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Bos Mutus
05-21-2015, 06:09 PM
A New Jersey judge dismissed the domestic violence charges against former Baltimore Ravens (http://forums.militarytimes.com/nfl/teams/bal/) running back Ray Rice (http://forums.militarytimes.com/nfl/players/8832/) on Thursday. The charges stemmed from a February 2014 incident in which Rice struck his now-wife Janay in an elevator at an Atlantic City casino. The NFL originally suspended Rice for two games, but the suspension became indefinite and the Ravens cut him after the graphic video of the altercation surfaced in September.

Rice, who was charged with third-degree aggravated assault, avoided jail time after being accepted into a pretrial intervention program (including anger management) for first-time offenders. Rice completed the program this week, and Judge Michael A. Donio dismissed the charge Thursday, according to NBC News (http://www.nbcnews.com/storyline/nfl-controversy/domestic-violence-charges-against-ray-rice-dismissed-judge-confirms-n362581).

The NFL’s indefinite suspension of Rice was eventually lifted following an appeal that was heard by federal judge Barbara S. Jones, who criticized the NFL’s handling of the situation.
Rice, who remains a free agent, told the Baltimore Sun (http://www.baltimoresun.com/sports/ravens/bal-full-qa-with-exravens-running-back-ray-rice-20150228-story.html#page=2) in February that the completion of the program would give him “a refreshing start.”

“I’m actually done in my case,” Rice said. “Really, I just have to call the state of New Jersey once a month. After May 19, I’m done. It will be a full year. It will be like a refreshing start.”
Rice called the situation a “nightmare” and told the Sun that he is trying to move forward.

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I would assume that dismissing the charges was part of a deal for him completing the anger management/intervention program...

I wonder if those programs actually work, or if it's just people "getting through it to get the credit" like traffic school...although, I'm sure sure someone could be sincere in their desire to change...when it is court-ordered or coerced through a deal to dismiss charges, the motivation can be suspect.

Even if one is sincere...I wonder if these types of programs actually help, or does just sincerely wanting to change all it takes?

That said, I have no reason to doubt his sincerity...don't know the guy, but seems like he is genuinely sorry this all happened...his statements seem, to me, to demonstrate real remorse...i.e. not just sorry that he got caught.

sandsjames
05-21-2015, 06:37 PM
I would assume that dismissing the charges was part of a deal for him completing the anger management/intervention program...

I wonder if those programs actually work, or if it's just people "getting through it to get the credit" like traffic school...although, I'm sure sure someone could be sincere in their desire to change...when it is court-ordered or coerced through a deal to dismiss charges, the motivation can be suspect.

Even if one is sincere...I wonder if these types of programs actually help, or does just sincerely wanting to change all it takes?

That said, I have no reason to doubt his sincerity...don't know the guy, but seems like he is genuinely sorry this all happened...his statements seem, to me, to demonstrate real remorse...i.e. not just sorry that he got caught.

I would hope that this program works (and similar programs). I've tried to find some stats for repeat offenders but can't find anything that seems accurate (a few different sites with stats that aren't even close to each other).

SomeRandomGuy
05-21-2015, 07:02 PM
I would assume that dismissing the charges was part of a deal for him completing the anger management/intervention program...

I wonder if those programs actually work, or if it's just people "getting through it to get the credit" like traffic school...although, I'm sure sure someone could be sincere in their desire to change...when it is court-ordered or coerced through a deal to dismiss charges, the motivation can be suspect.

Even if one is sincere...I wonder if these types of programs actually help, or does just sincerely wanting to change all it takes?

That said, I have no reason to doubt his sincerity...don't know the guy, but seems like he is genuinely sorry this all happened...his statements seem, to me, to demonstrate real remorse...i.e. not just sorry that he got caught.

Even though the charges were dismissed in this case I would say that Rice, "paid his debt to society." He's actually received a much harsher punishment than most domestic violence offenders. He lost his job and several million dollars. Whether the program did anything for him or not I think he learned his lesson. It's important to remember that the point of the criminal justice system is deterrence, rehabilitation, not revenge. Some offenders need jail time to get the point across. Others may just need a class. In this case, I think the legal system did it's job. Society doesn't need it's "pound of flesh" from the guy. The victim in the case ended up marrying the guy.

I would support these first time offender programs for just about any offense short of the most violent (rape, murder). To me, it doesn't matter whether the program works for everyone or not. I think first time offenders should get a chance to rehabilitate their self even if the program didn't work for others. The key to me is what I said above. The goal of the criminal justice system is not revenge. It is deterrence (for both the offender and others) and rehabilitation. I think the justice system met it's goals in this case.