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Thread: An idea just crazy enough to work?

  1. #1
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    An idea just crazy enough to work?

    So I was casually talking to a friend who is still in the Air Force. This friend has been in 6 years and has 2 years remaining on his enlistment. He is torn on whether or not he wants to reenlist but is leaning towards not reenlisting. If he walks away after this enlistment at 8 years he will leave with nothing right? No, not if he uses my idea.

    In this current climate of cuts the AF is happy to pay you to leave unless you were already willing to leave in which case you leave with nothing. So, you ask, "How can I get the Air Force to pay me to leave?" Simple, you just need to make yourself ineligible for reenlistment. There are several ways to do this but most involve you wearing your service dress to the commander's office. There is one way though that will reflect negative on you but isn't something you will lose a stripe over. Deny an assignment!

    Here is how it works. At around 6 years you decide you are definitly separting at the end of your term. You logon to EQUAL and change your dreamsheet to Worldwide volunteer and then also add Korea and any other Short tour. Then you simply wait for an assignment. Once you get the assignment you deny it which automatically makes you inelgible for promotion and reenlistment. At that point you are gone either on the next DOS Rollback or at the end of your term whichever comes first. You also walk out the door with a huge check for seperation pay which compensates you for the time you have already served.

    Pretty genius idea right? Now I know some of you will flame me for this post but what is the difference between the guy who screws around and forces the AF to retire him at 8 years versus the guy who hangs on 12 years after that just to get a retirement? I say their isn't a difference.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SomeRandomGuy View Post
    So I was casually talking to a friend who is still in the Air Force. This friend has been in 6 years and has 2 years remaining on his enlistment. He is torn on whether or not he wants to reenlist but is leaning towards not reenlisting. If he walks away after this enlistment at 8 years he will leave with nothing right? No, not if he uses my idea.

    In this current climate of cuts the AF is happy to pay you to leave unless you were already willing to leave in which case you leave with nothing. So, you ask, "How can I get the Air Force to pay me to leave?" Simple, you just need to make yourself ineligible for reenlistment. There are several ways to do this but most involve you wearing your service dress to the commander's office. There is one way though that will reflect negative on you but isn't something you will lose a stripe over. Deny an assignment!

    Here is how it works. At around 6 years you decide you are definitly separting at the end of your term. You logon to EQUAL and change your dreamsheet to Worldwide volunteer and then also add Korea and any other Short tour. Then you simply wait for an assignment. Once you get the assignment you deny it which automatically makes you inelgible for promotion and reenlistment. At that point you are gone either on the next DOS Rollback or at the end of your term whichever comes first. You also walk out the door with a huge check for seperation pay which compensates you for the time you have already served.

    Pretty genius idea right? Now I know some of you will flame me for this post but what is the difference between the guy who screws around and forces the AF to retire him at 8 years versus the guy who hangs on 12 years after that just to get a retirement? I say their isn't a difference.
    Not bad, but you still have to get the assignment. But if your friend declines testing for promotion. This also makes you inelegible for promotion and reenlistment, and you test almost yearly. And depending on your career field the odds of an assignment may not be in his favor.
    Five Meters of Voided Space.

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    I don't believe that will work. If he gets DOS roll back he doesn't receive a voluntary separation pay because he didn't voluntarily separate. And if he has to get out at the end of his enlistment he wouldn't receive payment either. People just don't get money when they get out. They have to be forced out through no fault of their own to receive any kind of payment. DOS rollbacks are generally the fault of the individual.

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    Quote Originally Posted by MERC8401 View Post
    I don't believe that will work. If he gets DOS roll back he doesn't receive a voluntary separation pay because he didn't voluntarily separate. And if he has to get out at the end of his enlistment he wouldn't receive payment either. People just don't get money when they get out. They have to be forced out through no fault of their own to receive any kind of payment. DOS rollbacks are generally the fault of the individual.
    With the DOS rollback you get half the separation allowance if you are over six years.
    Five Meters of Voided Space.

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    I believe you are thinking of VSP. I find it very hard to believe that they would give someone a separation pay for rolling back their DOS. Let them keep their GI Bill benefits...yes...some VA stuff...sure...but pay them...doubt it. These are people who are already identified for separation...they just push them out early...to save money. If what you say is true then anyone who has served over 6 years who wants to get out...shouldn't just serve there time and get out...because that wouldn't give them money. They should find a way to get coded for separation...and hope for a DOS rollback. You are crazy.

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    Quote Originally Posted by MERC8401 View Post
    I believe you are thinking of VSP. I find it very hard to believe that they would give someone a separation pay for rolling back their DOS. Let them keep their GI Bill benefits...yes...some VA stuff...sure...but pay them...doubt it. These are people who are already identified for separation...they just push them out early...to save money. If what you say is true then anyone who has served over 6 years who wants to get out...shouldn't just serve there time and get out...because that wouldn't give them money. They should find a way to get coded for separation...and hope for a DOS rollback. You are crazy.
    If you are separated under DOS rollback you do get separation pay. You just have to have served over 6 years and you have to sign a commitment to serve 3 years on IRR (Inactive Ready Reserve). Here is a link to the Air Force Announcement about FY14 DOS rollback. The people who are rolled back also do not have to pay back any unearned reenlistment bonus, they get and ID card for 2 years, and the get free tricare for 6 months. They get all that in addition to their normal VA benefits which include GI Bill. It really is a sweet deal. If you are over 6 years and want to leave you need to get in trouble instead of just doing your time. You will be rewarded for it.


    JOINT BASE SAN ANTONIO -- RANDOLPH, Texas (AFNS) -- In addition to force management programs announced in July, the Air Force will implement the Enlisted Date of Separation Rollback Program for fiscal 2014, Air Force Personnel Center officials said Dec. 17.

    The rollback will accelerate the date of separation for senior master sergeants and below who meet required criteria, said Lt. Col. Rick Garcia, the AFPC retirements and separations branch chief. Airmen affected must separate from the Air Force by May 31, 2014, and those eligible to retire must do so effective May 1, 2014 or sooner.

    Airman can be considered for the DOS rollback only if they meet all of the following:

    - Have fewer than 15 years on active duty as of May 31, or 20 years or more on or before April 30.
    - Have a May 31, 2015 or earlier DOS for Airmen eligible to be separated, or April 30, 2015 DOS or earlier for retirement-eligible Airmen.
    - Have a 3D or 3E reenlistment code, an 09 assignment availability code or a 3E grade status reason that renders them ineligible to reenlist.

    Codes used to identify Airmen for DOS rollback will reflect Airmen who have refused to acquire retainability for promotion, temporary duty, permanent change of station, training, retraining or professional military education.

    Airmen eligible to retire may also be vulnerable to DOS rollback separation, Garcia said.

    "Retirement is not automatic. If you are eligible to retire and identified for DOS rollback, you must submit a retirement application by Jan. 31, 2014, for the May 1 or earlier retirement. If you do not, you will be separated instead, and will not receive retirement benefits," he explained.

    Airmen separated or retired under DOS rollback will not be required to repay unearned portions of bonuses, special pays or other monetary incentives, Garcia said. They will also not be entitled to any unpaid portions of bonuses, special pays, or other monetary incentives.

    Airmen affected by the rollback may also be entitled to separation pay, the colonel said.

    Airmen who have at least six but less than 20 years of active service who are not first termers may be eligible for full separation pay, if they sign an Individual Ready Reserve agreement. In addition, Airmen on active duty for 180 days or more will be authorized transition assistance benefits, such as permissive temporary duty, 180 days extended medical care for themselves and their family members, and two years of commissary and exchange privileges.

    In addition to separation benefits, retiring and separating members are required to participate in a comprehensive transition assistance program which includes such mandatory elements as pre-separation counseling, a five-day workshop, a VA benefits briefing, and a capstone review. Optional additional training seminars and extensive one-on-one career counseling are available at their respective installations, Garcia explained.

    For more information about FY14 Force Management Programs and other personnel issues, visit the myPers website. For complete details on the DOS Rollback Program, enter "PSDM 13-122" in the search window.
    http://www.af.mil/News/ArticleDispla...anagement.aspx

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    Senior Member Rusty Jones's Avatar
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    That's a huge problem I have with the military. When your ETS comes, you either get out now or your next opportunity won't be for another two years. It's not possible to simply stay beyond your term until you find another job. That's why I think everyone should get a nice chunk of change for leaving. Except officers - they get to stay beyond their initial obligation, and resign when they find a new job.

    In addition, reenlisting because you're afraid of not being able to find a job right away is a long term solution to a short term problem. A long term solution that far too many people use, even though it's not good for them and, ultimately, not good for the service that they belong to. Giving money to enlisted who leave voluntarily - as the norm, not just when the military is cutting down - could help with that problem.
    "Well... Uber's going to "driverless" cars soon, and their research probably shows that they're a natural fit (when it comes to getting paid for doing nothing)."
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rusty Jones View Post
    That's a huge problem I have with the military. When your ETS comes, you either get out now or your next opportunity won't be for another two years. It's not possible to simply stay beyond your term until you find another job. That's why I think everyone should get a nice chunk of change for leaving. Except officers - they get to stay beyond their initial obligation, and resign when they find a new job.

    In addition, reenlisting because you're afraid of not being able to find a job right away is a long term solution to a short term problem. A long term solution that far too many people use, even though it's not good for them and, ultimately, not good for the service that they belong to. Giving money to enlisted who leave voluntarily - as the norm, not just when the military is cutting down - could help with that problem.
    The solution to this problem has been propsed several times already. Switch to a 401K type retirement. The government should providea certain percentage of your pay into a 401K account. This solves two probelms. It compenstates people who wants to serve their country but not for 20 years and it more accurately reflects the cost of military personnel. Instead of kicking the can down the road congress can pay up front for personnel.

    I would even be in favor of the second part of your post. Initial enlistment contracts are important because the military has a sizeable investement in training and upstart costs (clearance, PCS, recruiting, etc). In my opinion at the end of that contract your enlistment should default to the same as what officers get. They only need to extend if they want to get promoted to another rank or take an assignment. If they want to leave they have to request to resign. The same could work for enlisted. If you get orders to PCS or need to go to a training you would have to extend or renenlist but if you are simply staying put where you are and you are a good troop I'm ok with you staying on for a few months or even a few years. The only issue with this is when someone's enlistment is over and they stick around then get tasked for a deployment. That's really no different though than people over 20 years who retire under the 7 day option instead of accepting a deployment.

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    Senior Member Smeghead's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bumble78 View Post
    Not bad, but you still have to get the assignment. But if your friend declines testing for promotion. This also makes you inelegible for promotion and reenlistment, and you test almost yearly. And depending on your career field the odds of an assignment may not be in his favor.
    That's not true. I declined testing in 2001. I'm still here.

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    How bout just extending for 24 months and not making Staff. HYT will give some $$$ up correct?!

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