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Bos Mutus
05-21-2015, 04:43 PM
Stupid Social Media "Quizzes, Challenges, etc."

They are stupid quizzes that any idiot can answer...then they say "Oh, you aced it, you're in the Top 1%, highly intelligent, etc."....I guess they've figured out that no one shares quizzes they flunk, but hundreds of people will share on that says they are smarter than everyone.

Like really 99% of the people can't think of a name that starts with the Letter 'O'? ...but there they are, dozens and hundreds of people proving their high intellect by saying "Oliver, Oscar, Olivia, Orenthal..."...and sharing so that all their friends can see they are a top one percenter, oh how intelligent they must be for thinking up a name with the letter 'O'...

...hell, most of those quizzes mark you as 100% no matter what you answer, just so you'll share the stupid quiz.

sandsjames
05-21-2015, 05:11 PM
Stupid Social Media "Quizzes, Challenges, etc."

They are stupid quizzes that any idiot can answer...then they say "Oh, you aced it, you're in the Top 1%, highly intelligent, etc."....I guess they've figured out that no one shares quizzes they flunk, but hundreds of people will share on that says they are smarter than everyone.

Like really 99% of the people can't think of a name that starts with the Letter 'O'? ...but there they are, dozens and hundreds of people proving their high intellect by saying "Oliver, Oscar, Olivia, Orenthal..."...and sharing so that all their friends can see they are a top one percenter, oh how intelligent they must be for thinking up a name with the letter 'O'...

...hell, most of those quizzes mark you as 100% no matter what you answer, just so you'll share the stupid quiz.

LOL...too funny. What I love just as much are the "Share this if you are against child abuse" or whatever other things they throw up there. It's funny to think back before internet/social media when this sort of thing was done through a "chain letter" which was (and probably still is, if it still happens) illegal.

I'm curious as what the purpose of getting people to share stuff is. Is there a prize?

Bos Mutus
05-21-2015, 05:14 PM
I'm curious as what the purpose of getting people to share stuff is. Is there a prize?

At some level, I think it generates traffic for their site, which can turn into income with ads and things...not sure about the share thing, but I assume there must be some income in it somewhere.

Mjölnir
05-21-2015, 05:22 PM
At some level, I think it generates traffic for their site, which can turn into income with ads and things...not sure about the share thing, but I assume there must be some income in it somewhere.

True, it can do things like:

-generates 'hits' for the site (a metric used to sell advertising.)
-implants cookies on your computer, used to track your browsing history (what kind of things do you look at so to aim certain types of advertising to you.)

So yeah, it is a way of generating income for the site user, they don't develop Farmville just for free ... it is all about the rent.

Bos Mutus
05-31-2015, 07:16 PM
When people say, "No veteran should ever be homeless in our country."

The implication of this to me is, "Everyone who serves one term in the military should be given housing for life."

I'm all for helping out vets, especially if they have illness or injury from their service...but I hardly think every veteran deserves housing for life. You did your service and are entitled to some benefits for that...but not lifetime housing.

Rusty Jones
05-31-2015, 07:32 PM
When people say, "No veteran should ever be homeless in our country."

The implication of this to me is, "Everyone who serves one term in the military should be given housing for life."

I'm all for helping out vets, especially if they have illness or injury from their service...but I hardly think every veteran deserves housing for life. You did your service and are entitled to some benefits for that...but not lifetime housing.

Thirty-six months of GI Bill will get you a bachelor's and a master's, assuming that you left the military with zero college credits. How much is that? How much after you add 36 months of BAH? Probably just as much, if not more, than the value of a three bedroom house. I always thought they should offer that as a choice for people who don't intend to go to college after separating. Free college, or... a free house.

Absinthe Anecdote
05-31-2015, 07:37 PM
When people say, "No veteran should ever be homeless in our country."

The implication of this to me is, "Everyone who serves one term in the military should be given housing for life."

I'm all for helping out vets, especially if they have illness or injury from their service...but I hardly think every veteran deserves housing for life. You did your service and are entitled to some benefits for that...but not lifetime housing.

In other words, you object to people making emotion based statements that omit practicality and rational thought.

Heck, I'd be willing to say, "No person should be homeless in the world."

However, that says nothing about who is responsible for paying for it.

I say we get congress to renew the Patriot Act and then use the Bulk Data Collection Program to identify people who complain about hyphenated Americans and charge them higher taxes to pay for homeless veteran housing.

sandsjames
05-31-2015, 07:40 PM
In other words, you object to people making emotion based statements that omit practicality and rational thought.

Heck, I'd be willing to say, "No person should be homeless in the world."

However, that says nothing about who is responsible for paying for it.

I say we get congress to renew the Patriot Act and then use the Bulk Data Collection Program to identify people who complain about hyphenated Americans and charge them higher taxes to pay for homeless veteran housing.

You are the best at beating a dead horse.

UncaRastus
05-31-2015, 08:04 PM
Can I have the hooves when you are done beating the dead horse, AA? I need some more of them for my newly established glue factory.

Bos Mutus
05-31-2015, 08:05 PM
In other words, you object to people making emotion based statements that omit practicality and rational thought.

Not entirely, I don't think.


Heck, I'd be willing to say, "No person should be homeless in the world."

However, that says nothing about who is responsible for paying for it.

The veteran argument, seems to me, to have more of an implication that we as a nation are failing our veterans if there are homeless vets.



I say we get congress to renew the Patriot Act and then use the Bulk Data Collection Program to identify people who complain about hyphenated Americans and charge them higher taxes to pay for homeless veteran housing.

Bos Mutus
05-31-2015, 08:07 PM
Thirty-six months of GI Bill will get you a bachelor's and a master's, assuming that you left the military with zero college credits. How much is that? How much after you add 36 months of BAH? Probably just as much, if not more, than the value of a three bedroom house. I always thought they should offer that as a choice for people who don't intend to go to college after separating. Free college, or... a free house.

That might be a fair discussion to have...but we never see people complaining "No veteran should be without a college degree"

Absinthe Anecdote
05-31-2015, 08:17 PM
You are the best at beating a dead horse.

Thanks! I don't even put that much effort into it, just a natural talent that I have.

Seriously, a few days ago I was sitting at a traffic light and a dude with a homeless veteran sign was panhandling for change.

My first reaction was look at the drug addict trying to use sympathy for veterans to fill his change cup.

I have no idea if he was really a veteran or not, but I'm pretty sure he was a drug addict.

Does this guy deserve compassion? Yes, but he has to take care of that drug problem before anyone can help him.

I read an article recently that claimed there are 50,000 Afghan/Iraq veterans living on the streets.

I really don't know how to help these people that I see on a daily basis out begging for drug money. Some aren't really homeless, it is easy to spot the homeless ones cause they are really dirty and usually have a lot of bags with them.

I thought about printing up some phamplets that has information of kicking drugs and getting housing assistance.

It would be nice to hand them something instead of a couple bucks toward their next high.

Yes, I know it would be little more than a hollow gesture, but it was all I could think of.

Absinthe Anecdote
05-31-2015, 08:27 PM
Not entirely, I don't think.



The veteran argument, seems to me, to have more of an implication that we as a nation are failing our veterans if there are homeless vets.

It definitely has that implication, and I think it is misguided for the most part. Becoming homeless usually involves several factors.

Many times mental illness and/or drug abuse are key factors. Can mental illness and drug abuse be linked to military service?

Yes.

My city has a veterans center that helps get these guys off the streets and into treatment.

A very big part of the equation is the veteran. They have to seek out help, just like anyone else.

Rusty Jones
05-31-2015, 08:59 PM
That might be a fair discussion to have...but we never see people complaining "No veteran should be without a college degree"

Because everyone knows that a veteran will have one without spending a dime, if he or she wants one (or two). If the government is going to spend $130K (a guestimate) on a veteran's GI Bill benefits, it should make no difference if that same amount is spent on a house. Most veterans would probably be better off with no degree and a house that's paid for than with a degree and having to pay rent/mortgage.

garhkal
05-31-2015, 09:28 PM
A very big part of the equation is the veteran. They have to seek out help, just like anyone else.

Combined with the fact there are many veteran assistance programs out there. Its just the homeless don't seek them out, or often don't know about them.

sandsjames
05-31-2015, 10:07 PM
Thanks! I don't even put that much effort into it, just a natural talent that I have.

Seriously, a few days ago I was sitting at a traffic light and a dude with a homeless veteran sign was panhandling for change.

My first reaction was look at the drug addict trying to use sympathy for veterans to fill his change cup.

I have no idea if he was really a veteran or not, but I'm pretty sure he was a drug addict.

Does this guy deserve compassion? Yes, but he has to take care of that drug problem before anyone can help him.

I read an article recently that claimed there are 50,000 Afghan/Iraq veterans living on the streets.

I really don't know how to help these people that I see on a daily basis out begging for drug money. Some aren't really homeless, it is easy to spot the homeless ones cause they are really dirty and usually have a lot of bags with them.

I thought about printing up some phamplets that has information of kicking drugs and getting housing assistance.

It would be nice to hand them something instead of a couple bucks toward their next high.

Yes, I know it would be little more than a hollow gesture, but it was all I could think of.

Here's my confusion with the whole thing. Disabled veterans get a pretty good paycheck. Non-disabled have the ability to work, so I don't really have any more or less sympathy for them than I do a civilian.

The biggest cause, I think, is that for many Soldiers and Marines, all they know is infantry/combat, and don't have any real usable skills on the outside, unless they can get a job at a security firm or something.

I don't know how to fix that.

Mjölnir
05-31-2015, 11:06 PM
That might be a fair discussion to have...but we never see people complaining "No veteran should be without a college degree"

No veteran who wants one should be without a college degree. True fact ... there are myriad opportunities for personnel to get college education while on active duty. When I first went back to college some of the classes were through the mail, the internet changed that and you can do web-based seminar instruction now. It is way to easy for someone to get a degree if they want one. Now, I will caveat that with -- for some people it is easier than others, since some people have jobs that provide them more time to do it -- but my opinion is that if I ... as an infantryman in reconnaissance units doing 6 months deployed and 6 months at home for the better part of 6 years can do it ... anyone can.



Because everyone knows that a veteran will have one without spending a dime, if he or she wants one (or two). If the government is going to spend $130K (a guestimate) on a veteran's GI Bill benefits, it should make no difference if that same amount is spent on a house. Most veterans would probably be better off with no degree and a house that's paid for than with a degree and having to pay rent/mortgage.

I am mixed on that. In part because the GI Bill was designed to educate veterans (either in vocational or other collegiate programs) to integrate them back into the workforce -- something that helped create the American middle class. Granted, this was at a time when a lot of military job skills did not equate to a civilian job, now they do.

As far as giving folks a house, total GI Bill benefits do not equal a house in most markets (when not calculating the MHA). And, a veteran with a college degree has the potential to earn a lot more over a lifetime than the mortgage or just a flat payout on the GI Bill benefits. Now a vet that has no intention of going to college, and getting a degree might benefit more from a $61,000 payout towards a home, but for the most part & in the long run they would be better off financially with the degree ... or transferring the benefits to their kid(s). Granted, some may not want to do that

Based on FY14 rates is is a bit less than $130,000 (depending on MHA): $1717.00 for 36 months is just over $61,000. The MHA (Monthly Housing Allowance) a veteran gets is at the E5 w/ dependents rate and only if they are a full time student. Based on locality the more pricey a place you live/go to school the higher it would be (San Francisco has the highest rate for E5 w/ deps -- $3,840 per mo. which for 36 mos would be $138,240. But I doubt most people are going to school there.)

Rusty Jones
06-01-2015, 01:15 AM
No veteran who wants one should be without a college degree. True fact ... there are myriad opportunities for personnel to get college education while on active duty. When I first went back to college some of the classes were through the mail, the internet changed that and you can do web-based seminar instruction now. It is way to easy for someone to get a degree if they want one. Now, I will caveat that with -- for some people it is easier than others, since some people have jobs that provide them more time to do it -- but my opinion is that if I ... as an infantryman in reconnaissance units doing 6 months deployed and 6 months at home for the better part of 6 years can do it ... anyone can.




I am mixed on that. In part because the GI Bill was designed to educate veterans (either in vocational or other collegiate programs) to integrate them back into the workforce -- something that helped create the American middle class. Granted, this was at a time when a lot of military job skills did not equate to a civilian job, now they do.

As far as giving folks a house, total GI Bill benefits do not equal a house in most markets (when not calculating the MHA). And, a veteran with a college degree has the potential to earn a lot more over a lifetime than the mortgage or just a flat payout on the GI Bill benefits. Now a vet that has no intention of going to college, and getting a degree might benefit more from a $61,000 payout towards a home, but for the most part & in the long run they would be better off financially with the degree ... or transferring the benefits to their kid(s). Granted, some may not want to do that

Based on FY14 rates is is a bit less than $130,000 (depending on MHA): $1717.00 for 36 months is just over $61,000. The MHA (Monthly Housing Allowance) a veteran gets is at the E5 w/ dependents rate and only if they are a full time student. Based on locality the more pricey a place you live/go to school the higher it would be (San Francisco has the highest rate for E5 w/ deps -- $3,840 per mo. which for 36 mos would be $138,240. But I doubt most people are going to school there.)

Right, but I'm saying 36 months of BAH *plus* the maximum amount of tuition payable by the GI Bill would equal the amount that a veteran could get a house for.

If a first termer uses their active duty resources correctly (i.e., CLEP, DSST, TA), there's no reason they shouldn't come out with either an associates's or 60 credits toward a bachelor's. One could even come out with a bachelor's degree in that time frame if they CLEP/DSST at least half their bachelor's.

Either, the point is that one can elect the house and still come out with a significant amount of a bachelor's degree already completed. And with the money saved by not having to pay rent or mortgage, they can put themselves through college with the money earned from their civilian job.

Mjölnir
06-01-2015, 01:48 AM
Right, but I'm saying 36 months of BAH *plus* the maximum amount of tuition payable by the GI Bill would equal the amount that a veteran could get a house for.

Of course, the maximum is a heck of a lot of money.


If a first termer uses their active duty resources correctly (i.e., CLEP, DSST, TA), there's no reason they shouldn't come out with either an associates's or 60 credits toward a bachelor's. One could even come out with a bachelor's degree in that time frame if they CLEP/DSST at least half their bachelor's.

Either, the point is that one can elect the house and still come out with a significant amount of a bachelor's degree already completed. And with the money saved by not having to pay rent or mortgage, they can put themselves through college with the money earned from their civilian job.

Agreed, if someone maximized the opportunities on active duty (TA, CLEP, DANTES etc.) they could really take a huge chunk out of a degree without touching their GI Bill ... I did (all but 29 hours for my Bachelor's, 1 Masters with TA and one from a Fellowship Program.) I would argue that the option for a VA guaranteed loan is already a pretty good deal for a veteran. I would be concerned about is if the GI Bill was modified to cover a house or part of a house, what next? The GI Bill is a great benefit that veterans earn (no argument) but the canonization of veterans in the last few years while well intentioned isn't really necessary and the mentality of adding on to an already very generous in-service and post service compensation package will only make the federal debt bigger.

Rusty Jones
06-01-2015, 02:05 AM
Of course, the maximum is a heck of a lot of money.



Agreed, if someone maximized the opportunities on active duty (TA, CLEP, DANTES etc.) they could really take a huge chunk out of a degree without touching their GI Bill ... I did (all but 29 hours for my Bachelor's, 1 Masters with TA and one from a Fellowship Program.) I would argue that the option for a VA guaranteed loan is already a pretty good deal for a veteran. I would be concerned about is if the GI Bill was modified to cover a house or part of a house, what next? The GI Bill is a great benefit that veterans earn (no argument) but the canonization of veterans in the last few years while well intentioned isn't really necessary and the mentality of adding on to an already very generous in-service and post service compensation package will only make the federal debt bigger.

Well, it wouldn't be "adding on." It's simply taking the same money that would have been spent on one thing, and spending it on another.

Also, remember that getting a degree doesn't guarantee a related job. In other words, there's a risk behind getting a degree... a risk that doesn't exist with owning a house.

Mjölnir
06-01-2015, 02:31 AM
Well, it wouldn't be "adding on." It's simply taking the same money that would have been spent on one thing, and spending it on another.

True, but if you calculate it using the max benefit, that is far from where the average vet is relocating to.


Also, remember that getting a degree doesn't guarantee a related job. In other words, there's a risk behind getting a degree... a risk that doesn't exist with owning a house.

If you owned a house (even if you owned it outright, without a job or income to cover taxes and utilities you won't keep it long.

I am not saying I am entirely against the idea ... but can see where it could be problematic ... dropping $100,000, $120,000 or $160,000 on a house for everyone as they left the service; maybe a relook at how VA loans are worked would be better. One thing I like about the GI Bill and folks going back to school, is the long term investment and the non-instant gratification that results. You make the initial investment in the GI Bill with your money and service, the government provides the very generous amount of money for college when you get out but you still have to work for the degree (going to Harvard would be harder work than going to Coastal Carolina Community College ... but you do work for it.) As established, the GI Bill was part of a big package of veteran's benefits to get WWII veterans reintegrated into society ... but it (the degree or the training) wasn't just handed to them on their way out of the military.