nails to avoid ingrown nails (you can file them down with rocks -- seriously), bathe when you can ... in moving/non-stagnant water if possible.
    Last edited by Stalwart; 10-19-2014 at 11:17 AM.
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    Administrator UncaRastus's Avatar
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    Stalwart,

    Seeing as how you went through SERE and Advanced SERE , you probably have an expanded Go Bag packed, as a result of forward thinking, based in part on your training.

    Could you please give us a heads up on what you pack for 'Bug Out Time'? It would help the rest of us to become better prepared.
    Last edited by UncaRastus; 10-19-2014 at 02:21 PM.

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    Banned sandsjames's Avatar
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    Tip 1: Stock up on tin-foil. You must always have enough to replace your hat.

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    Senior Member Stalwart's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by UncaRastus View Post
    Stalwart,

    Seeing as how you went through SERE and Advanced SERE , you probably have an expanded Go Bag packed, as a result of forward thinking, based in part on your training.

    Could you please give us a heads up on what you pack for 'Bug Out Time'? It would help the rest of us to become better prepared.
    I am more prepared for bad WX than the end of society so I don't so much have a bug-out or go bag. I am pretty comfortable outside and in the woods for long periods of time though, after living in Idaho for 18 months have been known to keep a bag with the following in my vehicle in winter as well as one of my backpacks that usually has:

    sleeping bag & bivvy sack
    rain poncho
    knife & sharpening stone
    fire starting kit (matches, flint, dryer lint/cotton balls etc)
    map of the area & compass
    whistle (sometimes you may want to be found y'know)
    flashlight & extra batteries.
    16 or 24oz oz metal cup (when I go 'minimalist camping' I cook in it and eat right out of it)
    water bottle
    approx 100' of parachute cord (rope)
    5 or 6 small tent pins

    No need for tents or too much gear. I can build my own shelter or sleep in the bag inside the bivvy sack and be fine in most storms. When I was flying (riding) in the EP-3, I pretty much had all of this packed into my survival vest & bag, along with some field stripped MRE's. It would be enough to get me through a couple of days.

    We live on 6 acres in Maryland and get hurricanes and some bad WX in the winter sometimes (our area is really rural so we may not get plowed out for several days in winter). The previous owner had a 500 gallon propane tank in the back part of the property with a line that ran all the way to the house (that tank was 3/4 full when we bought the house). We are on well water so last year I got a basic load (2k watt) propane powered generator and had an electrical contractor redo the home panel (not too expensive) to allow me to run just the well pump, wall outlet that powers the fridge and another outlet in the attached garage where we have a spare fridge & freezer with the generator. I would not run the generator full time but could run it for an hour a couple times a day to keep food from spoiling and to fill water containers for several weeks with the fuel I have on hand If I cut the 2 wall outlets out of the loop I could probably go a 3-4 months of running the pump long enough to get 10 gallons of water once a day.

    **as an aside, I can use the 500 gal tank to fill smaller bottles to use in the outdoor kitchen I am building by the pool.
    Last edited by Stalwart; 10-19-2014 at 03:16 PM.
    The most important six inches on the battlefield is between your ears.

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    Senior Member Absinthe Anecdote's Avatar
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    I keep a Rambo knife and Army Field Manual 21-76 in my go-bag, but I don't really need a go-bag.

    I can kill a whole platoon of Spetsnaz infiltrators with one of those stubby pencils that you keep score with in golf.

    If one must insist on packing a go-bag, I say that tinfoil is much more important.

    It keeps your sandwiches safe from microbes, enzymes, mold and oxidation.
    Not to mention, fungal rot and bacterial formation.

    Plus, use it as a lining in your hat, in case an alien is inclined,
    to probe your butt, or read your mind.

    Now, if an alien does manage to probe your butt, the important thing to remember is to not react violently. They have you out matched with superior technology.

    Just go back to your amphibious assault ship, and take about a half dozen hot showers.
    All behold that fancy strutting peacock, the bake sale diva...

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    Senior Member Stalwart's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Absinthe Anecdote View Post
    I keep a Rambo knife and Army Field Manual 21-76 in my go-bag, but I don't really need a go-bag.

    I can kill a whole platoon of Spetsnaz infiltrators with one of those stubby pencils that you keep score with in golf.

    If one must insist on packing a go-bag, I say that tinfoil is much more important.

    It keeps your sandwiches safe from microbes, enzymes, mold and oxidation.
    Not to mention, fungal rot and bacterial formation.

    Plus, use it as a lining in your hat, in case an alien is inclined,
    to probe your butt, or read your mind.

    Now, if an alien does manage to probe your butt, the important thing to remember is to not react violently. They have you out matched with superior technology.

    Just go back to your amphibious assault ship, and take about a half dozen hot showers.
    I personally am more worried about inclement weather than Ebola or the collapse of our society -- at least right now. June of 2102 had an extended power outage down here in our area (11 days) and many people were really up a creek (mostly lost food in the fridge etc). In Jan right after we got back from China with our daughter the heat pump died and it was a few days before we could get it replaced. It got cold in the house, the fire place in the family room kept the room toasty but that was it. If we had no fireplace and it was just me I would just get under blankets etc. but a wife and new kid make me want to be be a bit more prepared for emergency than just 'gutting through it'.
    The most important six inches on the battlefield is between your ears.

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    Senior Member Absinthe Anecdote's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stalwart View Post
    I personally am more worried about inclement weather than Ebola or the collapse of our society -- at least right now. June of 2102 had an extended power outage down here in our area (11 days) and many people were really up a creek (mostly lost food in the fridge etc). In Jan right after we got back from China with our daughter the heat pump died and it was a few days before we could get it replaced. It got cold in the house, the fire place in the family room kept the room toasty but that was it. If we had no fireplace and it was just me I would just get under blankets etc. but a wife and new kid make me want to be be a bit more prepared for emergency than just 'gutting through it'.
    It isn't silly to be prepared for natural disasters, and power disruptions.

    I really do have a copy of FM 21-76 on my bookcase, and have even tried out my skills at primitive fire making before. When my sons were younger, they thought going camping and improvising a shelter was a lot of fun.

    Nothing wrong with survival knowledge, skills, and forward thinking.

    However, the title of this thread, "Prepper Tips" just invites me to lampoon the subject. Plus, the OP was talking about stockpiling dryer lint to build fires?

    LOL!

    Sorry, but I can't resist.
    All behold that fancy strutting peacock, the bake sale diva...

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    Senior Member Stalwart's Avatar
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    Fair enough.

    I do the same with dryer lint for fire-starting, even for our fireplace ... I also keep a lot of mailer ads to use as fireplace fuel too.

    As far as general survival skills, check out the Boulder Outdoor Survival School:

    www.boss-inc.com

    I attended their 28-day field course about 9 years ago, better survival training than anything I have gotten in the military.
    The most important six inches on the battlefield is between your ears.

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    Senior Member USN - Retired's Avatar
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    Preppers (and others) might enjoy watching the DVD video "Alone in the Wilderness". That video is available on amazon.com.

    Here's the synopsis of the video:

    "Alone in the Wilderness" is the story of Dick Proenneke. To live in a pristine land unchanged by man... to roam a wilderness through which few other humans have passed... to choose an idyllic site, cut trees and build a log cabin... to be a self-sufficient craftsman, making what is needed from materials available... to be not at odds with the world, but content with one's own thoughts and company... Thousands have had such dreams, but Dick Proenneke lived them. He found a place, built a cabin, and stayed to become part of the country. This video "Alone in the Wilderness" is a simple account of the day-to-day explorations and activities he carried out alone, and the constant chain of nature's events that kept him company.
    As Libertarians, we seek a world of liberty; a world in which all individuals are sovereign over their own lives and no one is forced to sacrifice his or her values for the benefit of others

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