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technomage1
04-27-2014, 12:41 PM
Soooo...going back in time a bit here....and dating myself...

In 1983 a young techno was a pretty avid gamer, though it wasn't until 1986 that I received my first console, the Atari 7800. Back in those days I used to ride my bike down to the arcade and pump quarters into the likes of Wizard of Wor (not misspelled), Frogger, Asteriods, and Ms. Pac-Man. In 1983, Atari released millions of copies of the game "ET" for the 2600. Like most movie tie in games then and now, it wasn't very good. Some have called it the worst game of all time, though having picked up a copy in 1987 at Odd Lots for chump change (and thus having acutally played it) I disagree. It wasn't great but to me the title of worst game probably goes to Fantavision. Anyway, Atari lost its shirt on the millions of these cartridges that didn't sell and - as was widely reported at the time - dumped 14 truckloads of games into a landfill and tried to move on.

So 31 years pass and what was a commonly known fact became a "legend" and a "mystery". People for some reason began to doubt the dump actually occured. The remaining Atari employees didn't know one way or another if it was true, which didn't help matters, and no one involved wanted to admit to it - even if they were asked.

So yesterday they dug up the landfill and - gasp - found a ton of old Atari cartridges - some still worked even. "Mystery" solved. I was irratated a commonly known fact was even up to debate.

It just goes to show you how sometimes people can question things that acutally happened.

Capt Alfredo
04-27-2014, 03:16 PM
Yeah, next thing you know people will be questioning whether a plane crashed into the Pentagon.

TJMAC77SP
04-27-2014, 04:05 PM
Yeah, next thing you know people will be questioning whether a plane crashed into the Pentagon.


..............................:spit............... ........

Rusty Jones
04-28-2014, 01:38 PM
In 1983 a young techno was a pretty avid gamer, though it wasn't until 1986 that I received my first console, the Atari 7800...

...It just goes to show you how sometimes people can question things that acutally happened.

Like someone having actually bought an Atari 7800. Well... I can actually believe that, since I knew one kid in my neighborhood who had it. I remember trying to play Double Dragon on that thing... man, it was horrible. The Atari 7800 is not some "gem" that went undiscovered by the masses, as that honor would go to the Sega Master System. The Atari 7800 was overlooked for good reason - not only was it bad, but people expected it to be after their experience with the Atari 5200.

Anyhow... seeing is believing. Everyone is that way... maybe not in all cases, but in at least some of them. If you want them to believe something, you have to show them. Was there any footage of the cartridges being dumped? Maybe a few loose cartrides laying around that got missed after the burial? Any evidence of some sort? If burying those cartridges was a crime, would the prosecution have been able to prove guilt without the cartridges being dug up?

I remember in May of 2011, when it was announced that Osama Bin Laden was caught and killed. How many of you didn't buy that, especially when there were no pictures of a dead body?

technomage1
04-28-2014, 02:14 PM
Like someone having actually bought an Atari 7800. Well... I can actually believe that, since I knew one kid in my neighborhood who had it. I remember trying to play Double Dragon on that thing... man, it was horrible. The Atari 7800 is not some "gem" that went undiscovered by the masses, as that honor would go to the Sega Master System. The Atari 7800 was overlooked for good reason - not only was it bad, but people expected it to be after their experience with the Atari 5200.

I got it as a gift for Christmas. I never asked for such an expensive gift, but my uncle bought it for me. I played the heck out of it and loved it. The controllers weren't the greatest, they hurt your hands after hours of gameplay, but the really nice thing was at that point all the 2600 cartridges were getting discounted, so I could get a ton of great games for peanuts. Aside from the controllers I never noticed anything else bad about the system itself. It had a decent library and as I noted was backwards compatible with the 2600.

I don't know if I would call it a gem or not - I never had anything other than the arcade to compare it to. I can only speak from my experience that I enjoyed it and it set me on a lifetime of gaming. My next system came in 1992 - the Sega Genesis.

Fun factoid for the younger folks - 1986 was also the year my uncle bought us our first microwave.

retiredAFcivvy
04-28-2014, 04:42 PM
Soooo...going back in time a bit here....and dating myself...

In 1983 a young techno was a pretty avid gamer, though it wasn't until 1986 that I received my first console, the Atari 7800. Back in those days I used to ride my bike down to the arcade and pump quarters into the likes of Wizard of Wor (not misspelled), Frogger, Asteriods, and Ms. Pac-Man. In 1983, Atari released millions of copies of the game "ET" for the 2600. Like most movie tie in games then and now, it wasn't very good. Some have called it the worst game of all time, though having picked up a copy in 1987 at Odd Lots for chump change (and thus having acutally played it) I disagree. It wasn't great but to me the title of worst game probably goes to Fantavision. Anyway, Atari lost its shirt on the millions of these cartridges that didn't sell and - as was widely reported at the time - dumped 14 truckloads of games into a landfill and tried to move on.

So 31 years pass and what was a commonly known fact became a "legend" and a "mystery". People for some reason began to doubt the dump actually occured. The remaining Atari employees didn't know one way or another if it was true, which didn't help matters, and no one involved wanted to admit to it - even if they were asked.

So yesterday they dug up the landfill and - gasp - found a ton of old Atari cartridges - some still worked even. "Mystery" solved. I was irratated a commonly known fact was even up to debate.

It just goes to show you how sometimes people can question things that acutally happened.
My kids started with Pong. Now that's a dinosaur.

Measure Man
04-28-2014, 05:19 PM
My kids started with Pong. Now that's a dinosaur.

I remember playing Pong at the grocery store, when the game had actually physical "paddles" and a spring-loaded "ball" that bounced between them...they lit up against a black screen and appeared somewhat like a video game.

It was broken more often than not.

Rusty Jones
04-28-2014, 06:40 PM
I remember playing Pong at the grocery store, when the game had actually physical "paddles" and a spring-loaded "ball" that bounced between them...they lit up against a black screen and appeared somewhat like a video game.

It was broken more often than not.

I miss the days when grocery stores and convenience stores had video games. I remember when convenience stores, blocks way and farther from closer ones, got a new game... and my friends and I would hop on our bikes to go play it. I remember passing one 7-Eleven in order to get to one that had Michael Jackson's Moonwalker, and then both of THOSE 7-Elevens plus another in order to get to a grocery store that had Street Fighter II when it came out. I moved out of town a year later, and had friends writing me telling me how they rode their bikes to an arcade that was twice the distance of that grocery store, because they had Mortal Kombat.

Around those times, however, inflation had finally hit the arcade game industry, and started costing 50 cents to play, when it was only a quarter the year before.

If you were ever a fan of the Double Dragon series, Double Dragon 3 hurt your pockets worse than any game in history - you only got one life, and you couldn't "stun" your opponents to get a combo in like most side scrolling beat 'em ups (making the game far more difficult, resulting in you pumping in more quarters), and you actually had to pop more quarters into the machine in order to get weapons (in most games, you knock them from the enemies' hands to pick them up), and pop in more quarters to get the special moves - which go away after you lose a life, forcing you to repurchase them. And the game was virtually unplayable without those moves!

Then Daytona USA came out in 1994 - that game costed a whole dollar to play! And you couldn't even finish the race unless you hit certain marks at certain times to pick up time extensions... otherwise, you'd have to pop in four more quarters to continue. And that became the standard for racing games after that.

Arcade gaming by that time was no longer kid-friendly in terms of prices.

Measure Man
04-28-2014, 07:12 PM
Then Daytona USA came out in 1994 - that game costed a whole dollar to play! And you couldn't even finish the race unless you hit certain marks at certain times to pick up time extensions... otherwise, you'd have to pop in four more quarters to continue. And that became the standard for racing games after that.

Arcade gaming by that time was no longer kid-friendly in terms of prices.

I used to love Pole Position...that was the shit back in the 80s.

There was another racing game that 4 people could play at once...you all stood around looking down on the track and each had a car...ha ha, so much fun at the Jersey shore!

Rusty Jones
04-28-2014, 07:16 PM
I used to love Pole Position...that was the shit back in the 80s.

There was another racing game that 4 people could play at once...you all stood around looking down on the track and each had a car...ha ha, so much fun at the Jersey shore!

Ivan Stewart's Off-Road?

meatbringer
04-29-2014, 06:48 PM
Man, reading these really makes me miss arcades. Good times. The kids whose parents had some money would have their birthday party at the arcade in the mall. Sometimes if I got invited to one, my parents would hook me up with a roll of quarters. It felt like I had won the lottery. Everything seemed so much cooler when you were a kid.

Anyways, it's all about Altered Beast and the original Double Dragon for me. Also, when that huge X-men arcade machine came out, I almost sh*t myself as a kid.

raider8169
04-29-2014, 07:54 PM
I remember beating the X-men game once, it took more money than I would like to admite but than again I played it after everyone else quit when it was near the last boss.

I still have a working 2600 at my moms. I dont have the paddle joysticks but I loved the game dodge'em and pitfall. I never did beat pitfall and I thought it just went on forever.

meatbringer
04-30-2014, 06:27 PM
I vaguely remember my Atari, but I do remember the one tank game that I had for it. I believe it was just titled "Tanks." The game was nothing more than two tanks against a blue screen. It was just two pixelated messes that would roll onto screen and you could shoot at one another until one tank won the battle. I thought it was the greatest thing imagineable at the time.

AJBIGJ
04-30-2014, 06:44 PM
Like someone having actually bought an Atari 7800. Well... I can actually believe that, since I knew one kid in my neighborhood who had it. I remember trying to play Double Dragon on that thing... man, it was horrible. The Atari 7800 is not some "gem" that went undiscovered by the masses, as that honor would go to the Sega Master System. The Atari 7800 was overlooked for good reason - not only was it bad, but people expected it to be after their experience with the Atari 5200.

Anyhow... seeing is believing. Everyone is that way... maybe not in all cases, but in at least some of them. If you want them to believe something, you have to show them. Was there any footage of the cartridges being dumped? Maybe a few loose cartrides laying around that got missed after the burial? Any evidence of some sort? If burying those cartridges was a crime, would the prosecution have been able to prove guilt without the cartridges being dug up?

I remember in May of 2011, when it was announced that Osama Bin Laden was caught and killed. How many of you didn't buy that, especially when there were no pictures of a dead body?

Totally agree on the SMS, no opinion on the Atari because I never played any of its variants. The end boss of "Zillion" actually gave me nightmares when I was younger, totally didn't see it coming the first time!

Rusty Jones
04-30-2014, 07:08 PM
Totally agree on the SMS, no opinion on the Atari because I never played any of its variants. The end boss of "Zillion" actually gave me nightmares when I was younger, totally didn't see it coming the first time!

The Atari 7800 was the last Atari console I've played. I've watched other people play the Atari Jaguar and the Atari Lynx on the demo stands at Software Etc (the name of the store, before they changed it to "Game Stop"), but with the extremely high prices of those things (IIRC, the Atari Jaguar was $700 when it came out, same with the 3DO) - combined with the fact that the word "Atari" was synonymous with "primitive" by that point - we all knew that Atari was going down. And, of course, it did. We already knew that the Sony PlayStation and the Sega Saturn were going to be way better. And cheaper.

Rusty Jones
04-30-2014, 07:30 PM
I remember beating the X-men game once, it took more money than I would like to admite but than again I played it after everyone else quit when it was near the last boss.

I've only played that once, but I remember the first two arcade games I've beaten: Golden Axe and Final Fight. I think it took me almost five bucks to beat Golden Axe, but with Final Fight? Let's just say, I knew a kid on the block that no one liked... and he would always steal money out of his mom's purse. I was only one of the few kids in the neighborhood that knew he did this, so he'd have no problem taking me on a spending spree with the money he stole from his mom.

I would probably guess that took us a total of $20 to beat Final Fight, but then again... with the "unlimited" supply of quarters that we had, we weren't exactly careful with how we played the game.


Anyways, it's all about Altered Beast and the original Double Dragon for me. Also, when that huge X-men arcade machine came out, I almost sh*t myself as a kid.

Ah yes, the original Double Dragon. Of course, once you learn the elbow trick, you could easily elbow your way through the game with one quarter. Well, for some. It takes me three quarters.

I loved the side scrolling games with four players. Remember Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles and the Simpsons? About a year before X-Men came out, there was an Avengers game as well which was four players.

Another game I loved as a child that was out at the same time as Double Dragon and Altered Beasts was Bad Dudes. I didn't beat the game until I downloaded the MAME emulator, and then I was pissed at the ended. You go through all these levels of ninjas throwing stars at you, getting burned by fire-breathing fatasses, getting mauled by German Shepherds, beating up a ninja who turns into five ninjas, fighting people on top of speeding trucks and trains... all in order to save Ronald Reagan.
The reward? He takes you out for a burger. But then again, who's surprised?

Stalwart
04-30-2014, 07:37 PM
Defender & Galaxa were my favorites.

I liked Dragon's Lair, it was a series of random cartoon scenes on laser disc. Had the hardest time beating it and getting to the ending.

meatbringer
04-30-2014, 07:41 PM
Ah yes, the original Double Dragon. Of course, once you learn the elbow trick, you could easily elbow your way through the game with one quarter. Well, for some. It takes me three quarters.

I loved the side scrolling games with four players. Remember Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles and the Simpsons? About a year before X-Men came out, there was an Avengers game as well which was four players.

Another game I loved as a child that was out at the same time as Double Dragon and Altered Beasts was Bad Dudes. I didn't beat the game until I downloaded the MAME emulator, and then I was pissed at the ended. You go through all these levels of ninjas throwing stars at you, getting burned by fire-breathing fatasses, getting mauled by German Shepherds, beating up a ninja who turns into five ninjas, fighting people on top of speeding trucks and trains... all in order to save Ronald Reagan.
The reward? He takes you out for a burger. But then again, who's surprised?

HA! I remember the ending to Bad Dudes! I also remember the opening to the game: "The president has been kidnapped by ninjas. Are you a bad enough dude to rescue him?"

All of the games you mentioned were great, and you can get most of them on XBox Live Arcade now. I am not sure as to whether or not you can get the Avengers game, though. Another really good game was the sequel they made to Golden Axe for the arcade. Man, you guys have opened the floodgates to all my old memories of badass arcade games. Now all we have to do is figure out how we can all argue about this subject.

meatbringer
04-30-2014, 07:43 PM
Defender & Galaxa were my favorites.

I liked Dragon's Lair, it was a series of random cartoon scenes on laser disc. Had the hardest time beating it and getting to the ending.

So many people raved about Dragon's Lair since it was the first of its kind. I remember dropping a few dollars into the game as a wee lad, but I obviously didn't understand how to play it. After immediately dying after I put money in, I simply gave up.

Rusty Jones
04-30-2014, 07:55 PM
Oh, here's one - Pit Fighter. Remember that one? It was probably the most realistic looking game out at the time. Still, to this day, with the most realist scenario; as the even the spectators would kick and punch you if you got close enough to outter edges of the fighting area.

I also liked all of the NEO-GEO arcade machines. If you unplugged one and plugged it back in, you got to play a game for free. I remember a friend and I doing that for a good hour at one 7-Eleven, before the woman working there caught us and ran us out of the store.

Stalwart
04-30-2014, 07:56 PM
So many people raved about Dragon's Lair since it was the first of its kind. I remember dropping a few dollars into the game as a wee lad, but I obviously didn't understand how to play it. After immediately dying after I put money in, I simply gave up.

It took a while to figure out what you were supposed to do ... and even then if you didn't react quickly enough (sometimes ridiculously quick) you died.

There was another one like it, based on space but I can't recall the name of it.

meatbringer
04-30-2014, 08:05 PM
Oh, here's one - Pit Fighter. Remember that one? It was probably the most realistic looking game out at the time. Still, to this day, with the most realist scenario; as the even the spectators would kick and punch you if you got close enough to outter edges of the fighting area.

Yeah, I remember Pit Fighter. I think that was the first game that ever used the real actors as characters. It was definitely the first one I ever saw. You could almost say that Pit Fighter revolutionized games by being the first to do that. They did that well before Mortal Kombat. Another fighting game that sticks out in my mind is the one Karate game where you control the dude with only two joysticks. It's the same game that Van Damme plays in "Bloodsport." I was thrilled a few years ago when I was stationed in Italy and found the game in a small restaurant. I had forgotten how difficult playing it was. Games back then were so brutal and unforgiving.

Rusty Jones
04-30-2014, 08:22 PM
Another one of my favorites... I can't even remember what it's called. I think it's TWA: Taito Wrestling Association. You have different characters to choose, and they all looked like wrestlers in the WWF and NWA at the time.

What I remember most about the game was the audience. Superman, Dath Vader, ZZ Top, Elvis, and a couple of other American icons made up the whole audience.

MACHINE666
05-01-2014, 05:10 AM
Soooo...going back in time a bit here....and dating myself...

In 1983 a young techno was a pretty avid gamer, though it wasn't until 1986 that I received my first console, the Atari 7800. Back in those days I used to ride my bike down to the arcade and pump quarters into the likes of Wizard of Wor (not misspelled), Frogger, Asteriods, and Ms. Pac-Man. In 1983, Atari released millions of copies of the game "ET" for the 2600. Like most movie tie in games then and now, it wasn't very good. Some have called it the worst game of all time, though having picked up a copy in 1987 at Odd Lots for chump change (and thus having acutally played it) I disagree. It wasn't great but to me the title of worst game probably goes to Fantavision. Anyway, Atari lost its shirt on the millions of these cartridges that didn't sell and - as was widely reported at the time - dumped 14 truckloads of games into a landfill and tried to move on.

So 31 years pass and what was a commonly known fact became a "legend" and a "mystery". People for some reason began to doubt the dump actually occured. The remaining Atari employees didn't know one way or another if it was true, which didn't help matters, and no one involved wanted to admit to it - even if they were asked.

So yesterday they dug up the landfill and - gasp - found a ton of old Atari cartridges - some still worked even. "Mystery" solved. I was irratated a commonly known fact was even up to debate.

It just goes to show you how sometimes people can question things that acutally happened.


The original E.T. game for the Atari 2600 was programmed and on shelves in something like 6 weeks. I remember reading an article where the game designer responsible for such a task literally had a garbage pail next to his desk to catch his vomit, he was that on-edge about the whole under-taking.

Visually speaking, E.T. looked great, compared to games like Atari 2600 Pac-Man. Lush forest greens, vibrant bright colors and some what detailed characters made traversing the 8 basic screens a real treat at the time. Game play was rudimentary, but when you're 10 years old, you really don't know the difference, and accept what the gaming gods have placed before you. Many people blame E.T. for the Video Game Crash of 1985 (also known as the Video Game Crash of 1983 if you're a purist), however that truly belongs to Atari Pac-Man. Boy, what a stinker. E.T. gets scapegoated all too often for Pac-Man's sins of a crap brown maze, pee-colored yellow ghosts, brick-looking wafers (not the original dots from the arcade game), and for bonus points, a shit-sandwich brown and yellow vitamin, where the cherry, strawberry, orange and a list of other items would appear in the center screen. Add crappy sound effects and ham-fisted response on the joystick, and hands down, Atari Pac-Man was the worst game of all time.

If there is any good that came from Atari's demise, it was that it paved the way for Nintendo to re-boot the video game console industry in the US in 1986, thus giving us a faithful recreation of the Super Mario Brothers arcade game, eventually restoring consumer confidence in such an awesome industry.

Rusty Jones
05-01-2014, 12:06 PM
The original E.T. game for the Atari 2600 was programmed and on shelves in something like 6 weeks. I remember reading an article where the game designer responsible for such a task literally had a garbage pail next to his desk to catch his vomit, he was that on-edge about the whole under-taking.

Visually speaking, E.T. looked great, compared to games like Atari 2600 Pac-Man. Lush forest greens, vibrant bright colors and some what detailed characters made traversing the 8 basic screens a real treat at the time. Game play was rudimentary, but when you're 10 years old, you really don't know the difference, and accept what the gaming gods have placed before you. Many people blame E.T. for the Video Game Crash of 1985 (also known as the Video Game Crash of 1983 if you're a purist), however that truly belongs to Atari Pac-Man. Boy, what a stinker. E.T. gets scapegoated all too often for Pac-Man's sins of a crap brown maze, pee-colored yellow ghosts, brick-looking wafers (not the original dots from the arcade game), and for bonus points, a shit-sandwich brown and yellow vitamin, where the cherry, strawberry, orange and a list of other items would appear in the center screen. Add crappy sound effects and ham-fisted response on the joystick, and hands down, Atari Pac-Man was the worst game of all time.

If there is any good that came from Atari's demise, it was that it paved the way for Nintendo to re-boot the video game console industry in the US in 1986, thus giving us a faithful recreation of the Super Mario Brothers arcade game, eventually restoring consumer confidence in such an awesome industry.

Some believe that Pac-Man is to blame, and... I dunno. I actually didn't think that Pac-Man on the Atari 2600 was really that bad, considering the console's limitations. Pac-Man was also available on the Atari 5200, and that version was pretty faithful to the arcade version - in other words, if you wanted to play something close the arcade version at home, it WAS available.

Even the Atari 2600 itself had some graphically superior competition. Intellivision, anyone?

Stalwart
05-01-2014, 01:24 PM
PacMan on the 2600 was not great. instead of PacMan being round, it was almost like a pixilated square turned on its side ... very sad.

I remember the Yar's Revenge game had a huge build up, and came with a mini-comic that explained the background and story to the game ... which was good because the game was really ... really simple / boring.

Pitfall was neat too, kind of piggy backing on the Raiders of the Lost Ark popularity ... and it had crocodiles.

Capt Alfredo
05-01-2014, 09:24 PM
Intellivision had good games, but the controller was a monstrosity.

Measure Man
05-01-2014, 09:56 PM
Intellivision had good games, but the controller was a monstrosity.

Their baseball game was awesome...pretended to be friends with a kid for 2 years just we could go over his house and play that game.

Capt Alfredo
05-01-2014, 10:33 PM
Their baseball game was awesome...pretended to be friends with a kid for 2 years just we could go over his house and play that game.

I remember the Advanced Dungeons and Dragons game as being fun, but it's probably nostalgia. That and the Battleship game.

Measure Man
05-01-2014, 10:39 PM
I remember the Advanced Dungeons and Dragons game as being fun.

:confused2:

:der

:smashfreakB:

Capt Alfredo
05-01-2014, 10:41 PM
You don't remember it?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Advanced_Dungeons_%26_Dragons:_Cloudy_Mountain


:confused2:

:der

:smashfreakB:

Measure Man
05-01-2014, 10:43 PM
You don't remember it?

No, I had friends as a kid.