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View Full Version : CVS's new ads showing how health conscious they are..



garhkal
09-06-2014, 04:51 AM
I have been seeing a lot of adverts from CVS recently where they are trying to show how "Health conscious" the are by no longer selling Tobacco products. But i wonder. Do they still sell beer, soda and sugary snacks? If so, why are they still being sold when they are also unhealthy?

sandsjames
09-06-2014, 12:00 PM
I have been seeing a lot of adverts from CVS recently where they are trying to show how "Health conscious" the are by no longer selling Tobacco products. But i wonder. Do they still sell beer, soda and sugary snacks? If so, why are they still being sold when they are also unhealthy?

Of course they do. It's not about health at all. It's about being "modern".

TJMAC77SP
09-06-2014, 04:13 PM
I am actually surprised they stopped selling tobacco products.

The cynic in me says that sales of such products in their stores had declined to where it wasn't profitable. Thinking of the area where I live in every CVS location there is a stop and rob on a nearby corner that sells gas and tobacco products.

If Circle K, Kangaroo, etc stop selling tobacco products THAT would be news.

garhkal
09-06-2014, 07:05 PM
Now that i can see. That it was becoming less profitable, and they made this hackneyed story up of removing them to be healthier, as a way to not seem like anti-tobacco nut jobs.

But you would have thought, SOMEONE working for corporate CVS would have raised the issue that
"If we are doing this to seem healthier, and encourage better health for customers, what about beer and sugary products? If we still sell them, we are not really making things healthier".

TJMAC77SP
09-06-2014, 07:13 PM
Now that i can see. That it was becoming less profitable, and they made this hackneyed story up of removing them to be healthier, as a way to not seem like anti-tobacco nut jobs.

But you would have thought, SOMEONE working for corporate CVS would have raised the issue that
"If we are doing this to seem healthier, and encourage better health for customers, what about beer and sugary products? If we still sell them, we are not really making things healthier".

I was just watching CNN and they interviewed the CVS CEO and he stated that studies show that moderate use of the items you mentioned are not harmful but that any use of tobacco products is harmful. I don't think we will see them stop selling Magnum ice cream bars (those things rock !!)

FLAPS, USAF (ret)
09-07-2014, 04:23 AM
I wonder how CVS will replace the millions in lost revenue from this decision. There are a board of directors and shareholders to answer to.

TJMAC77SP
09-07-2014, 04:38 AM
I wonder how CVS will replace the millions in lost revenue from this decision. There are a board of directors and shareholders to answer to.

The reporter on the story quoted pretty much what I said earlier....declining sales in that area will be a drop in the bucket for them.

garhkal
09-07-2014, 09:12 AM
On another site i see this discussion going on at, someone brought up the thought that if they really want to push a culture of health, why the heck don't they start some sort of fitness program requirements for all their workers? Cause practically every CVS worker seen seems to be obese or at least heavily overweight.???

Stalwart
09-07-2014, 10:30 AM
An interesting article on this here:

http://www.vox.com/2014/9/3/6101521/cvs-cigarette-sales-ended-heres-why

The article does say that CVS expects to lose money in the short term: "So while CVS does expect to lose $2 billion in annual sales — about 3 percent of the chain's total revenue — they're making a much more long term, strategic play here. They're betting that health care is changing in two key ways.

1) Pharmacies will help manage customers' health

Pharmacies are typically where you go to pick up a prescription. The interaction is brief: give a name, date of birth, sign a form and walk out of the store, pill bottle in hand.

But that's not the future of pharmacies, at least how CVS sees it. They see that interaction as a huge, untapped opportunity to win contracts with hospitals and doctor offices aiming to cut spending.

....

2) Pharmacies will become health care providers themselves

CVS has increasingly made a play into the health care provider space, quickly scaling up its Minute Clinic locations. It now has 880 of these clinics scattered across the United States. These are the walk-in offices next to the pharmacies that provide routine care, often during the night and weekend hours that traditional doctor offices aren't open."

It is interesting, if the article is getting the conjecture correct that CVS is making a long-term strategic play that while losing the $2 billion per year in tobacco sale, would net them billions more in health care revenues.

efmbman
09-07-2014, 11:53 AM
On another site i see this discussion going on at, someone brought up the thought that if they really want to push a culture of health, why the heck don't they start some sort of fitness program requirements for all their workers? Cause practically every CVS worker seen seems to be obese or at least heavily overweight.???

Seriously? Imagine the lawsuit and "trampled rights" of those workers. They have a right to be as obese as they wish and their employer cannot mandate anything that may benefit the health of the workforce or lower long-term healthcare costs. That may inadvertently create a new protected class.

Rainmaker
09-07-2014, 12:57 PM
An interesting article on this here:

http://www.vox.com/2014/9/3/6101521/cvs-cigarette-sales-ended-heres-why

The article does say that CVS expects to lose money in the short term: "So while CVS does expect to lose $2 billion in annual sales — about 3 percent of the chain's total revenue — they're making a much more long term, strategic play here. They're betting that health care is changing in two key ways.

1) Pharmacies will help manage customers' health

Pharmacies are typically where you go to pick up a prescription. The interaction is brief: give a name, date of birth, sign a form and walk out of the store, pill bottle in hand.

But that's not the future of pharmacies, at least how CVS sees it. They see that interaction as a huge, untapped opportunity to win contracts with hospitals and doctor offices aiming to cut spending.

....

2) Pharmacies will become health care providers themselves

CVS has increasingly made a play into the health care provider space, quickly scaling up its Minute Clinic locations. It now has 880 of these clinics scattered across the United States. These are the walk-in offices next to the pharmacies that provide routine care, often during the night and weekend hours that traditional doctor offices aren't open."

It is interesting, if the article is getting the conjecture correct that CVS is making a long-term strategic play that while losing the $2 billion per year in tobacco sale, would net them billions more in health care revenues.

The article is a joke. There is no long term strategic play being made by CVS. Big Pharma (along with rest of the medical industry) was one of the principle authors of Obamacare. CVS is not betting anything. they already know what's coming cause they wrote the damn law. I suppose their CEO will give himself a $20 million dollar bonus for being such a clairvoyant genius and reading the tea leaves when this big "gamble" pays off. Crony Shit like this is why our country is bankrupt.

http://www.teapartynation.com/profiles/blogs/cvs-feeds-at-federal-trough?xg_source=msg_appr_blogpost

Absinthe Anecdote
09-07-2014, 01:42 PM
Stalwart

Pharmacies already play the role of health care provider in other countries, especially Asia. For minor ailments, it seems to work just fine.

While traveling in Thailand once, I had an eye infection and I walked into a modern looking pharmacy, conferred with a pharmacist who suggested a particular type of antibiotic ointment. I was out the door in minutes, with the right medication that cleared up my infection.

I think there are probably instances where a misdiagnosis could cause calamity, but there has to be aspects of that model of a pharmacy that would greatly enhance American health care.

CVS just might be right with their "forward thinking" on this.

If they truly want to distinguish their chain from the contemporary model of the American pharmacy, which is part convenience store, then stopping their tobacco sales would be the logical place to start.

They probably can't afford to get out of retailing all those other types of goods just yet, from birthday cards, school supplies, garden nomes, and candy bars.

I don't see the need to call the CVS decision to drop tobacco products as hypocritical.

Stalwart
09-07-2014, 01:44 PM
The article is a joke. There is no long term strategic play being made by CVS. Big Pharma (along with rest of the medical industry) was one of the principle authors of Obamacare. CVS is not betting anything. they already know what's coming cause they wrote the damn law. I suppose their CEO will give himself a $20 million dollar bonus for being such a clairvoyant genius and reading the tea leaves when this big "gamble" pays off. Crony Shit like this is why our country is bankrupt.

http://www.teapartynation.com/profiles/blogs/cvs-feeds-at-federal-trough?xg_source=msg_appr_blogpost

No argument on the involvement of big pharmaceutical companies and inputs to the law.

I would say the 'gamble' is how much of that market is going to come to CVS based on other competitors in the market. Wal-Mart is making a big play into it as well (but in no way discontinuing tobacco sales.) I read about Walgreens who is saying that right now they are continuing to sell tobacco products while also increasing the availability of tobacco cessation tools as well; Walgreens basically saying they were okay with trying to get revenue from both markets.

On one level, if CVS wants to change its 'brand' to be more healthy (taking a short term hit revenue but opting for a long term benefit), that is their option; same as if Chik-fil-A wants to stay closed on Sundays (taking up to a 1/7th reduction in possible revenue) is also their option. On another level, I won't say that I think CVS's decision is only based on trying to promote healthy living to it's customers.

Stalwart
09-07-2014, 01:47 PM
Stalwart

Pharmacies already play the role of health care provider in other countries, especially Asia. For minor ailments, it seems to work just fine.

While traveling in Thailand once, I had an eye infection and I walked into a modern looking pharmacy, conferred with a pharmacist who suggested a particular type of antibiotic ointment. I was out the door in minutes, with the right medication that cleared up my infection.

I think there are probably instances where a misdiagnosis could cause calamity, but there has to be aspects of that model of a pharmacy that would greatly enhance American health care.

CVS just might be right with their "forward thinking" on this.

If they truly want to distinguish their chain from the contemporary model of the American pharmacy, which is part convenience store, then stopping their tobacco sales would be the logical place to start.

They probably can't afford to get out of retailing all those other types of goods just yet, from birthday cards, school supplies, garden nomes, and candy bars.

I don't see the need to call the CVS decision to drop tobacco products as hypocritical.

I saw a similiar thing in the Czech Republic, pretty good service, cheap / available to the vast majority of people.

If CVS stops selling garden gnomes I will be pissed though.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/7/72/German_garden_gnome.jpg

Rainmaker
09-07-2014, 02:46 PM
Stalwart

Pharmacies already play the role of health care provider in other countries, especially Asia. For minor ailments, it seems to work just fine.

While traveling in Thailand once, I had an eye infection and I walked into a modern looking pharmacy, conferred with a pharmacist who suggested a particular type of antibiotic ointment. I was out the door in minutes, with the right medication that cleared up my infection.

I think there are probably instances where a misdiagnosis could cause calamity, but there has to be aspects of that model of a pharmacy that would greatly enhance American health care.

CVS just might be right with their "forward thinking" on this.

If they truly want to distinguish their chain from the contemporary model of the American pharmacy, which is part convenience store, then stopping their tobacco sales would be the logical place to start.

They probably can't afford to get out of retailing all those other types of goods just yet, from birthday cards, school supplies, garden nomes, and candy bars.

I don't see the need to call the CVS decision to drop tobacco products as hypocritical.

Dropping tobacco products isn't hypocritical. But, A corporation being chosen to receive billions of middle class tax dollars to prop up an unsustainable government bureaucratic disaster is hypocritcal. Maybe if .gov had spent the 6.5 Trillion dollars that Obamacare is projected to add to the deficit on recreating a manufacturing base. people would have jobs that actually paid a living wage and be able to afford insurance. Or companies might actually have to offer benefits like health care and pensions again in order to attract employees. Obamacare is the biggest crony, corporate, crook handout in history and has nothing to do with helping poor people and the red-team/ blue team assholes that gave us this shit show, so they can line their own pockets (while, bankrupting our kids) can all go straight to hell.

Rainmaker
09-07-2014, 02:54 PM
Gnomesayin Stalwart?

sandsjames
09-07-2014, 02:59 PM
I think they'll run into bigger losses than the 2 billion they mention. Last week a buddy of mine needed a pack of smokes...there was a CVS and a Walgreens across the street. He normally would have used CVS, but went to Walgreens because of the cigarettes. He also picked up several other items while there. That's extra loss.

Absinthe Anecdote
09-07-2014, 03:23 PM
Dropping tobacco products isn't hypocritical. But, A corporation being chosen to receive billions of middle class tax dollars to prop up an unsustainable government bureaucratic disaster is hypocritcal. Maybe if .gov had spent the 6.5 Trillion dollars that Obamacare is projected to add to the deficit on recreating a manufacturing base. people would have jobs that actually paid a living wage and be able to afford insurance. Or companies might actually have to offer benefits like health care and pensions again in order to attract employees. Obamacare is the biggest crony, corporate, crook handout in history and has nothing to do with helping poor people and the red-team/ blue team assholes that gave us this shit show, so they can line their own pockets (while, bankrupting our kids) can all go straight to hell.

Ah!

I think I get it...

While the CVS decision to drop tobacco isn't a reason to cry hypocrisy, it is an occasion to bust out a hybrid Libertarian/Tea Party tambourine and start chanting the "hopelessly broken government" song.

Got it!

By the way, you are losing serious "street cred" each time you step out of character like that.

Tsk, Tsk...

Rainmaker
09-07-2014, 03:23 PM
I think they'll run into bigger losses than the 2 billion they mention. Last week a buddy of mine needed a pack of smokes...there was a CVS and a Walgreens across the street. He normally would have used CVS, but went to Walgreens because of the cigarettes. He also picked up several other items while there. That's extra loss.

Agree. Wallgreens sales are about to skyrocket. long as they keep carryin swisher sweets, arizona ice-tea and purple skittles to go with it. just swipe your obama care or ebt card and it's free bitchez!

Rainmaker
09-07-2014, 03:30 PM
Got to excuse Rainmaker. He had a rough nite. loss all his money at his local parimutuel gambling facilities. Rainmaker don't like Libertarians. Their platforms ok. but, with the open border thing. It don't work. we can't have a functioning country without any white people left in it. Thanks for keepin it reel abs.

Stalwart
09-07-2014, 04:20 PM
Can you imagine if we were all sitting around the local watering hole on a early evening discussing this using our online persona? Imagine the looks of the average passer by.

Absinthe Anecdote
09-07-2014, 04:35 PM
Can you imagine if we were all sitting around the local watering hole on a early evening discussing this using our online persona? Imagine the looks of the average passer by.

Yes, I can and it sounds like a lot of fun.

efmbman
09-07-2014, 05:31 PM
Can you imagine if we were all sitting around the local watering hole on a early evening discussing this using our online persona? Imagine the looks of the average passer by.


Yes, I can and it sounds like a lot of fun.

I would want to video tape it... especially if Rusty was there.

garhkal
09-07-2014, 09:09 PM
Seriously? Imagine the lawsuit and "trampled rights" of those workers. They have a right to be as obese as they wish and their employer cannot mandate anything that may benefit the health of the workforce or lower long-term healthcare costs. That may inadvertently create a new protected class.

I know some health care facilities in texas (iirc) tried the tactic of not hiring fatso's cause it went against the image of a health care worker. So it has been done. Can't remember right now though if they got successfully sued or not.


I think they'll run into bigger losses than the 2 billion they mention. Last week a buddy of mine needed a pack of smokes...there was a CVS and a Walgreens across the street. He normally would have used CVS, but went to Walgreens because of the cigarettes. He also picked up several other items while there. That's extra loss.

Combine that with often i find walgreens open longer than most CVS's i have passed, if i need a quick late night shopping trip, i often hit them (well unless i can get to a walmart closer).