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spirit_eyes
04-05-2014, 09:50 PM
I don't like that people who are discharged due to medical, are called " retired".
I did 20 years ad, and I EARNED that title. Sorry you got hurt, and could' finish your time. But you're the same as me? Nope.

imnohero
04-05-2014, 10:39 PM
Got a burr under your blanket, Spirit? :)

Did something happen that brought this on?

spirit_eyes
04-05-2014, 10:47 PM
You folks said no one was talking on here. Let's see how long until the mods don't like it.

And it's on old burr under my blanket.

Gonzo432
04-06-2014, 01:57 AM
This does seem like a good subject to start a discussion.
As a 20+ year retiree, I must say when I see (Ret) after a low rank or retired associated with someone who looks WAY too young to be "blue-ID mafia", it does get my attention. Most of the time it's when I'm watching the Military Channel or the Military History Channel. When it's the PFC who defended Wake Island and became a POW or a Ranger who was medically retired after Mogadishu? I have no issue with the letters R-E-T following their former rank.

With that said, there is a certain 17-year SSgt who was medically retired in 1996 (who sewed on SSgt a week before I entered the USAF and I was a TSgt and this individual's supervisor) that if I saw this waste of human flesh on TV with SSgt, (Ret) USAF on the screen I'd need a new TV since that one would have had a brick thrown through it, and I'd have thrown it into the street, then the pond, then back into the street.

Stalwart
04-06-2014, 02:28 AM
This does seem like a good subject to start a discussion.
As a 20+ year retiree, I must say when I see (Ret) after a low rank or retired associated with someone who looks WAY too young to be "blue-ID mafia", it does get my attention. Most of the time it's when I'm watching the Military Channel or the Military History Channel. When it's the PFC who defended Wake Island and became a POW or a Ranger who was medically retired after Mogadishu? I have no issue with the letters R-E-T following their former rank.

Am going on my 24th year; feel the same way.

imnohero
04-06-2014, 05:11 AM
I don't understand why this sort of thing bothers you. is it just that they didn't "earn" the retired moniker? That "retired" should be reserved for those that complete a certain number of years of service? What about the TERA people...did they earn being called "retired"? Gonza wants to differentiate between "medically retired" based on combat injuries, and those who just line of duty.

I'm not trying to belittle your feeling, Spirit, it just seems like a small thing to be uspet about.

spirit_eyes
04-06-2014, 01:48 PM
There IS a difference between medically retired, and retired from active duty. I would be happy with " med ret" instead of "ret". I earned the right to put " usn ret" after my name ( which I rarely do). And " med ret" would let folks know the difference.

FLAPS, USAF (ret)
04-06-2014, 02:21 PM
I saw a suburban with Handicap plates park in a movie theater handicap spot. Out comes an adult female and four young teens, all who walked briskly into the theater so they wouldn't miss the show.

I guess the parking spot is for the vehicle with the plate, rather than the handicap owner, (who obviously was not the driver)? Nice example to set for the kids!

USMC0341
04-06-2014, 02:29 PM
Why stop there? Why not distinguish between those who were a desk jockey their entire career, or those that were ground pounders, or pilots etc...

Just so I understand, the Marine who has put in 5 combat tours and came home from the last one without the same body parts he left with, isn't on the same playing field as the finance guy/gal that showed up and sat at a desk for 20? Because that magical "20 years" means the "ret." was earned, versus "given" to someone who was med retired?

I imagine this wasn't what you were referring to, but rather those who bent over to lift a box of files and ruptured a disc and ended up being med retired with only a couple years under their belt.

Slippery slope when you try to start figuring out who "earned" their retirement moniker.

spirit_eyes
04-06-2014, 02:32 PM
Ok, "ret" for 20. " med ret" for being screwed up. " com ret" for combat screwed up.

Vrake
04-06-2014, 02:44 PM
You can put Mortimer T Jackass after my name as long as that retirement check hits every month. My blue id says TRICARE and the payment is hitting I'm good.

I think retired is retired and once they hit a certain age who will be able to tell the difference anyways.

BENDER56
04-06-2014, 03:19 PM
Ok, "ret" for 20. " med ret" for being screwed up. " com ret" for combat screwed up.

... and "26-year ret but was never in harms way," for me, I guess.

I'm with USMC0341 on this. I can imagine lots of multiple-combat-tour veterans would look at my career and think, "Wait. This guy gets a lifetime pension and all I get is a lifelong fight with the VA? What's up with that?".

Yeah, I "deployed". One was a two month vacation in the Peruvian Amazon and the other two were to al Udeid. Not only was I never in harms way, but for 26 years the AF paid me a living wage (really), paid me to travel all over the world, shipped all my stuff to be with me -- most times even sent my family along -- gave me a job to do when I got there and gave me a place to live and a community of Americans to hang out with. And on top of that I'm now getting a lifetime annuity which, if I had to invest enough to pay it out, would require me to have invested somewhere around $750K or more.

Life's not fair. The retiree rules are what they are.

That said, if it really sticks in your craw, get politically active and start a consensus to change the designations -- or even the rules on who can and cannot receive a retirement pension.

spirit_eyes
04-06-2014, 03:31 PM
It's not the check that bothers me. It's the silly " hmsn ret" "Pfc ret", etc that is what bothers me.

Vrake
04-06-2014, 03:52 PM
Not to be that guy Spirit,

I have seen the debates here on length of time since retirement vs final rank at retirement in terms of "retiree rank" It seems most everyone fell into "you're retired what's the difference?" camp.

**edited I'm in the just retired camp that's enough for me.

Gonzo432
04-06-2014, 04:58 PM
I don't understand why this sort of thing bothers you. is it just that they didn't "earn" the retired moniker? That "retired" should be reserved for those that complete a certain number of years of service? What about the TERA people...did they earn being called "retired"? Gonza wants to differentiate between "medically retired" based on combat injuries, and those who just line of duty.

I'm not trying to belittle your feeling, Spirit, it just seems like a small thing to be uspet about.

That's Gonzo, not Gonza (sounds like I'm smoking weed :smokin with the Jamaicans, that's Ganja, close enough)

I said it caught my attention, I wasn't looking for differentiation except for that one idiot SSgt.

imnohero
04-06-2014, 05:33 PM
Apologies for the typo...I've been doing that a lot lately.

MACHINE666
04-06-2014, 09:30 PM
Meh. I'd rather have someone who served time in uniform and get medical retirement bennies as a result of an injury that happened as a result of honorable service, than someone who comes to the country and does nothing to contribute to it. Don't hate because someone's luck is different than yours. Chances are they would gladly forego that medical retirement to have perfect health again.....

Stalwart
04-06-2014, 09:46 PM
I have a good friend who got a Purple Heart for a piece of cinder block wall that was shot up and pierced his shoulder skin and another who is missing parts of his jaw, most of his left calf & his right leg from the knee down -- both got the same recognition (granted my friend with the missing leg is now retired medically as a Sgt, USMC.) Both are still friends and while we joke with the one who got the lesser injury.

I figure if you look around quickly you will find people who got what you got / where you got without 'sacrificing' as much as you. Likewise if you are honest with yourself you will find people who got the same thing you did and 'sacrificed' a lot more. What is important to me is that I did my best to get where I did; I can put my head on my pillow with satisfaction at night.

socal1200r
04-07-2014, 04:13 PM
I read something today about a former USAF drone operator, who "retired" after 5 years, who said he flew missions from his cubicle in New Mexico, and they wouldn't have been able to do their job without Germany's help. Basically, the gist of the article was that Germany was involved with our drone warfare, in that they had ground stations or something in their country, which forwarded the sigint to the States for further analysis and exploitation, which may or may not have resulted in targeted killings. What got my attention was the "retired" after 5 years bit. After reading thru this thread, and that particular article, I've come to the conclusion that in the big picture, "retired" is what they say when the separation is initiated by the service member, regardless of the time served, and "discharged" is what happens when the service initiates it. Like has been said, maybe there needs to be some formal categories, like "ret" (normal, 20+ year retirees), "cret" (combat-related retirees), "mret" (medically-related retirees), and "sep" (anything that doesn't fit the other categories). In this story, that 5-year airman would've been "sep", not "ret". I'd be okay with that, but it just rubs me the wrong way for him to say he's "retired".

sandsjames
04-07-2014, 06:18 PM
I read something today about a former USAF drone operator, who "retired" after 5 years, who said he flew missions from his cubicle in New Mexico, and they wouldn't have been able to do their job without Germany's help. Basically, the gist of the article was that Germany was involved with our drone warfare, in that they had ground stations or something in their country, which forwarded the sigint to the States for further analysis and exploitation, which may or may not have resulted in targeted killings. What got my attention was the "retired" after 5 years bit. After reading thru this thread, and that particular article, I've come to the conclusion that in the big picture, "retired" is what they say when the separation is initiated by the service member, regardless of the time served, and "discharged" is what happens when the service initiates it. Like has been said, maybe there needs to be some formal categories, like "ret" (normal, 20+ year retirees), "cret" (combat-related retirees), "mret" (medically-related retirees), and "sep" (anything that doesn't fit the other categories). In this story, that 5-year airman would've been "sep", not "ret". I'd be okay with that, but it just rubs me the wrong way for him to say he's "retired".

Sounds like a lot of information that may have been protected by the NDA this drone operator signed that probably shouldn't be posted on an internet forum.

jshiver15
04-07-2014, 06:28 PM
I saw a suburban with Handicap plates park in a movie theater handicap spot. Out comes an adult female and four young teens, all who walked briskly into the theater so they wouldn't miss the show.

I guess the parking spot is for the vehicle with the plate, rather than the handicap owner, (who obviously was not the driver)? Nice example to set for the kids!

Is it possible that the handicap individual was dropped off at the front of the theatre? Because I've nearly made that mistake (calling someone out for it). I was going to say something to them as they walked out, but then I saw that the person driving was escorting someone out of the building.

LogDog
04-07-2014, 07:02 PM
I read something today about a former USAF drone operator, who "retired" after 5 years, who said he flew missions from his cubicle in New Mexico, and they wouldn't have been able to do their job without Germany's help. Basically, the gist of the article was that Germany was involved with our drone warfare, in that they had ground stations or something in their country, which forwarded the sigint to the States for further analysis and exploitation, which may or may not have resulted in targeted killings. What got my attention was the "retired" after 5 years bit. After reading thru this thread, and that particular article, I've come to the conclusion that in the big picture, "retired" is what they say when the separation is initiated by the service member, regardless of the time served, and "discharged" is what happens when the service initiates it. Like has been said, maybe there needs to be some formal categories, like "ret" (normal, 20+ year retirees), "cret" (combat-related retirees), "mret" (medically-related retirees), and "sep" (anything that doesn't fit the other categories). In this story, that 5-year airman would've been "sep", not "ret". I'd be okay with that, but it just rubs me the wrong way for him to say he's "retired".
I don't care if they're medically, combat related, or retired after 20 years as long as they earned their retirement honestly and honorably.

Kicker47
04-07-2014, 07:12 PM
Worked with a young SSgt who was medically retired after about 5 years in due to asthma. Less than 2 months later, she was posting all sorts of stuff on facebook about doing P90X and Insanity workouts and what not. Now, I am no doctor, and I understand that there are different types of asthma, and that it can be controlled (to a point), but if you were just medically retired because you were unable to do your job (she worked in Plans & Scheduling), should you really be doing those sorts of workouts? And if a doctor has told you that you can safely do these workouts, how did you get through a Medical Retirement? :confusion:

SENDBILLMONEY
04-11-2014, 10:47 PM
I don't like that people who are discharged due to medical, are called " retired".
I did 20 years ad, and I EARNED that title. Sorry you got hurt, and could' finish your time. But you're the same as me? Nope.

My wife retired for service connected disability at the 17-year mark. On her worst day, my wife is not the same as you. She's much better. She also outranks you. :)

People who are "discharged due to medical" are in fact separated. See 10 U.S.C. § 1203 and 10 U.S.C. § 1206, for example.
People who receive a disability retirement are in fact retired. See 10 U.S.C. § 1201, for example.

If you don't like that she has retired from the United States Air Force under applicable laws and regulations, that's too damned bad.

Back to lurk mode. Bye.