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garhkal
09-01-2015, 02:40 AM
Well, i have found 'gainful' employment finally since my retirement in 2012.. Had a 50 day period with one security company last year, but didn't pass their probie period. Got a new security company back near the end of june this year.. and have been with them since.

However, this morning i found out something that is making me want to pull out my hair (if i had it longer than mil crew cut length at least)..
Apparantly, working for 2 contracts under 2 different contracting agencies, does NOT mean even if the total hours worked in a week is 40+, i don't get over time unless ONE of those companies total hours for it exceeded 40.. So i can work a 74.5 hour week (which i just got done doing the week before last), where 35hrs was for company 1 under contract 1, and the other 39.5 hrs are with company 2 under contract 2..

So even though i worked my butt off, even on 2 of my 'scheduled' days off (due to other officers missing their shift/resigning), and had almost 75 hrs of work done, i don't qualify for any over time pay, since neither 'contracts total hours' exceeded the magic 40 hr limit..

So technically, i could do a shift monday into tuesday of 15.5 hrs, tuesday evening into wed morning, of 14 hrs with company 1, the same hrs with company 2 for wed into thurs and thurs into fri, then the same again with a 3rd company for two 12 hrs shifts over fri-sat and sat-sun, but not qualify for overtime work...

Bos Mutus
09-01-2015, 05:18 AM
Well, i have found 'gainful' employment finally since my retirement in 2012.. Had a 50 day period with one security company last year, but didn't pass their probie period. Got a new security company back near the end of june this year.. and have been with them since.

However, this morning i found out something that is making me want to pull out my hair (if i had it longer than mil crew cut length at least)..
Apparantly, working for 2 contracts under 2 different contracting agencies, does NOT mean even if the total hours worked in a week is 40+, i don't get over time unless ONE of those companies total hours for it exceeded 40.. So i can work a 74.5 hour week (which i just got done doing the week before last), where 35hrs was for company 1 under contract 1, and the other 39.5 hrs are with company 2 under contract 2..

So even though i worked my butt off, even on 2 of my 'scheduled' days off (due to other officers missing their shift/resigning), and had almost 75 hrs of work done, i don't qualify for any over time pay, since neither 'contracts total hours' exceeded the magic 40 hr limit..

So technically, i could do a shift monday into tuesday of 15.5 hrs, tuesday evening into wed morning, of 14 hrs with company 1, the same hrs with company 2 for wed into thurs and thurs into fri, then the same again with a 3rd company for two 12 hrs shifts over fri-sat and sat-sun, but not qualify for overtime work...

...that doesn't seem right...unless you have two separate jobs.

MikeKerriii
09-01-2015, 05:28 AM
Well, i have found 'gainful' employment finally since my retirement in 2012.. Had a 50 day period with one security company last year, but didn't pass their probie period. Got a new security company back near the end of june this year.. and have been with them since.

However, this morning i found out something that is making me want to pull out my hair (if i had it longer than mil crew cut length at least)..
Apparantly, working for 2 contracts under 2 different contracting agencies, does NOT mean even if the total hours worked in a week is 40+, i don't get over time unless ONE of those companies total hours for it exceeded 40.. So i can work a 74.5 hour week (which i just got done doing the week before last), where 35hrs was for company 1 under contract 1, and the other 39.5 hrs are with company 2 under contract 2..

So even though i worked my butt off, even on 2 of my 'scheduled' days off (due to other officers missing their shift/resigning), and had almost 75 hrs of work done, i don't qualify for any over time pay, since neither 'contracts total hours' exceeded the magic 40 hr limit..

So technically, i could do a shift monday into tuesday of 15.5 hrs, tuesday evening into wed morning, of 14 hrs with company 1, the same hrs with company 2 for wed into thurs and thurs into fri, then the same again with a 3rd company for two 12 hrs shifts over fri-sat and sat-sun, but not qualify for overtime work...

Which employer should have to pay you the overtime penalty of time and a half? How would you propose changing the law without ripping off one of the employers?

LogDog
09-01-2015, 05:49 AM
Well, i have found 'gainful' employment finally since my retirement in 2012.. Had a 50 day period with one security company last year, but didn't pass their probie period. Got a new security company back near the end of june this year.. and have been with them since.

However, this morning i found out something that is making me want to pull out my hair (if i had it longer than mil crew cut length at least)..
Apparantly, working for 2 contracts under 2 different contracting agencies, does NOT mean even if the total hours worked in a week is 40+, i don't get over time unless ONE of those companies total hours for it exceeded 40.. So i can work a 74.5 hour week (which i just got done doing the week before last), where 35hrs was for company 1 under contract 1, and the other 39.5 hrs are with company 2 under contract 2..

So even though i worked my butt off, even on 2 of my 'scheduled' days off (due to other officers missing their shift/resigning), and had almost 75 hrs of work done, i don't qualify for any over time pay, since neither 'contracts total hours' exceeded the magic 40 hr limit..

So technically, i could do a shift monday into tuesday of 15.5 hrs, tuesday evening into wed morning, of 14 hrs with company 1, the same hrs with company 2 for wed into thurs and thurs into fri, then the same again with a 3rd company for two 12 hrs shifts over fri-sat and sat-sun, but not qualify for overtime work...
No offense, but if you're working for two different companies and you don't work more than 40 hours for either company then why would you think working 75 hours between the two companies entitles you to overtime pay? I can see it if you did that for one company. As MikeKerriii asked, which company would pay you overtime? If you worked for Walmart and McDonald's and put in 35 hours at each company why would either company be required to give you overtime.

The problem you have is holding down two part-time jobs instead of one full-time job. I'm not chastising you because in many locations full-time jobs just aren't there so people have to take two or three part-time jobs. I can empathize with you because you're working a lot of hours for two companies for the same pay whereas others working the same number of hours for one company get time-and-a-half.

hustonj
09-01-2015, 12:30 PM
I could easily be wrong, but . . ..


Got a new security company back near the end of june this year.. and have been with them since.

Apparantly, working for 2 contracts under 2 different contracting agencies,

This text suggests to me that he has a single employer who is assigning him work under two different contracts with two different external clients.

It sounds like the single employer is trying to pretend employment under the 2 contracts is the same as employment by two different companies.

But, again, I could be wrong.

MikeKerriii
09-01-2015, 04:45 PM
I could easily be wrong, but . . ..



This text suggests to me that he has a single employer who is assigning him work under two different contracts with two different external clients.

It sounds like the single employer is trying to pretend employment under the 2 contracts is the same as employment by two different companies.

But, again, I could be wrong.

Legally you are a employed by the contracting agency, so two agencies means two employers. The employers is not pretending anything.

Mjölnir
09-01-2015, 04:55 PM
Legally you are a employed by the contracting agency, so two agencies means two employers. The employers is not pretending anything.

It depends on whose employee he actually is.

If he was an employee of a company who handled the contracting then he is an employee of the single company. If the company is basically an arbiter and @garkhal is classified as a subcontractor ... then the agency would not be required to provide overtime.

If you are considered an individual contractor, those are also generally exempt from federal & state overtime pay requirements.

Bos Mutus
09-01-2015, 05:01 PM
Legally you are a employed by the contracting agency, so two agencies means two employers. The employers is not pretending anything.

That's not right. I work for a company, but I do work on two different contracts...I bill my hours separately because it depends who they charge for which portion of my pay...but I have only one employer, the company.

Either way, I don't get overtime because I'm salaried...but hourly employees would get overtime.


It depends on whose employee he actually is.

If he was an employee of a company who handled the contracting then he is an employee of the single company. If the company is basically an arbiter and @garkhal is classified as a subcontractor ... then the agency would not be required to provide overtime.

If you are considered an individual contractor, those are also generally exempt from federal & state overtime pay requirements.

Interested what his actual status is...but, if he is an hourly employee and gets one paycheck...seem like a call to the local Labor board might be in order. Surely, Garkhal would never belong to a union.

SomeRandomGuy
09-01-2015, 05:10 PM
It depends on whose employee he actually is.

If he was an employee of a company who handled the contracting then he is an employee of the single company. If the company is basically an arbiter and @garkhal is classified as a subcontractor ... then the agency would not be required to provide overtime.

If you are considered an individual contractor, those are also generally exempt from federal & state overtime pay requirements.

This is correct. If Garhkal is an independent contractor he can work for as many companies as he wants and no one owes him overtime. The only way he would be entitled to overtime would be if he worked 40 hours for himself. Now, if he works for one company who assigns him work under two different contracts then he is entitled to overtime.

Here is a link to a case where a company (Microsoft) tried to pretend several of their employees were actually independent contractors. That would mean Microsoft wouldn't need to withhold taxes, pay for insurance or basically do any of the normal HR functions. http://corporate.findlaw.com/human-resources/employee-or-independent-contractor-the-implications-of-microsoft.html

Microsoft lost because of the "20 Factor Test" In short, you can't pretend someone is an independent contractor if you actually control what they do.

LogDog
09-02-2015, 12:47 AM
Okay, it seems to be a little clear now. I you work for one company and they split our work hours between two contracts then it would appear you deserve to be paid for overtime. It doesn't matter if you worked at one, two, three or more locations for the same or different client(s) you're still under the control of the company you're working for. You may want to contact the agency in your state that deals with worker protections.

Absinthe Anecdote
09-02-2015, 02:26 AM
I think it is pretty clear what is going on here.


http://youtu.be/gzZNh0P9K38

garhkal
09-02-2015, 03:13 AM
...that doesn't seem right...unless you have two separate jobs.

It doesn't does it.

It's one job with security company A. They are sub-contracted by many different security organizations on an emergency service like basis. So often i might have company A requiring me for spot ABC for days XYZ, while company C might call our company and i get placed at spot DEF for a day or two..


Which employer should have to pay you the overtime penalty of time and a half? How would you propose changing the law without ripping off one of the employers?

As i said above, i work for company A.
Company X sub-contracts us to work various spots all over Columbus (inc the spot i worked for Mon through Thurs).
Company Y also sub-contracted us for a supposed 2 week emergency period for 'shop ZZ', which started thursday, but after the sunday-monday shift, and what that shop needed us for was repaired, the contract got cancelled.

So i work only for the one company. BUT they were 'sub-contracted' by 2 others..


I could easily be wrong, but . . ..

This text suggests to me that he has a single employer who is assigning him work under two different contracts with two different external clients.

It sounds like the single employer is trying to pretend employment under the 2 contracts is the same as employment by two different companies.

But, again, I could be wrong.

That sums it up nicely. I figured since i worked the hours consecutively for the ONE company i work for, it should count as overtime. BUT since they see it as being 2 separate contracts, with 2 pay checks and 2 'separate' time cards' effectively, neither added up to the 40+ hr time frame..



Interested what his actual status is...but, if he is an hourly employee and gets one paycheck...seem like a call to the local Labor board might be in order. Surely, Garkhal would never belong to a union.

It would be interesting to find out what my 'status' is.. BUT as i mentioned above, we are an "emergency service provider to many other 'security organizations'.. SRI, Arrow, to name a few.

I have sent off an email to wagehour.com.state.oh.us to find out..

Bos Mutus
09-02-2015, 04:23 AM
It doesn't does it.

It's one job with security company A. They are sub-contracted by many different security organizations on an emergency service like basis. So often i might have company A requiring me for spot ABC for days XYZ, while company C might call our company and i get placed at spot DEF for a day or two..



As i said above, i work for company A.
Company X sub-contracts us to work various spots all over Columbus (inc the spot i worked for Mon through Thurs).
Company Y also sub-contracted us for a supposed 2 week emergency period for 'shop ZZ', which started thursday, but after the sunday-monday shift, and what that shop needed us for was repaired, the contract got cancelled.

So i work only for the one company. BUT they were 'sub-contracted' by 2 others..



That sums it up nicely. I figured since i worked the hours consecutively for the ONE company i work for, it should count as overtime. BUT since they see it as being 2 separate contracts, with 2 pay checks and 2 'separate' time cards' effectively, neither added up to the 40+ hr time frame..



It would be interesting to find out what my 'status' is.. BUT as i mentioned above, we are an "emergency service provider to many other 'security organizations'.. SRI, Arrow, to name a few.

I have sent off an email to wagehour.com.state.oh.us to find out..


State laws awns vary widely...I can pretty much guarantee in CA you'd be entitled to overtime. I can't speak for OH, but sounds like you are headed in the right direction if that's your Labor Dept.....I think your company could be in serious trouble if this has gone on very long.

UncaRastus
09-02-2015, 02:31 PM
Garkhal,

The company that you worked for, for a month, than you were let go. Now, you work for another company that subcontracts you out at their own pleasure, and you have worked enough hours to gain a larger check than what they paid you (hopefully).

If you are going after them to pay the overtime, it seems to me that they can cut your hours way back, in response to you trying to get your extra money. As a different kind of payback.

Oh, but some law or another says that they can't cut your hours or fire you for doing this?

I suspect that the company probably has some kind of means to sideline you, if you cause trouble, using whatever means that they see fit, legal or not.

When I retired, I worked time and a half, double time and even triple time. That was then, this is now. Maybe you can harvest all kinds of money. However, back then, I worked way too many hours to gain a fist full of money.

How? When I reached a certain threshold, it became non productive, because I was taxed so much that I started to lose money. Being unmarried at the time, no kids, in other words, no dependents and no marital status to get the whole lot of money back at tax time, it sucked.

I was working at a hospital, at the time. A small hospital. I went from being a night shift drone for Respiratory Therapy, I did all right. Then I became the guy in charge of night shift, and after awhile, the night shift was whittled down to just me and whomever we got through a health care hire out agency. Still, doing all right, with a good paycheck, with shift differential added on.

Then I was made in charge of the evening shift. Samo thing. But my pay started to look not so good, after the taxes.

Then I was put onto the day shift also. Not in charge of the day shift, but yeah. I was there 3 shifts, 5 days a week.

Oops. I was there on the weekends, also. I lived at the hospital. I had a few times when I had almost all night with nothing to do, but I had to be within a 15 minute drive of getting to the hospital, if a code blue was called, or a baby came in, needing an oxygen tent, and so on. Seeing as to how my house was a half hour away? I had to stay there at the hospital.

I lived at the hospital, basically. I slept at the hospital. I ate 3 meals a day at the hospital. I should have made enough money to buy the hospital.

But the taxman was always there. I did get some of my hard earned money back, but not nearly enough to really say that I was King of the Hospital.

I did that for 18 months. I saw almost all of the RT staff fired, because I was willing to be there. I was the RT Department for much of the time that I spent there.

In the end, I was fired. Because I made too much money, basically. Kind of. Sort of. In the departments head's eyes, anyhow. But there it was. Fired for being there too much, at the Department heads whim. I didn't make all those great greenbacks, but the gov't did, through taxation.

That was 18 months of my life, using the doctor's changing room shower, eating some nasty stuff that the cafeteria thought was scrumptious. Using the hospitals laundry service. Getting fired for making too much money that was taxed away. I was moved way up in the tax brackets.

In other words, is going after the extra pay worth it, in the long run? You will be pissing off the powers that be, Garkhal.

Also, if the taxes are basically the same as back then ... ouch.

Maybe people can work long hours and get better pay, without the gov't stepping in and saying 'yoinks'. I am not sure about that. It has been quite awhile since I did my time working insane hours. However, pissing off the powers that be can still end up being a bad scenario, I do believe.

Bos Mutus
09-02-2015, 03:15 PM
How? When I reached a certain threshold, it became non productive, because I was taxed so much that I started to lose money.

This in an interesting side topic...but, you can't actually lose money by earning more and "going into a higher tax bracket." That's not how marginal tax rates work, really. You are taxed at the higher rate only on the money you earn into the higher tax bracket...your first X amount of dollars is still taxed at the lower rate.


Being unmarried at the time, no kids, in other words, no dependents and no marital status to get the whole lot of money back at tax time, it sucked.

Don't confuse "what you get back" with how much you paid in taxes. What you get back is a function of simply how much you've had taken out with respect to what you owe...you can get a lot more back if you have them take more out...

I always find it a little funny when people get confused by "How did you get so much more back than me, and earned a lot more"...well, cuz I had twice as much taken out during the year.

Some people who get little to none back owe little or none in tax...just got all their money all year.

It's also funny how some people rate the quality of their tax preparer based on how much they get back... "Oh, you went H&R and got only $1,500 back? You should've went to Liberty Tax, they got me $4,500!"... of course two people's taxes can not be compared like that...and there is no way to tell from those numbers which tax preparer did their client a better job.

Numbers gurus will tell you the ideal object is to get Zero back at tax filing time...this means you had the money in your hands all year instead of giving the govt. an interest-free loan. Of course, this is mathematically correct, but you also have to consider your spending habits...if you are just going to blow that extra $200 per month or whatever...it is kind of nice to get a refund of $2400 back instead...but it's true that if you put that $200 to better use all year, you'd be better off. I still get a pretty big refund and keep it that way on purpose...and I know it's mathematically not smart.

UncaRastus
09-02-2015, 04:09 PM
Bos,

I am not sure if the taxation has changed over the years, but back then, I started to see how my 'extra paycheck' went down, even though, at the time, I was working past time and a half to double time.

I was even warned by a friend that working too much had it's monetary downfall. That was in California, way back when. Maybe the taxation has changed. I must say, from what you have said, it has changed.

When I was finally fired from the hospital, I went to working with my twin brother, to help him change a dairy farm over to a calf ranch. I ended up living on that ranch for a year, because someone had to be watchman for our building stuff.

I ended up chasing dogies on horseback, watering down 'the sand pit' where the new born calves were kept in casitas, at 0500. And rebuilding stuff. And so on.

Keep in mind that I volunteered to help my brother, to get the job done. I figured what's a month or two?

I ended up being a cowboy, ranch security, and ranch builder all wrapped up into one. For free.

I didn't need the extra money, but I thought that being a help to my bro, it was all good.

Then my twin brother left the ranch one day, and came back, announcing that he was now employed by the city.

Yeah. Sometimes, even a twin brother can blindside you. I left the ranch and I went to live down in Los Playas de Rosarito (Rosarito Beach) in a nice beach house, in the Baja.

And my bro was never invited to ever come down there.

Ah, yes. Memories ...

SomeRandomGuy
09-02-2015, 06:26 PM
It would be interesting to find out what my 'status' is.. BUT as i mentioned above, we are an "emergency service provider to many other 'security organizations'.. SRI, Arrow, to name a few.

I have sent off an email to wagehour.com.state.oh.us to find out..

This is the important question. Since you have mentioned Overtime benefits I assume you are not a salary employee. There are certain categories of employees that are considered "exempt" Almost everyone who fits in that category is a salary employee anyways.

My guess is that you are entitled to overtime but your company is suddenly trying to pretend that you are an "independent contractor". Back on page one I linked the Microsoft case where Microsoft was trying to avoid their portion of FICA taxes and benefits by pretending their employees were independent contractors. The easiest way to determine if you are an independent contractor is how you get paid. If you submit a timesheet and get a paycheck you are an employee. If you are submitting invoices to accounts payable you might be an independent contractor.

As far UncaRastus advice above about "not biting off the hand that feeds you" I would ignore that. It sounds like your company is screwing you over. They are probably doing this to other employees as well. You need to stand up for your rights even if that gets you terminated. The State Labor Relations Board needs to know about it if your company is using illegal labor practices. They are a lot more common than people realize.

When I was 16 I was dating a girl who worked at Sonic. The restaurant would open at 11AM. She told me that sometimes she would report to work and her boss would tell her not to clock in until they needed her. She would just sit back in the break room until he decided she could clock in. I alerted her to the fact that this is illegal. If you employer requires you to report to work they owe you a minimum of two hours pay even if they send you home right away. I sent her to work with a copy of the relevant law to provide her manager. Apparently, this restaurant was just a franchise and the owner wasn't aware of said labor law. Things were changed rather quickly and all employees compensated with back pay. Also, no one got fired over the issue. It's never a bad thing to make your employer follow the law. If they don't want to you probably don't want to work there anyways.

Bos Mutus
09-02-2015, 06:37 PM
This is the important question. Since you have mentioned Overtime benefits I assume you are not a salary employee. There are certain categories of employees that are considered "exempt" Almost everyone who fits in that category is a salary employee anyways.

My guess is that you are entitled to overtime but your company is suddenly trying to pretend that you are an "independent contractor". Back on page one I linked the Microsoft case where Microsoft was trying to avoid their portion of FICA taxes and benefits by pretending their employees were independent contractors. The easiest way to determine if you are an independent contractor is how you get paid. If you submit a timesheet and get a paycheck you are an employee. If you are submitting invoices to accounts payable you might be an independent contractor.

As far UncaRastus advice above about "not biting off the hand that feeds you" I would ignore that. It sounds like your company is screwing you over. They are probably doing this to other employees as well. You need to stand up for your rights even if that gets you terminated. The State Labor Relations Board needs to know about it if your company is using illegal labor practices. They are a lot more common than people realize.

When I was 16 I was dating a girl who worked at Sonic. The restaurant would open at 11AM. She told me that sometimes she would report to work and her boss would tell her not to clock in until they needed her. She would just sit back in the break room until he decided she could clock in. I alerted her to the fact that this is illegal. If you employer requires you to report to work they owe you a minimum of two hours pay even if they send you home right away. I sent her to work with a copy of the relevant law to provide her manager. Apparently, this restaurant was just a franchise and the owner wasn't aware of said labor law. Things were changed rather quickly and all employees compensated with back pay. Also, no one got fired over the issue. It's never a bad thing to make your employer follow the law. If they don't want to you probably don't want to work there anyways.

Really good post, SRG...too bad I could only like it once.

You're right about your girl's Sonic job...stuff like that happens a lot and is completely illegal.

You can tell the companies that have been through the ringer on it or have a lot of assets to protect...step-daughter was working for Wal-Mart, in her store employees would get fired for not taking lunch at or under the 5 hour mark, one warning, second time you're gone...because it was a labor standards violation. She was asking me about it, like, why would they fire you for NOT taking a lunch? Simple, their liability for allowing you to do so is huge...punitive damages for a billion dollar corporation.

UncaRastus
09-02-2015, 08:14 PM
There are maybe bullet proof laws as to employment nowadays. Which would make my point worth nothing.

Good luck with you getting that money, Garkhal!

MikeKerriii
09-03-2015, 04:23 AM
It depends on whose employee he actually is.

If he was an employee of a company who handled the contracting then he is an employee of the single company. If the company is basically an arbiter and @garkhal is classified as a subcontractor ... then the agency would not be required to provide overtime.

If you are considered an individual contractor, those are also generally exempt from federal & state overtime pay requirements.
If he works for two different contractors then there is no obligation for overtime since each of the contractors is a separate employer, The place where he works is just a client of those contractors not an employer.

garhkal
09-03-2015, 05:03 AM
This is the important question. Since you have mentioned Overtime benefits I assume you are not a salary employee. There are certain categories of employees that are considered "exempt" Almost everyone who fits in that category is a salary employee anyways.

My guess is that you are entitled to overtime but your company is suddenly trying to pretend that you are an "independent contractor".

Since i have worked for this company, i have already had 2 other weeks where i got paid overtime... One was for a 42.5 hr week and the other a 51 hr week..

So i have already had overtime from them..


When I was 16 I was dating a girl who worked at Sonic. The restaurant would open at 11AM. She told me that sometimes she would report to work and her boss would tell her not to clock in until they needed her. She would just sit back in the break room until he decided she could clock in. I alerted her to the fact that this is illegal. If you employer requires you to report to work they owe you a minimum of two hours pay even if they send you home right away. I sent her to work with a copy of the relevant law to provide her manager. Apparently, this restaurant was just a franchise and the owner wasn't aware of said labor law. Things were changed rather quickly and all employees compensated with back pay. Also, no one got fired over the issue. It's never a bad thing to make your employer follow the law. If they don't want to you probably don't want to work there anyways.

When has ignorance of the law been an excuse for breaking it??
And why was no one fired for it??


There are maybe bullet proof laws as to employment nowadays. Which would make my point worth nothing.

Good luck with you getting that money, Garkhal!

Thanks..

retiredAFcivvy
09-03-2015, 03:59 PM
[QUOTE=garhkal;358477]Since i have worked for this company, i have already had 2 other weeks where i got paid overtime... One was for a 42.5 hr week and the other a 51 hr week..

So i have already had overtime from t

When has ignorance of the law been an excuse for breaking it??
And why was no one fired for it??



Thanks.

retiredAFcivvy
09-03-2015, 04:01 PM
[QUOTE=garhkal;358477]Since i have worked for this company, i have already had 2 other weeks where i got paid overtime... One was for a 42.5 hr week and the other a 51 hr week..

So i have already had overtime from t

When has ignorance of the law been an excuse for breaking it??
And why was no one fired for it??



Thanks.

Sorry I messed up.
Were the hours under just on contract?

retiredAFcivvy
09-03-2015, 04:26 PM
Just curious. Are any of the contracts with the government?

garhkal
09-03-2015, 07:40 PM
[QUOTE=retiredAFcivvy;358478]

Sorry I messed up.
Were the hours under just on contract?

Yes. The first (42.5 hrs paid for) was under one contract working at a Biglots store (though i also have to mention it seems there was an error IN that pay check as i only worked 36.5 hrs, so was overpaid 6 hrs worth, but prior to that time i had one week i did 23 hrs but only got paid 21 hrs, and one i did 40.25 hrs and got paid for 40.. There was also one day i worked in the very first week, we had to scramble around to find the time sheet FOR that day, so that might explain why i got the overpay there), and the other was 51 hrs worth, also at the same store (i did 2 days at 12.5 hrs, each day, and the rest at the normal 6 hrs worth, with one at 8 hrs worth)..


Just curious. Are any of the contracts with the government?

Nope. Arrow security, Security Resources and SOS security (those are the 3 i know of)..