PDA

View Full Version : Some US troops and veterans now barred from Garmisch's Edelweiss resort



Bos Mutus
07-24-2015, 04:38 PM
GRAFENWÖHR, Germany — Some servicemembers and retirees will no longer be able to use an Armed Forces Recreation Center in Garmisch following a recent review of the center’s reservations policies, the military said Tuesday. The review found that rules on who can stay at the Army’s Installation Management Command-run resort were not being followed and that vacationers who were technically ineligible to stay at the resort were still being allowed to do so. As a result, the Edelweiss Lodge and Resort — a vacation destination popular with U.S. servicemembers — issued an update to its website in June defining eligibility.
Retirees are among the most affected by these guidelines. For example, military retirees not residing in Germany cannot stay at the resort unless they can prove they have spent at least 30 days in Europe. Those retirees living in Germany can stay at the hotel if they have proper tax authorization from a German customs office.
Servicemembers based in the continental United States are also barred from staying at the resort unless they are traveling with a sponsor who lives in Germany or they have been in Europe for longer than a month.
Active-duty personnel serving within U.S. European Command aren’t affected by this update and are still able to use the resort. This eligibility extends to National Guardsmen and reserve troops on active-duty status within EUCOM for more than 30 days.
Resort officials said the change in booking procedures was made in accordance with the Status of Forces Agreement between Germany and U.S. forces stationed here.
“It is an unfortunate development and we’re so sorry this may limit lodging options for servicemembers and retirees visiting Europe,” Clesson D. Allman, general manager of Edelweiss, said in a statement Tuesday. “But we must comply with the SOFA agreement.”

http://www.stripes.com/news/some-us-troops-and-veterans-now-barred-from-garmisch-s-edelweiss-resort-1.359019


Stayed at the Edelweiss a few times...beautiful military resort, on the border of Germany/Austria...great place to base out of for Oktoberfest...

...turns out now you can only stay there if you're already stationed in Germany. Bummer.

UncaRastus
07-24-2015, 05:03 PM
While I was stationed in Japan, the first night on the town was kind of enlightening,

This older gentleman was riding his bicycle down the road, laden with many baskets of who knows what. He was bowing to me as he came up to me, and I did a bow back, He was still bowing to me when he passed me I suppose, because I heard a crash, and he had gone into the benjo (sewage) ditch, bike, baskets, and all.

I helped him out of the ditch, which ruined my evening, because I had to return to the barracks to shower off the crap.

So, back then, they still supported the idea that they had to bow to their conquerors. Back then, a tradition, I suppose.

A few months later, I was about 20 miles off base, and I went to a bar for a drink. Posted by the entrance hatch was a sign stating 'No Americans Allowed'.

I don't know. Maybe it was a Yakusa hangout? Business men not wanting to see Americans?

I entered, sat down at the bar, ordered a shot of whisky. It was delivered. I drank it down, then I left. The entire place was totally silent while I was in there.

I was young. And I was 'No one is gonna keep me from going where I want to go'. And I was probably pretty much dumb for having entered that place.

The same thing after I retired. I had a beach house on Los Playas de Rosarito in Baja California for about two years. There was a bar in town that had a sign that said 'No hay NorteAmericanos Permitidos'. This time I was more leery of entering a bar that didn't want NA citizens, but the door man said to me, "No hay problema, usted vive aquí."

Basically, he said, "Not a problem, you live here".

And there was no problem.

Foreign countries can be strange.

Bos Mutus
07-24-2015, 06:07 PM
While I was stationed in Japan, the first night on the town was kind of enlightening,

This older gentleman was riding his bicycle down the road, laden with many baskets of who knows what. He was bowing to me as he came up to me, and I did a bow back, He was still bowing to me when he passed me I suppose, because I heard a crash, and he had gone into the benjo (sewage) ditch, bike, baskets, and all.

I helped him out of the ditch, which ruined my evening, because I had to return to the barracks to shower off the crap.

So, back then, they still supported the idea that they had to bow to their conquerors. Back then, a tradition, I suppose.

A few months later, I was about 20 miles off base, and I went to a bar for a drink. Posted by the entrance hatch was a sign stating 'No Americans Allowed'.

I don't know. Maybe it was a Yakusa hangout? Business men not wanting to see Americans?

I entered, sat down at the bar, ordered a shot of whisky. It was delivered. I drank it down, then I left. The entire place was totally silent while I was in there.

I was young. And I was 'No one is gonna keep me from going where I want to go'. And I was probably pretty much dumb for having entered that place.

The same thing after I retired. I had a beach house on Los Playas de Rosarito in Baja California for about two years. There was a bar in town that had a sign that said 'No hay NorteAmericanos Permitidos'. This time I was more leery of entering a bar that didn't want NA citizens, but the door man said to me, "No hay problema, usted vive aquí."

Basically, he said, "Not a problem, you live here".

And there was no problem.

Foreign countries can be strange.

Edelweiss is a US Military facility.

I'm gathering from the article though that it is a SOFA deal...basically, the Germans want tourists to stay in German hotels, not the base ones, so they make that part of allowing the facility...and just figured out that the DOD was not enforcing that at the Edelweiss..