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Thread: Suicide victims

  1. #11
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    This is a touchy subject but at the end of the day when they kill themselves they made a choice, I see this as more closer to someone getting a DUI when they are an alcoholic, as that was a choice too. In war actions are most instict based on what your are trained on and other things.

    It takes a lot of strenth for someone to come forward and admite they need help and to get that help. Those that do not just sit there and make the matters worse for themselves and in the end take the cowardly way out. I am sure there are things wrong to a point where they did was that they did but if they do not get help there is nothing anyone can do. Same with an alcoholic. Everyone see's horors in their lives, though I think we all have to admite some see things worse than others but they are still horrors. Each person acts differently.

    If someone kills themselves we should note it and move on. They do not deserve the same treatment as actual heroes. Im not saying we should turn our backs on their families but we need to help them as they are who gets hurt out of all this. They should get benifiets for the family but not a hero's funeral. True hero's would never leave this world worse than when they were in it, and that means for the families they leave behind.

  2. #12
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    http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn...071702692.html

    The families of those who die of combat wounds or in noncombat accidents receive condolence letters from the president. The families of suicide victims do not. Should their families receive condolence letters from the President?

    The Pentagon doesn't tell units how to mourn soldiers who commit suicide in combat, but it makes distinctions between suicides and other war deaths. Should this distinction be made?

    Gen. Peter Chiarelli, the Army's vice chief of staff, recently told commanders to conduct the same memorial services for battlefield suicides as they would for other deaths. The order provoked controversy among some commanders, who argued that suicide was dishonorable. IS it dishonorable?

    I saw something on the evening news earlier this week about suicided soldier's families now being awarded some type of lapel pin I think it was and I was just curious, hence this post.

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