Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 19

Thread: Yet more floods, but still some areas in droughts.. Why can't they pipe/ship it?

Hybrid View

Previous Post Previous Post   Next Post Next Post
  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Columbus, ohio
    Posts
    3,328
    Mentioned
    29 Post(s)

    Yet more floods, but still some areas in droughts.. Why can't they pipe/ship it?

    One thing i have always wondered is we have areas of the country (west coast, New mexico etc) with long lasting droughts, but we have other areas continually getting flooded out.
    Being both cases cost money to resolve, wouldn't it make more sense to put that money to better use, like building a series of big pipes to take the water from the flooded areas, and pump it to those under drought conditions? Or if piping is unfeasable, how's about use those tanker trains to ship it over.

  2. #2
    Banned sandsjames's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    6,984
    Mentioned
    18 Post(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by garhkal View Post
    One thing i have always wondered is we have areas of the country (west coast, New mexico etc) with long lasting droughts, but we have other areas continually getting flooded out.
    Being both cases cost money to resolve, wouldn't it make more sense to put that money to better use, like building a series of big pipes to take the water from the flooded areas, and pump it to those under drought conditions? Or if piping is unfeasable, how's about use those tanker trains to ship it over.
    This can cause issues. I'm sure there's someway to make it work, but what I do know from being raised in Northern California is that a high percentage of our water was piped to SoCal. What this meant is that, even though we lived in an areas with plenty of rain and plenty of water, we still were on water restrictions most of the time.

    There have been many discussions about NorCal becoming it's own state and this is one of the biggest reasons for that.

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Opt out
    Posts
    2,285
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by sandsjames View Post
    This can cause issues. I'm sure there's someway to make it work, but what I do know from being raised in Northern California is that a high percentage of our water was piped to SoCal. What this meant is that, even though we lived in an areas with plenty of rain and plenty of water, we still were on water restrictions most of the time.

    There have been many discussions about NorCal becoming it's own state and this is one of the biggest reasons for that.
    Hey California...you are right next to a huge ocean...why don't you get better at desalination?

  4. #4
    Banned sandsjames's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    6,984
    Mentioned
    18 Post(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Measure Man View Post
    Hey California...you are right next to a huge ocean...why don't you get better at desalination?
    Please refrain from lumping California together as a whole. We have no water problems in Northern California (and when I say Northern I'm referring to north of Sacramento).

    And, to be fair, we live 7 hours from the ocean.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Opt out
    Posts
    2,285
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by sandsjames View Post
    Please refrain from lumping California together as a whole. We have no water problems in Northern California (and when I say Northern I'm referring to north of Sacramento).

    And, to be fair, we live 7 hours from the ocean.
    Yes...good point. I know there is a desalination plant in Santa Barbara that is not being used. It was built during a drought in the 90s I think...but, then allowed to deteriorate unused while the area had rain.

    They are now considering firing it back up, but the cost to get it back up and running is almost as much as it was to build it because it's been allowed to go to hell...so they're basically hoping the El Nino that is predicted for this year will bring more rain.

  6. #6
    Banned sandsjames's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    6,984
    Mentioned
    18 Post(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Measure Man View Post
    Yes...good point. I know there is a desalination plant in Santa Barbara that is not being used. It was built during a drought in the 90s I think...but, then allowed to deteriorate unused while the area had rain.

    They are now considering firing it back up, but the cost to get it back up and running is almost as much as it was to build it because it's been allowed to go to hell...so they're basically hoping the El Nino that is predicted for this year will bring more rain.
    They always predict El Nino...

    There are also issues with environmental factors effecting the sea life and the emmisions created by the plants. You'd think that on a planet that is 80% water we'd be good to go.

  7. #7
    Senior Member CYBERFX1024's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Pasadena, California
    Posts
    615
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Measure Man View Post
    Yes...good point. I know there is a desalination plant in Santa Barbara that is not being used. It was built during a drought in the 90s I think...but, then allowed to deteriorate unused while the area had rain.
    They are now considering firing it back up, but the cost to get it back up and running is almost as much as it was to build it because it's been allowed to go to hell...so they're basically hoping the El Nino that is predicted for this year will bring more rain.
    They built one down in San Diego as well and will fire it up within the next couple of years. You live in Santa Barbara county right? The whole of SoCal is in need of alot of water right now. I routinely go up to the Central Valley and there are alot of farms hurting because of this.
    Also one of the guys I talk to at the gym goes is a hay broker. Basically he goes around California and buys large amounts of Hay to resell it. He has told me that farmers he has talked to are resulting to actually trying to dig wells to get more water.

  8. #8
    Senior Member efmbman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    1,042
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by sandsjames View Post
    ...even though we lived in an areas with plenty of rain and plenty of water, we still were on water restrictions most of the time.
    An anology is hidden in there somewhere... resisting the urge.

  9. #9
    Senior Member BENDER56's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    At the beach, out of reach
    Posts
    561
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by garhkal View Post
    One thing i have always wondered is we have areas of the country (west coast, New mexico etc) with long lasting droughts, but we have other areas continually getting flooded out.
    Being both cases cost money to resolve, wouldn't it make more sense to put that money to better use, like building a series of big pipes to take the water from the flooded areas, and pump it to those under drought conditions? Or if piping is unfeasable, how's about use those tanker trains to ship it over.
    Can't say for sure, but it sounds cost-prohibitive.

    Think of it this way; if someone could figure out a way to make money off of this, we'd be doing it already.

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Columbus, ohio
    Posts
    3,328
    Mentioned
    29 Post(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by BENDER56 View Post
    Can't say for sure, but it sounds cost-prohibitive.

    Think of it this way; if someone could figure out a way to make money off of this, we'd be doing it already.
    And is it not cost prohibitive to consistently pay out billions for flood damage, and drought damage year after year?

    Is like the powr companies who spend a mil and a half each and every storm to repair damage to downed power lines (as well as cause all those headaches for consumers who get stuck with no power), why not spend the 10 mil to BURY the cables so they don't get damaged in the first place??

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •