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View Full Version : What's your opinion of using "retired" for those w/less than 20 yrs of service?



FatCat40
10-05-2014, 08:42 PM
Personally, as a 21 yr service retired veteran.....I find it offensive. IMO "retired" should be a title bestowed upon those who did 20 yrs or more of service. If you you were "medically" retired or retired for any reason other than longevity, I feel some other title should be used or added to retired to differentiate. JMO

Stalwart
10-05-2014, 08:45 PM
IMO, as a 24 year and still going veteran, I don't loose any status, pay or sleep when Cpl Kyle Carpenter, USMC retired (pictured below) is referred to as retired.

http://www.stripes.com/polopoly_fs/1.289786.1403218246!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_804/image.jpg
Cpl Kyle Carpenter, USMC retired

LogDog
10-05-2014, 10:11 PM
I have no problem with it. Retired, means you committed yourself to serving enough time in the military to earn a pension and its benefits. As long as you served honorably and met the requirement I don't see a difference, besides retirement pay, between someone retiring with 20, 24, 28, or 15 years of service.

Absinthe Anecdote
10-05-2014, 11:44 PM
IMO, as a 24 year and still going veteran, I don't loose any status, pay or sleep when Cpl Kyle Carpenter, USMC retired (pictured below) is referred to as retired.

http://www.stripes.com/polopoly_fs/1.289786.1403218246!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_804/image.jpg
Cpl Kyle Carpenter, USMC retired

This young man lost his right eye and most of his teeth. His jaw and right arm were shattered and he has undergone dozens of surgeries, and was medically retired.

It doesn't bother me one bit either.

I almost feel sorry for FatCat40, for saying such a dumb thing.

FatCat40

You can roll back your OP, we know you didn't mean to say something so petty.

FLAPS, USAF (ret)
10-06-2014, 03:17 AM
When DoD deems you eligible to be considered "retired," then you have rightfully earned that title. It may come at 20 years, 15 years (TERA), 30 or more years, or perhaps at age 65 if the rules change. As we bicker among ourselves about some magic TIS number, there are millions of people in this country who I'm sure would have no problem having us all wait to age 59 1/5...to receive our hard earned 401k annuity versus any pension.

Measure Man
10-06-2014, 03:03 PM
Personally, as a 21 yr service retired veteran.....I find it offensive. IMO "retired" should be a title bestowed upon those who did 20 yrs or more of service. If you you were "medically" retired or retired for any reason other than longevity, I feel some other title should be used or added to retired to differentiate. JMO

"Retired" is not a "title bestowed"...it is a military status.

If that's the person's status, then that's what they are...there is more than one way to be placed in retired status.

TJMAC77SP
10-06-2014, 03:21 PM
"Retired" is not a "title bestowed"...it is a military status.

If that's the person's status, then that's what they are...there is more than one way to be placed in retired status.

Best explanation I have seen.

socal1200r
10-06-2014, 07:16 PM
"Longevity" retired and "medically" retired I get. However, someone that serves less than 20 years, and gets out on their own, or is involuntarily separated, to me, isn't "retired". Doesn't get any benefits or entitlements, they should be referred to as "separated", not "retired". If someone puts in 8 years and decides to get out and pursue something else, they're not "retired", they "separated", and should be referred to as such.

SomeRandomGuy
10-06-2014, 07:34 PM
"Longevity" retired and "medically" retired I get. However, someone that serves less than 20 years, and gets out on their own, or is involuntarily separated, to me, isn't "retired". Doesn't get any benefits or entitlements, they should be referred to as "separated", not "retired". If someone puts in 8 years and decides to get out and pursue something else, they're not "retired", they "separated", and should be referred to as such.

Veteran, that is the word you are looking for. Someone who voluntarily separates is a veteran. This is normally what I hear these people refer to themselves as. People who are retired regardless of reason are also veterans. I'm not really sure why the OP is getting his panties in a wad over the term retired. If your grandfather worked at General Motors until he was 72 and your dad only worked there until 50 then took an early buyout are they not both retired?

Stalwart
10-06-2014, 07:43 PM
I am not aware of how someone voluntarily (or involuntarily) separates before being eligible for statutory retirement and is 'retired'.

Measure Man
10-06-2014, 10:54 PM
"Longevity" retired and "medically" retired I get. However, someone that serves less than 20 years, and gets out on their own, or is involuntarily separated, to me, isn't "retired". Doesn't get any benefits or entitlements, they should be referred to as "separated", not "retired". If someone puts in 8 years and decides to get out and pursue something else, they're not "retired", they "separated", and should be referred to as such.

Agree. I've never heard anyone that separated refer to themselves as retired military. They aren't retired.

I thought the OP was referring to either the early retirements or medical retirements...people that are retired, but have not done 20 years.

BENDER56
10-07-2014, 02:13 AM
Agree. I've never heard anyone that separated refer to themselves as retired military.

Nor have I, but I've read newspaper articles in which former military members are referred to as retired when it seems from other parts of the article that they are not. But that's just ignorance on the part of the writer.

FatCat40
10-07-2014, 04:05 AM
Agree. I've never heard anyone that separated refer to themselves as retired military. They aren't retired.

I thought the OP was referring to either the early retirements or medical retirements...people that are retired, but have not done 20 years.

I don't have an issue w/early retirement (since those are normally not less than 15 yrs and are generally at the military's suggestion). It is the medical "retirements" I have an issue with. I have read somewhere that only 17% of military personnel actually stay in for 20 yrs or more so to ME that is an accomplishment. When I think of retirement, I think of someone who has done 20 or more years. Since retiring and enrolling in school, I have conversed w/several former service members or spouses of former service members who mention they are retired. Upon congratulating them (assuming that like myself, they put in 20 or more) I am informed that some did ans little as 6-8 yrs and I am :O Don't get me wrong, anyone who signed up and was damaged while in service to the nation has my respect HOWEVER I think their title should be "medically" retired or even "Veteran" but not simply retired.

Drackore
10-07-2014, 06:37 AM
Being that you are retired and from reading your posts - I am gaining the insight that you have way too much time on your hands. Seriously - *this* is what you are concerned about? The title of "retired"?!?!?

Really?

Get over it.

edit: Even though I am not black, when I retire I want to be bestowed the "Blackly Retired" title. If I don't get it, I'll be mad and make posts here whining about it...maybe even call the ACLU.


I don't have an issue w/early retirement (since those are normally not less than 15 yrs and are generally at the military's suggestion). It is the medical "retirements" I have an issue with. I have read somewhere that only 17% of military personnel actually stay in for 20 yrs or more so to ME that is an accomplishment. When I think of retirement, I think of someone who has done 20 or more years. Since retiring and enrolling in school, I have conversed w/several former service members or spouses of former service members who mention they are retired. Upon congratulating them (assuming that like myself, they put in 20 or more) I am informed that some did ans little as 6-8 yrs and I am :O Don't get me wrong, anyone who signed up and was damaged while in service to the nation has my respect HOWEVER I think their title should be "medically" retired or even "Veteran" but not simply retired.

INGUARD
10-07-2014, 11:47 AM
Yes, I believe and give wholeheartedly respect for any servicemember who has served 20 years on federal active duty and is retired. But that is all semantics.

What about the Guard/Reservist who does 20 years of service, never deployed and did one weekend a month, compared to the 8 year, was active duty the whole time, medically retired vet? The 8 year AD had many more days of service compared to the Reservist/Guardsman but will not receive commissary benefits. What about the title 32 AD servicemember? There are many categories of retirees and yes, I have come across people who just separated and they confuse retiree with veteran and its no big deal. I been serving since 1983 and had a long break in service. I have 10 years in the reserve components and may be separated under TERA next year (15 years active). I will consider myself a retiree and will have 25 years of service but only 16 years active (I am curious on how my retirement pay will work). Do I still get a retirement ceremony if separated under TERA? Anyway, let's see what happens so I can earn the title that fatdog believes is the real deal of retirement titles.

http://militarypay.defense.gov/retirement/

http://militarypay.defense.gov/retirement/reserve.html

sandsjames
10-07-2014, 12:34 PM
Not sure what's difficult about this. If one receives a paycheck from DFAS every month after leaving active duty, they are retired from active duty.

Now what I have a problem with is those calling themselves veterans who have never actually served in a warzone. Not really, but I haven't complained about much in awhile.

Measure Man
10-07-2014, 07:55 PM
Now what I have a problem with is those calling themselves veterans who have never actually served in a warzone. Not really, but I haven't complained about much in awhile.

How do you feel about someone calling themselves a "disabled veteran" when their only disability is a scar from playing softball and an occasionally flare up of hemorrhoids?

sandsjames
10-07-2014, 09:20 PM
How do you feel about someone calling themselves a "disabled veteran" when their only disability is a scar from playing softball and an occasionally flare up of hemorrhoids?

Yeah, I have some issues with this...though I won't put it on the veteran themselves, most of the time. I know this has been brought up before, but those VA reps are out to get you as much as they can, no matter what (which I suppose is their job). So if you go to them with two issues you are probably going to end up submitting 10-12 issues in the end.

I guess I don't have a problem with someone being called a disabled vet if they've been given the rating. They are a veteran and they do have a disability rating.

Again, it's like the leave system. They are taken what's given to them. If people feel that it's gaming the system then the system needs to change, not the people.

TJMAC77SP
10-08-2014, 01:20 AM
How do you feel about someone calling themselves a "disabled veteran" when their only disability is a scar from playing softball and an occasionally flare up of hemorrhoids?

Hemorrhoids are nothing to mock sir !!

Seriously, the only time I even dream of 'using' the title 'disabled veteran' is to claim the points on a GS job application.

Measure Man
10-08-2014, 02:40 AM
Hemorrhoids are nothing to mock sir !!

Seriously, the only time I even dream of 'using' the title 'disabled veteran' is to claim the points on a GS job application.

Disclaimer: I am 20% disabled myself...having never been in combat. I've used it for the no-funding fee VA home loan, and tuition free college for a child in California. It is what it is. I'm not going to turn down benefits like that.

sandsjames
10-08-2014, 11:26 AM
Disclaimer: I am 20% disabled myself...having never been in combat. I've used it for the no-funding fee VA home loan, and tuition free college for a child in California. It is what it is. I'm not going to turn down benefits like that.

Exactly. It's a "title" that's given that is in compliance with the current regulations. If there is a problem, it's with the system, not with the retired/veteran/disabled veterans.

Stalwart
10-08-2014, 02:47 PM
Yep, the term is the term ... if you meet the criteria you have earned it.

If you think someone didn't do what you did, sacrifice what you sacrificed etc to get the title then that is probably your issue and not one with them (excluding fakers / posers).

A few of other potential terms to try to get as many people a title that covers their specific situation:

Retired (30+ years of service)
Retired (over 20 years of service)
Retired (20 Years on the dot)
Retired (Early, less than 20 years of service)
Retired (Combat Veteran)
Retired (Deployed to Combat Zone, Non-Combat Veteran)
Retired (Non-Combat Zone Deployed Veteran)
Retired (Deployment Veteran)
Retired (Never Deployed)
Retired (Never left CONUS)
Retired (Medical, Combat Disabled)
Retired (Medical, Non-Combat Disabled)
Retired (Medical, Intramural Sports Disabled)

TJMAC77SP
10-08-2014, 04:02 PM
Not that I am saying this is something that should be done but I would not be opposed (and would actually welcome) some designation that identifies a combat injured disabled vet and sets him/her apart from those of us who have rather benign conditions that meet the threshold with the VA.

Rusty Jones
10-08-2014, 04:19 PM
Not that I am saying this is something that should be done but I would not be opposed (and would actually welcome) some designation that identifies a combat injured disabled vet and sets him/her apart from those of us who have rather benign conditions that meet the threshold with the VA.

There is one benefit that they get - if they become federal employees, they get to double-dip on their active duty time.

Gonzo432
10-09-2014, 01:36 AM
Yep, the term is the term ... if you meet the criteria you have earned it.

If you think someone didn't do what you did, sacrifice what you sacrificed etc to get the title then that is probably your issue and not one with them (excluding fakers / posers).

A few of other potential terms to try to get as many people a title that covers their specific situation:

Retired (30+ years of service)
Retired (over 20 years of service)
Retired (20 Years on the dot)
Retired (Early, less than 20 years of service)
Retired (Combat Veteran)
Retired (Deployed to Combat Zone, Non-Combat Veteran)
Retired (Non-Combat Zone Deployed Veteran)
Retired (Deployment Veteran)
Retired (Never Deployed)
Retired (Never left CONUS)
Retired (Medical, Combat Disabled)
Retired (Medical, Non-Combat Disabled)
Retired (Medical, Intramural Sports Disabled)

Awesome list Stalwart. Can you add "service connected disability <50%, pays for own disability" to the retired 20 and up terms?