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TIMBER73
05-06-2015, 07:59 PM
I'm currently on Active Duty with 20+ years of service. I was involved in an accident and may be retired due to my injuries. Is there a different in benefits for a medical retirement vs. a regular retirement(aside from disability payments)?

sandsjames
05-06-2015, 08:18 PM
I'm currently on Active Duty with 20+ years of service. I was involved in an accident and may be retired due to my injuries. Is there a different in benefits for a medical retirement vs. a regular retirement(aside from disability payments)?

Not as far as I know. You should get the full retirement plus the VA stuff for being medically retired. I've never actually heard of someone over 20 getting the medical retirement. I thought that was just for those who hadn't reached retirement eligibility yet. Guess I was wrong.

hustonj
05-06-2015, 08:23 PM
I went to Uncle Google before responding.

These guys:
http://www.dummies.com/how-to/content/military-medical-retirement-versus-va-disability.html

tell us that a medical retirement gives you the larger of a normally calculated retirement (2.5% of base pay high-three average per year served) OR your military-calculated disability rating time that same high-three average.

So, if your military calculated disability is above 50%, you can be eligible to retire normally but get paid a medical retirement at a higher rate.

THEN the VA calculates their version of your disability independently, and you are entitled to the VA disability pay in accordance with the normal rules. Which means if the VA calculates at least a50% disability, you get full concurrent receipt.

The additional retirement benefits should be the same, independent of whether you are normal or medically retired, I think.

UncaRastus
05-06-2015, 09:46 PM
Upon retirement, at least the way the service used to do these things, was to award a disabled vet whatever they decided that the disability was worth, then after 5 years a med board met and kicked the disability down to 30%, in a lot of cases.

A LOT of cases! Most, in fact.

50% was offered to many of those who were medically retired, which being tax free, did sound good to the people being retired. However, if you can get regular retired, then use the VA to gain compensation, it is the better way to go.

Getting reduced to 30%, even though tax free is hardly the thing that you want, if I am not mistaken.

The services are looking to cut costs any way that they can, because of the rather large increases in pay, BAH, BAS, and so on, during the Iraq and Afghanistan war years. Keep that in mind, please.

If that is the way they still do things, I would take the retirement from having served 20+, then immediately see the VA, after being retired from the service.

Back in the day, I had a stroke, followed by experimental surgery. The surgery was stopped, soon after my surgery was done, because of the mortality rate that it caused. Luckily, I had a very good C.O. that kept me on active duty for the last two years, until I could retire regularly.

I didn't have much say about whether or not they could do the surgery. I was kind of like speechless. My writing hand was paralyzed, also. However, I do remember being told that it was emergency surgery, only to find out after it was done that it was experimental.

Good luck on your retirement, anyway. Please check out the scenario that I have written about, unless someone online here can tell you of any changes that has taken place since my retirement which did occur some time ago.