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sandsjames
09-05-2014, 03:14 PM
http://www.cnn.com/2014/09/05/opinion/kralovec-ban-homework/index.html?hpt=hp_t3

Interesting article with obvious differing views. I mainly wanted to point out one paragraph to comment on:

"Parents who want to connect personally in meaningful ways with their children after a long day at their job would do well to remember that they have a right to family time uninterrupted by homework."

I bring up this part because it seems ridiculous. IMO, helping young children is a GREAT way for a parent to "connect" personally with their children. It can easily be part of family time. Family time that actually helps the development of their children.

Measure Man
09-05-2014, 03:48 PM
http://www.cnn.com/2014/09/05/opinion/kralovec-ban-homework/index.html?hpt=hp_t3

Interesting article with obvious differing views. I mainly wanted to point out one paragraph to comment on:

"Parents who want to connect personally in meaningful ways with their children after a long day at their job would do well to remember that they have a right to family time uninterrupted by homework."

I bring up this part because it seems ridiculous. IMO, helping young children is a GREAT way for a parent to "connect" personally with their children. It can easily be part of family time. Family time that actually helps the development of their children.

I agree that helping kids with homework is excellent bonding time for parent and child. Even now as my kids are older, they still remember those times. Projects were the best...like building dioramas or science projects! Even just checking homework and knowing what they are learning in school opens a lot of connections for other times...like you could be driving in the car and find out-of-state license plates and ask the capitols, etc. Finding ways to bring the lessons into everyday life...weighing cold cuts at the deli, making change, computing gas mileage, driving distance/time, finding spelling words on road signs or on TV etc.

The bane of our schools is "greater standardization and accountability for schools"...greater standardization means appealing to the lowest common denominator, and accountability for schools usually means high-pressure standardized testing which limits creativity and foundational learning, I think...forcing the teachers to simply make sure the kids know facts for this years tests rather than building a foundation of "learning to think"

As far as homework...some of it is necessary. Learning math, I think, for most people takes practice...more practice than you can do in class that would take away from the teaching time...vocabulary/spelling, too. Lectures in other subjects are just way more effective if the kids have read the chapters ahead of time, at least.

The point about inequality is interesting though...I'm not sure NOT assigning homework to bring the better-home children down to the lesser-home children is a good answer. Lines up with my theory that "bad schools" are not bad because of the school, but because of what they have to work with. Not that the kids are bad...but, they come from homes that do not value education as highly, so there is less home emphasis and lower performance...but then we keep firing teachers for that low performance.

Stalwart
09-05-2014, 05:20 PM
I bring up this part because it seems ridiculous. IMO, helping young children is a GREAT way for a parent to "connect" personally with their children. It can easily be part of family time. Family time that actually helps the development of their children.

Agreed, just because it isn't XBox doesn't mean it isn't good family time. My daughter (who is 4) has 3 hours of week of speech therapy, she is very happy and right now the lessons are almost like play. Right now this is some of the best bonding / family time we have & it is helping her with her speech difficulties and learning English (I wish I could speak Chinese to help her retain that.) She also loves to help cook. I enjoy cooking (find it relaxing) & I hope as she get's older this is something we still do together ... and since we have to eat it is kind of productive too.

Measure Man
09-05-2014, 05:37 PM
Agreed, just because it isn't XBox doesn't mean it isn't good family time. My daughter (who is 4) has 3 hours of week of speech therapy, she is very happy and right now the lessons are almost like play. Right now this is some of the best bonding / family time we have & it is helping her with her speech difficulties and learning English (I wish I could speak Chinese to help her retain that.) She also loves to help cook. I enjoy cooking (find it relaxing) & I hope as she get's older this is something we still do together ... and since we have to eat it is kind of productive too.

When I was a kid, my younger brother went to a speech pathologist. One of his difficulties, among others, was the TH sound. One of his exercises went like this:

I Thhhink I'll have some turkey
I Thhhink I'll have some pie
I Thhhink I'll some cranberries
And Thhhen I Thhhink I'll try
To stay away from turkey
To stay away from pie
To stay away from cranberries
My tummy will ache Thhhat's why.

This little exercise became pounded into all of our heads through the repetition he had to do...now, 40 years later it is still a family anthem that is recited every Thanksgiving.

Now, when my brother actually said it back when he was 5 or 6...after concentrating so hard on all the 'Thhhhink's that by the time he got to the last line, he must've thought exercise was over, so that line would alsways be "Dat's why!"....which is now how we all say it.

Fond memories.

garhkal
09-05-2014, 06:47 PM
http://www.cnn.com/2014/09/05/opinion/kralovec-ban-homework/index.html?hpt=hp_t3

Interesting article with obvious differing views. I mainly wanted to point out one paragraph to comment on:

"Parents who want to connect personally in meaningful ways with their children after a long day at their job would do well to remember that they have a right to family time uninterrupted by homework."

I bring up this part because it seems ridiculous. IMO, helping young children is a GREAT way for a parent to "connect" personally with their children. It can easily be part of family time. Family time that actually helps the development of their children.

I remember back in the 80s while i was in school, that people were pushing for parents to help out MORE with homework, as bonding time. Guess the age old adage of this study will always get invalidated by the following one is spot on.

socal1200r
09-09-2014, 04:38 PM
My daughters are 22 and 19, and when they were in grade school and middle school, I couldn't believe how much homework they were getting. I certainly don't remember getting that much when I was going to school. There is life outside of school, and kids need this time for extracurricular activities, be it sports, music, etc. I'm a firm believer in just extending the school day by an hour, and not sending them home with ANY homework. That way, when they leave school, THEY LEAVE SCHOOL, and are free to enjoy outside activities, which are just as essential for their development as what they are taught and learn during the school day.

garhkal
09-09-2014, 07:24 PM
My daughters are 22 and 19, and when they were in grade school and middle school, I couldn't believe how much homework they were getting. I certainly don't remember getting that much when I was going to school. There is life outside of school, and kids need this time for extracurricular activities, be it sports, music, etc. I'm a firm believer in just extending the school day by an hour, and not sending them home with ANY homework. That way, when they leave school, THEY LEAVE SCHOOL, and are free to enjoy outside activities, which are just as essential for their development as what they are taught and learn during the school day.

I know in England back in the mid 80s, there was a push in our local area by parents to do just that. Extend school 1-2 hours, so there wouldn't be any homework. Didn't fly with the school boards.