Criticism Over Blast Leads Top Air Force General to Retire

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The top general of the Air Force said today that he would retire early, in part because he believed one or more Air Force officers would unfairly be held responsible for the terrorist attack in Saudi Arabia that killed 19 airmen last year, lawmakers and Pentagon officials said.
The officer, Gen. Ronald R. Fogleman, said he would step down by Sept. 1, a year before his four-year term expires. General Fogleman, a member of the Joint Chiefs of Staff since 1994, would become the first Air Force Chief of Staff to leave voluntarily before his tenure was up.

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A Pentagon inquiry last year singled out an Air Force commander, Brig. Gen. Terryl J. Schwalier, for failing to safeguard the complex adequately. But two Air Force reports concluded that the bombing was not the fault of General Schwalier.
The Air Force has delayed promoting General Schwalier to two stars from one star pending Mr. Cohen's decision. Some lawmakers are urging the Defense Secretary to cancel General Schwalier's promotion, which would have the effect of ending his career.
''Someone should be held accountable, shouldn't they?'' Senator Richard C. Shelby, an Alabama Republican who heads the Intelligence Committee, said in a recent interview.
Secretary Cohen, aware of the reports of General Fogleman's possible retirement, had already started interviewing candidates before today's announcement, aides said, and will nominate a replacement soon.

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General Fogleman angered some senior lawmakers and Pentagon officials with his rigid stance on Lieutenant Flinn's case. In testimony before the Senate Appropriations Committee in May, General Fogleman said that by focusing on the adultery charge lawmakers were losing sight of a more important issue.
''This is an issue about an officer entrusted to fly nuclear weapons who disobeyed an order, who lied,'' General Fogleman said. ''That's what this is about.''

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In 1995, General Fogleman won a reputation for holding Air Force personnel to higher standards after he grounded five officers and imposed administrative penalties on several others for their role in the downing of two Army helicopters over Iraq. Twenty-six people were killed when two Air Force F-15's mistakenly shot down the helicopters. One captain went to trial for his role in the accident, but he was acquitted.
General Fogleman and other senior Air Force officials closed ranks in support of General Schwalier, criticizing the original Pentagon inquiry, headed by a retired four-star Army general, Wayne A. Downing.

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https://www.nytimes.com/1997/07/29/u...to-retire.html
Doesn't seem that long ago...I'm getting old.