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natethegreat
03-25-2014, 05:43 PM
Yes, this is a bit of a rant, I'm frustrated. I was just told that I could only use acronyms on the 14th AF approved list. So among the acronyms I'm not allowed to use (because they are not listed) are


SAPR - Sexual Assault Prevention and Response program
GPA -Grade Point Average
OJT - On the Job Training
CFC - Combined Federal Campaign
GO - General Officer
AF - Air Force
US - United States

I think someone is going way overboard with acronyms on EPRs.

BISSBOSS
03-25-2014, 05:46 PM
Can you combine them?

Like...

USAF???

-BB-

natethegreat
03-25-2014, 05:55 PM
I'm only allowed to use what is on the list. Luckily my CC is a little more reasonable than his exec & I only had to spell out GPA & GO. It's still really annoying to see an official document that spells out approved acronyms for the DoD, & the AF supplement of that, & then find out I can't use them because the 14th AF's list doesn't include them.

Here are the publications if anyone is interested.

Joint Publication 1-02 Department of Defense Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms, 8 November 2010 (As Amended Through 13 November 2013)

Air Force Supplement to the Department of Defense Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms, Air Force Doctrine 1-02 11 January 2007 (incorporating Change 1, 6 January 2012)

imported_UncommonSense
03-25-2014, 05:59 PM
Yes, this is a bit of a rant, I'm frustrated. I was just told that I could only use acronyms on the 14th AF approved list. So among the acronyms I'm not allowed to use (because they are not listed) are


SAPR - Sexual Assault Prevention and Response program
GPA -Grade Point Average
OJT - On the Job Training
CFC - Combined Federal Campaign
GO - General Officer
AF - Air Force
US - United States

I think someone is going way overboard with acronyms on EPRs.

Fight the good fight and eliminate all acronyms and abbreviations

- Sexual Assault Prevention and Response program member; responded to 12 calls--provided emotional support
- Took three classes; 4.0 grade point average--6 credit-hours from Community College of the Air Force degree
- Blitzed through on the job training; 127 tasks completed--ready for 5-level 6 months ahead of training timeline
- Instills pride in workcenter; sanitized five commodes and sinks--visiting General Officer departed cootie-free


When supervision complains about lack of teeth tell them "because acronyms"

SomeRandomGuy
03-25-2014, 06:21 PM
Yes, this is a bit of a rant, I'm frustrated. I was just told that I could only use acronyms on the 14th AF approved list. So among the acronyms I'm not allowed to use (because they are not listed) are


SAPR - Sexual Assault Prevention and Response program
GPA -Grade Point Average
OJT - On the Job Training
CFC - Combined Federal Campaign
GO - General Officer
AF - Air Force
US - United States

I think someone is going way overboard with acronyms on EPRs.

YGTBSM! They need to GTFO with approved acronyms. Clearly, there is no reason not to speak in acronyms. We all know what IYAAYAS means so obviously we can figure out the rest of these things. For example, a lady I work with told me she is in charge of DTFs in our squadron. I easily figured out that had to mean Down To F*** even though she contends it means Discrepancy Tracking Form.

BOSS302
03-25-2014, 06:32 PM
For example, a lady I work with told me she is in charge of DTFs in our squadron. I easily figured out that had to mean Down To F*** even though she contends it means Discrepancy Tracking Form.


http://cdn.hellogiggles.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/28/thumbsdown.gif

sandsjames
03-25-2014, 06:48 PM
Fight the good fight and eliminate all acronyms and abbreviations

- Sexual Assault Prevention and Response program member; responded to 12 calls--provided emotional support
- Took three classes; 4.0 grade point average--6 credit-hours from Community College of the Air Force degree
- Blitzed through on the job training; 127 tasks completed--ready for 5-level 6 months ahead of training timeline
- Instills pride in workcenter; sanitized five commodes and sinks--visiting General Officer departed cootie-free


When supervision complains about lack of teeth tell them "because acronyms"

Just looking over the layout, your fourth bullet is going to have 2 white spaces. Completely unacceptable. The rest is great, though...especially the "Instills pride..."

imported_UncommonSense
03-25-2014, 06:53 PM
Just looking over the layout, your fourth bullet is going to have 2 white spaces. Completely unacceptable. The rest is great, though...especially the "Instills pride..."

After further investigation, the restroom actually has six urinals and sinks.

- Instills pride in workcenter; sanitized six urinals and sinks--visiting General Officer cootie-free upon departure

sandsjames
03-25-2014, 08:13 PM
After further investigation, the restroom actually has six urinals and sinks.

- Instills pride in workcenter; sanitized six urinals and sinks--visiting General Officer cootie-free upon departure

Listen...I know that you are supposed to spell out numbers, as you did, when it doesn't related to time, etc...however, I prefer seeing the actual number. It sticks in my head better...sooooo...we're gonna go with that. That's going to add more white space. This guy sounds like, at best, a 4.

Chief_KO
03-25-2014, 08:27 PM
Wow...someone in 14 AF needs to buy a clue (sorry, I used the acronym AF), I meant to say someone on Twelfth Air Forces needs to buy a clue.
While the overuse of acronyms can be rampant, the ones you listed are all commonly used and should be okay IMO (in my opinion).

When I was on a team to write a USAFSE (United States Air Force Supervisory Examination) for WAPS (Weighted Airman Promotion System) testing one of the team's tasks was to write the acronym page. Not every acronym used on the test needs to be spelled out on the acronym page. So, if we felt that MAJCOM (Major Command) should already be known by those taking the promotion test, we did not list it. So there were only about 6 or so acronyms listed...

imported_AFKILO7
03-26-2014, 02:51 AM
Oh man I recently had a run in with the lame ass SSgt downstairs at the Group. She got all pissy and wanted to stick her dick beaters in my kool-aid regarding acronyms. I replied to her email to EAFD. She literally replied with: :) I'm now confused and feel that I have lost this fight...for now.

Measure Man
03-26-2014, 04:12 AM
Wow...someone in 14 AF needs to buy a clue (sorry, I used the acronym AF), I meant to say someone on Twelfth Air Forces needs to buy a clue..

Holy shit that made me laugh!!

BUDJR8
03-26-2014, 05:43 AM
Depending on the EPRs in my unit we've used different rules. Anything TSgt below or a MSgt EPR that won't leave the unit we've been a bit more relaxed on the acronyms. For MSgt above that will go to the group or wing, we try to abide by the wing writing guide as best we can.

Chief_KO
03-26-2014, 12:23 PM
Holy shit that made me laugh!!

Wow, I don't know what I was thinking as I typed that...not enough coffee???

Fourteenth Air Forces is obviously what I meant to say...

imported_UncommonSense
03-26-2014, 02:55 PM
What is the deal with approved acronyms anyways? There are multiple writing guides throughout the Air Force (AF) that have "commonly used acronyms" that are only common to that organization. Looking at the Fourteenth AF's list, I spotted several that I thought meant one thing, but were completely different. Do promotion boards have every approved list available to them, or do they just take a wild guess at what it stands for?

BRUWIN
03-26-2014, 04:44 PM
Acronym lists are job security for civilian secretaries and execs. That is why they exist. Acronyms are over-used anyways. Why use "U-2 Remote Sensor Control Work Station (RSCWS)" and then use the RSCWS throughout the rest of the epr so the reader then has to go back and try to find what RSCWS meant again? Just say "U-2 sensor controller" up front and then use sensor controller throughout the rest of epr.

On a side note...all you guys are knuckleheads. Just wanted to throw that out there.

BRUWIN
03-26-2014, 04:55 PM
What is the deal with approved acronyms anyways? There are multiple writing guides throughout the Air Force (AF) that have "commonly used acronyms" that are only common to that organization. Looking at the Fourteenth AF's list, I spotted several that I thought meant one thing, but were completely different. Do promotion boards have every approved list available to them, or do they just take a wild guess at what it stands for?

Wild guess many times. Every board I ever did, I would be put off by the overuse of acronyms....which to be honest was just about every 1206 or epr I read. If it read simple and didn't have all those BS acronyms and jargon then it made my job much easier. Some people think that spelling out the acronym at the beginning and then using the acronym a bazallion times throughout make's it all good. To be honest, many think that system gave me a definition of the acronym but it doesn't...and I still had absolutely no idea what the hell they were talking about.

sandsjames
03-26-2014, 05:42 PM
Wild guess many times. Every board I ever did, I would be put off by the overuse of acronyms....which to be honest was just about every 1206 or epr I read. If it read simple and didn't have all those BS acronyms and jargon then it made my job much easier. Some people think that spelling out the acronym at the beginning and then using the acronym a bazallion times throughout make's it all good. To be honest, many think that system gave me a definition of the acronym but it doesn't...and I still had absolutely no idea what the hell they were talking about.What I found interesting, and never really knew until a couple of years ago, is that the bottom block on the front side of the EPR (gets used for promotion statement) can actually be used to list the acronyms. Of course it's probably only used in the case of 1s and 2s, if ever, but it is proper usage of the block.

BENDER56
03-26-2014, 10:18 PM
Okay.

I know I've told all y'all this before, but apparently it didn't take. Nearly every "acronym" mentioned in this tread so far is not an acronym. They are plain old abbreviations.

Acronyms are a special subset of abbreviations that are pronounced like a word. Actually, they are a sub-subset -- acronyms are a subset of a subset of abbreviations know as initializations.

Examples of acronyms are:
MAJCOM
USAFE
WAPS
Scuba
Laser
Radar
Snafu
AWACS

People don't say they're going ess see you bee ay diving. They say they're going scuba diving. See? They pronounce s-c-u-b-a as if it was a word. (Scuba stands for self-contained underwater breathing apparatus, BTW.)

Examples of abbreviations that are not acronyms:
FBI
CIA
USAF
USMC
ATT
LOL
OMG
BTW

Those are initializations, but each individual letter is separately pronounced so they are not acronyms.

Another form of abbreviation is merely a shortened version of a word:
Dr.
Mr.
Rd.
St.
Ave.
Blvd.
Jan.
Feb.
Mass.
Conn.
Fla.

We read these by pronouncing the word as if it was entirely written, but these aren't acronyms because they aren't initializations.

You're welcome.

Again.

BRUWIN
03-26-2014, 10:56 PM
Okay.

I know I've told all y'all this before, but apparently it didn't take. Nearly every "acronym" mentioned in this tread so far is not an acronym. They are plain old abbreviations.

Acronyms are a special subset of abbreviations that are pronounced like a word. Actually, they are a sub-subset -- acronyms are a subset of a subset of abbreviations know as initializations.

Examples of acronyms are:
MAJCOM
USAFE
WAPS
Scuba
Laser
Radar
Snafu
AWACS

People don't say they're going ess see you bee ay diving. They say they're going scuba diving. See? They pronounce s-c-u-b-a as if it was a word. (Scuba stands for self-contained underwater breathing apparatus, BTW.)

Examples of abbreviations that are not acronyms:
FBI
CIA
USAF
USMC
ATT
LOL
OMG
BTW

Those are initializations, but each individual letter is separately pronounced so they are not acronyms.

Another form of abbreviation is merely a shortened version of a word:
Dr.
Mr.
Rd.
St.
Ave.
Blvd.
Jan.
Feb.
Mass.
Conn.
Fla.

We read these by pronouncing the word as if it was entirely written, but these aren't acronyms because they aren't initializations.

You're welcome.

Again.

The example I used was an acronym Mr Smarty Pants.

imported_KnuckleDragger
03-26-2014, 11:35 PM
Okay.

I know I've told all y'all this before, but apparently it didn't take. Nearly every "acronym" mentioned in this tread so far is not an acronym. They are plain old abbreviations.

Acronyms are a special subset of abbreviations that are pronounced like a word. Actually, they are a sub-subset -- acronyms are a subset of a subset of abbreviations know as initializations.

Examples of acronyms are:
MAJCOM
USAFE
WAPS
Scuba
Laser
Radar
Snafu
AWACS

People don't say they're going ess see you bee ay diving. They say they're going scuba diving. See? They pronounce s-c-u-b-a as if it was a word. (Scuba stands for self-contained underwater breathing apparatus, BTW.)

Examples of abbreviations that are not acronyms:
FBI
CIA
USAF
USMC
ATT
LOL
OMG
BTW

Those are initializations, but each individual letter is separately pronounced so they are not acronyms.

Another form of abbreviation is merely a shortened version of a word:
Dr.
Mr.
Rd.
St.
Ave.
Blvd.
Jan.
Feb.
Mass.
Conn.
Fla.

We read these by pronouncing the word as if it was entirely written, but these aren't acronyms because they aren't initializations.

You're welcome.

Again.

LOL. Because AF writing is all about proper writing and following the rules.

sandsjames
03-27-2014, 12:06 AM
Okay.

I know I've told all y'all this before, but apparently it didn't take. Nearly every "acronym" mentioned in this tread so far is not an acronym. They are plain old abbreviations.

Acronyms are a special subset of abbreviations that are pronounced like a word. Actually, they are a sub-subset -- acronyms are a subset of a subset of abbreviations know as initializations.

Examples of acronyms are:
MAJCOM
USAFE
WAPS
Scuba
Laser
Radar
Snafu
AWACS

People don't say they're going ess see you bee ay diving. They say they're going scuba diving. See? They pronounce s-c-u-b-a as if it was a word. (Scuba stands for self-contained underwater breathing apparatus, BTW.)

Examples of abbreviations that are not acronyms:
FBI
CIA
USAF
USMC
ATT
LOL
OMG
BTW

Those are initializations, but each individual letter is separately pronounced so they are not acronyms.

Another form of abbreviation is merely a shortened version of a word:
Dr.
Mr.
Rd.
St.
Ave.
Blvd.
Jan.
Feb.
Mass.
Conn.
Fla.

We read these by pronouncing the word as if it was entirely written, but these aren't acronyms because they aren't initializations.

You're welcome.

Again.

Thanks, Bob...

imported_KnuckleDragger
03-27-2014, 12:34 AM
Thanks, Bob...

I thought about posting the exact same thing. LOL

Capt Alfredo
03-27-2014, 12:39 AM
Wild guess many times. Every board I ever did, I would be put off by the overuse of acronyms....which to be honest was just about every 1206 or epr I read. If it read simple and didn't have all those BS acronyms and jargon then it made my job much easier. Some people think that spelling out the acronym at the beginning and then using the acronym a bazallion times throughout make's it all good. To be honest, many think that system gave me a definition of the acronym but it doesn't...and I still had absolutely no idea what the hell they were talking about.

I bet that won you a lot of fans in the intel world. Our evals look like a cryptography bazaar. My boss is not intel and he's routinely demanding we dumb it down so even a pilot can understand.

BRUWIN
03-27-2014, 12:51 AM
I bet that won you a lot of fans in the intel world. Our evals look like a cryptography bazaar. My boss is not intel and he's routinely demanding we dumb it down so even a pilot can understand.

Yeah...those first few years were brutal when i crosstrained. My first day out of tech school I arrived to Beale and there were like 10 eprs already waiting on me...I started thumbing through them and was laughing my ass off...I had not one clue what any of them were trying to say. Even the duty descrition's were like Arabic. And then they complained to me nobody ever won any awards outside the unit. So I started making them simple. My section had the base Airman of the Year my first year there. We were a tenant unit and a SMSgt I worked for said it couldn't be done just because of that. He took that 1206 I wrote and bled all over it. I sat on it and submitted at last minute saying "Sorry...just didn't have chance to fix it." It won hands down. He wanted to screw with me because he didn't like the fact a MSgt cross trainee was assigned to him.

Gonzo432
03-27-2014, 02:34 AM
I bet that won you a lot of fans in the intel world. Our evals look like a cryptography bazaar. My boss is not intel and he's routinely demanding we dumb it down so even a pilot can understand.

+1 for "cryptography bazaar".

Duh, stick goes back, houses get smaller. Stick goes forward, houses get bigger. At least your boss realizes stuff needs to be dumbed down for him. That's the first step to admitting, "I'm not the smartest guy in the room."

ske4za
03-27-2014, 03:21 AM
What I found interesting, and never really knew until a couple of years ago, is that the bottom block on the front side of the EPR (gets used for promotion statement) can actually be used to list the acronyms. Of course it's probably only used in the case of 1s and 2s, if ever, but it is proper usage of the block.

I had no idea either. Just looked up in the AFI, thanks for that. The new EPR blocks have an "Other Comments" field where you can define acronyms, or write short blurbs, like comments. But of course people use it as two extra lines for full bullets. The example they give in the AFI is "- Ready for Instructor Duty". Short and sweet. Also applicable:


1.3.7.2. Acronyms.
1.3.7.2.1. Uncommon acronyms must be spelled out; however, if space is limited,
define the acronyms in the remarks section of the applicable form. Note: The newer
versions of the AF Forms 707, 910, and 911 have been revised to allow the
evaluator’s to explain acronyms in the Remarks (AF Form 707) and in Other
Comments (AF Form 910/911) section of the form; when used they must be listed in
the order used.
1.3.7.2.2. When used, first spell out and follow with the acronym; i.e. Personnel
Support for Contingency Operations (PERSCO).
1.3.7.2.3. Acronyms or abbreviations common throughout the Air Force, such as
CGO, NCO, CONUS, TDY, etc., are not required to be spelled out first.

(emphasis mine)

One could argue that CFC, US, SAPR, etc, fall under 1.3.7.2.3 as abbreviations/acronyms common throughout the Air Force and as such, do not need to be part of an approved list provided to you to be usable on the EPR.

natethegreat
03-27-2014, 04:46 PM
That bottom block was not used for acronyms because "way add acronyms if you can say more about the person". It's the same thing with white space. If you have space at the end of a bullet you are not saying enough about the person.

My CC's exec told me "you can not use acronyms unless they are in the 14th AF acronym list". I told him that most of these were approved by the DoD & the AF supplement. He told me that doesn't matter, only approved 14th AF acronyms.

TJMAC77SP
03-27-2014, 04:51 PM
Thanks, Bob...

FIRST thing I thought.

BENDER56
03-27-2014, 05:53 PM
The example I used was an acronym Mr Smarty Pants.

And I applaud you for that, sir Chief, Ret.

It's also why I wrote, "Nearly every "acronym" mentioned ..."

LogDog
03-27-2014, 06:44 PM
For me, the use of acronyms should be kept to a minimum and only used when the acronym is universally or expected to be known throughout the Air Force. For example, MAJCOM is an acronym everyone should know. The problem with acronyms is when they relate to a specific career field such as a piece of equipment those outside that career field don't know what it means. EPRs are reviewed at various boards, including SMSgt and CMSgt boards, and if the reviewers can't relate to or decipher the acronyms then those bullets lose their value and overall bring down board scores.

fog
03-27-2014, 07:44 PM
This brought back some good memories. Here are some we used.

Bohica (bend over here it comes again)
Fubar
Snafu
Jafo (just another f'n observer)
Figmo
Tango Uniform (t@ts up)
CBPO (commissary bx and post office)(meant when goofing off)
NSP (non sortie producer)
Noner (non sortie producer)

Any others out there? I know there are more, but these were off the top of my head.

imported_UncommonSense
03-27-2014, 07:49 PM
For me, the use of acronyms should be kept to a minimum and only used when the acronym is universally or expected to be known throughout the Air Force. For example, MAJCOM is an acronym everyone should know. The problem with acronyms is when they relate to a specific career field such as a piece of equipment those outside that career field don't know what it means. EPRs are reviewed at various boards, including SMSgt and CMSgt boards, and if the reviewers can't relate to or decipher the acronyms then those bullets lose their value and overall bring down board scores.

So what you're saying is we should eliminate acronyms and abbreviations and go back to sub-bullets so that way we can actually explain how awesome of an action this was rather than "- Phenomenal ldr; ovrsw 250 STONS dplyd eqpt--ROK TSP not FUBAR."

And, if it can all be said without having to find synonyms for words just so there isn't any white space...so be it.

Just like it was in the 1990's?

I like it

PS;

According to the tongue and quill, these are the two examples for performance report bullets.

"- Restored 40 damaged elements on six AN/GRA-4 Log Periodic Antennas in three days using decommissioned antenna parts
-- Saved $3479 and 4 weeks of expected delivery time
-- Sharply improved voice clarity for Atlantic Gateway Antenna System operators in US and Europe

- Processed over 300 records with no errors as part of the 42 ABW Mobility Exercise
-- Ensured all wing personnel met their scheduled clock times
-- Helped the wing garner an overall “OUTSTANDING” rating from the IG team"

Chief_KO
03-27-2014, 07:56 PM
So what you're saying is we should eliminate acronyms and abbreviations and go back to sub-bullets so that way we can actually explain how awesome of an action this was rather than "- Phenomenal ldr; ovrsw 250 STONS dplyd eqpt--ROK TSP not FUBAR."

Or eliminate the useless lead in statements...
- Oversaw 250 tons deployed equip--ensured Korean spares mission ready

SomeRandomGuy
03-27-2014, 07:59 PM
Or eliminate the useless lead in statements...
- Oversaw 250 tons deployed equip--ensured Korean spares mission ready

But, then how would we know he was a phenominal leader? I mean couldn't anyone average joe "oversee 250 tons of deployed equipment"? Maybe all he did was look out the aircraft window as he flew over it.

LogDog
03-27-2014, 08:10 PM
So what you're saying is we should eliminate acronyms and abbreviations and go back to sub-bullets so that way we can actually explain how awesome of an action this was rather than "- Phenomenal ldr; ovrsw 250 STONS dplyd eqpt--ROK TSP not FUBAR."

And, if it can all be said without having to find synonyms for words just so there isn't any white space...so be it.

Just like it was in the 1990's?

I like it

PS;

According to the tongue and quill, these are the two examples for performance report bullets.

"- Restored 40 damaged elements on six AN/GRA-4 Log Periodic Antennas in three days using decommissioned antenna parts
-- Saved $3479 and 4 weeks of expected delivery time
-- Sharply improved voice clarity for Atlantic Gateway Antenna System operators in US and Europe

- Processed over 300 records with no errors as part of the 42 ABW Mobility Exercise
-- Ensured all wing personnel met their scheduled clock times
-- Helped the wing garner an overall “OUTSTANDING” rating from the IG team"
I'm not saying we need to eliminate all acronyms or abbreviations but keep those that are universally or expected to be known like MAJCOM or USAF.

We don't need to go back to sub-bullets but you should be able to state what the person did and the impact their actions had. I know, having written, re-written, and reviewed, dozens of EPRs, it can be hard to condense an accomplishment in one sentence that someone outside the career field can understand but that's what you have to do. The process challenges the writer to keep it simple but understandable.

Chief_KO
03-27-2014, 08:56 PM
But, then how would we know he was a phenominal leader? I mean couldn't anyone average joe "oversee 250 tons of deployed equipment"? Maybe all he did was look out the aircraft window as he flew over it.

Winner winner, chicken dinner...You've spotted the flaw in the original bullet. What did he do other than "oversee"...heck, anyone from E-1 to O-10 can oversee...even a GS can oversee as long as it's in his/her position description (PD).

I would have kicked the original bullet back, for two reasons: 1) the useless/fluff/waste of space lead-in, 2) the lack of any action. Now if TSgt Johnny actually created a new program, leveraged technology, conducted recurring audits...whatever...that was never stated. So, my takeaway is that he sat in his office and looked out on the warehouse floor on ocassion.

sandsjames
03-27-2014, 09:33 PM
Or eliminate the useless lead in statements...
- Oversaw 250 tons deployed equip--ensured Korean spares mission readyBang on right here Chief. It should need to say nothing more than that...

However, the whole 250 tons is irrelevant anyway. If a guy doing the same job at another base only has 200 tons based on the requirements of the base, does that make the guy with 250 tons better???

:edit Just noticed this fact was already agreed upon. I do wish, though, that the bullet could be as simple as the one your wrote. Two parts (as taught in PME) and to the point.

Chief_KO
03-27-2014, 09:44 PM
Two part bullets are okay...so long as it's clear
-action; resulting impact
But sometimes it is clearer to the reader in three parts
- action; result--impact

Most acronyms and other "homemade words" can be eliminated just like I illustrated before. If Johnny is an outstanding/exceptional leader, I would expect that rating to be to the far right; with the bullets strong enough to support such ratings.
Problem was (is), too many supervisors thought there should never be white space, and every bullet needs to sound like Johnny saved the world, even if he only sat and looked out the window.
I seriously hope the rumors to EPR closeout dates matching the PECD is true...that one simple step will go far to decrease inflation and over-writing.

LogDog
03-28-2014, 12:21 AM
Two part bullets are okay...so long as it's clear
-action; resulting impact
But sometimes it is clearer to the reader in three parts
- action; result--impact

Most acronyms and other "homemade words" can be eliminated just like I illustrated before. If Johnny is an outstanding/exceptional leader, I would expect that rating to be to the far right; with the bullets strong enough to support such ratings.
Problem was (is), too many supervisors thought there should never be white space, and every bullet needs to sound like Johnny saved the world, even if he only sat and looked out the window.
I seriously hope the rumors to EPR closeout dates matching the PECD is true...that one simple step will go far to decrease inflation and over-writing.
I agree wholeheartedly. If the front of the EPR says Johnny is exceptional then why repeat saying it in bullets. The bullet statements should support the front of the EPR by say what he did, how well he did it, and the impact he had.

As for white space, as far as I'm concerned it's not a big thing as long as there's not too much white space. For example, if the bullet is 75% words and 25% white space, as long as the bullet is effective in conveying Johnny's accomplishments it works/worked for me. Now if it was 50-50, then I be worried.

I had one EPR written by a 1st Lt., former SSgt, who literally hated me and gave me a "3" EPR as a MSgt. The Medical Group commander and the Administrator chewed his ass out for the EPR because they knew me, knew the EPR was BS, and told him they'd wouldn't accept anything other than a "5" EPR. He re-did it and the bullet statements occupied about 50-60% of the line with the rest as white space. I still made SMSgt a couple of years later, I was still a young MSgt at the time, even though it was the third from the latest of my EPRs.

sandsjames
03-28-2014, 01:43 AM
I agree wholeheartedly. If the front of the EPR says Johnny is exceptional then why repeat saying it in bullets. The bullet statements should support the front of the EPR by say what he did, how well he did it, and the impact he had.

As for white space, as far as I'm concerned it's not a big thing as long as there's not too much white space. For example, if the bullet is 75% words and 25% white space, as long as the bullet is effective in conveying Johnny's accomplishments it works/worked for me. Now if it was 50-50, then I be worried.

I had one EPR written by a 1st Lt., former SSgt, who literally hated me and gave me a "3" EPR as a MSgt. The Medical Group commander and the Administrator chewed his ass out for the EPR because they knew me, knew the EPR was BS, and told him they'd wouldn't accept anything other than a "5" EPR. He re-did it and the bullet statements occupied about 50-60% of the line with the rest as white space. I still made SMSgt a couple of years later, I was still a young MSgt at the time, even though it was the third from the latest of my EPRs.

No need to say how well he did it. The impact should infer that.

Capt Alfredo
03-28-2014, 01:52 AM
No need to say how well he did it. The impact should infer that.

No, you infer something from what is implied.

/RFD

BOSS302
03-28-2014, 02:02 PM
No need to say how well he did it. The impact should infer that.


No, you infer something from what is implied.

/RFD

https://img0.etsystatic.com/031/0/8486792/il_570xN.513147124_m9du.jpg

sandsjames
03-28-2014, 03:09 PM
https://img0.etsystatic.com/031/0/8486792/il_570xN.513147124_m9du.jpg

Exactly...

Kalbo607
03-29-2014, 04:50 PM
EPR and award bullets should just state the facts plain and simple. Intel is terrible for for exaggerating bullets. Seems every intel brief given has resulted in X amount of targets or HVTs killed. From the numbers I have seen over the years every terrorist on the face of the earth has been killed, and there should not be any Taliban left in Afghanistan.

Also EPR from can change quotas can be implemented, but if bullets a full of exaggerations system will still not work.

I keep the bullets I write plain and simple, let the cards fall where they may. I would love to have award nominees show up to a board in person and be questioned on what is on there 1206.

BRUWIN
03-29-2014, 05:49 PM
EPR and award bullets should just state the facts plain and simple. Intel is terrible for for exaggerating bullets. Seems every intel brief given has resulted in X amount of targets or HVTs killed. From the numbers I have seen over the years every terrorist on the face of the earth has been killed, and there should not be any Taliban left in Afghanistan.

Also EPR from can change quotas can be implemented, but if bullets a full of exaggerations system will still not work.

I keep the bullets I write plain and simple, let the cards fall where they may. I would love to have award nominees show up to a board in person and be questioned on what is on there 1206.

As a board member one can easily spot exagerration and it's everybody doing it...not just intel. I will never forget the two-striper cop BTZ package I receieved as a base BTZ board member. Reading his EPR...this guy single-handidly won the war in Iraq and he never even left home station. It was quite halarious to read it. I was sitting there with the rest of the board and I couldn't help but keep chuckling. The other board members...who I honestly didn't know very well...kept looking over at me while I was reading this thing because I couldn't hold in the chuckles. We really weren't supposed to be influencing each other but you could tell they wanted to know who's EPR I was looking at. I really can't remember if the guy got the stripe or not....but I know that if he did I certainly had nothing to do with it. It was surprising to me that a cop EPR looked like that...they usually eat their young.

BOSS302
03-29-2014, 07:57 PM
My favorite of all time was the 1206 of a SrA who did more training hours in a quarter than there are actual hours in a quarter. It was absurd.

Class5Kayaker
04-01-2014, 09:38 PM
This brought back some good memories. Here are some we used.

Bohica (bend over here it comes again)
Fubar
Snafu
Jafo (just another f'n observer)
Figmo
Tango Uniform (t@ts up)
CBPO (commissary bx and post office)(meant when goofing off)NSP (non sortie producer)
Noner (non sortie producer)

Any others out there? I know there are more, but these were off the top of my head.

Do you realize that CBPO officially stood for Consolidated Base Personnel Offices until the mid 90's (today's MPS, or MPE, or MPF, or whatever the hell they're calling themselves this minute)? So it's alternate use was funny because your sign-out board indicated you were off somewhere doing official business while you were really just OFO (out f**king off).

fufu
04-02-2014, 12:05 AM
My favorite of all time was the 1206 of a SrA who did more training hours in a quarter than there are actual hours in a quarter. It was absurd.

As a supervisor of a new SSgt, I asked to see his previous EPR. He completed "68 credit hours towards his CCAF/95%" - Really? How many people did that EPR go through?

Chief_KO
04-02-2014, 03:37 AM
As a supervisor of a new SSgt, I asked to see his previous EPR. He completed "68 credit hours towards his CCAF/95%" - Really? How many people did that EPR go through?

Which is why in previous threads I stated the importance of the Chief (me), reviewing all EPRs in my unit...not all share the same view. But, unless I was a signatory (which was only 3-4 out of 150), I never saw the finished product. So, even after my edits/comments, a bad bullet could still find its way back in.

One of my favorites: - Excelled in TSgt roll (meaning this young SSgt stepped up to fill the Asst NCOIC TSgt duty). My edit "- Excelled in jelly roll"
After the shop chief called to inquire, I explained the "- Excelled in TSgt roll" was as strong as a jelly roll...no action. He then told me the things this SSgt did...none of which were in this bullet.

Don't be cute. Tell the reader what he/she did. Use words understood by the reader. Don't use your thesaurus to find "squire" or "traverse" as a synonym for lead.

fufu
04-02-2014, 03:47 AM
Which is why in previous threads I stated the importance of the Chief (me), reviewing all EPRs in my unit...not all share the same view. But, unless I was a signatory (which was only 3-4 out of 150), I never saw the finished product. So, even after my edits/comments, a bad bullet could still find its way back in.

One of my favorites: - Excelled in TSgt roll (meaning this young SSgt stepped up to fill the Asst NCOIC TSgt duty). My edit "- Excelled in jelly roll"
After the shop chief called to inquire, I explained the "- Excelled in TSgt roll" was as strong as a jelly roll...no action. He then told me the things this SSgt did...none of which were in this bullet.

Don't be cute. Tell the reader what he/she did. Use words understood by the reader. Don't use your thesaurus to find "squire" or "traverse" as a synonym for lead.

If I "QB'd" on one more EPR/1206....I'm throat chopping people.

BOSS302
04-02-2014, 08:08 AM
If I "QB'd" on one more EPR/1206....I'm throat chopping people.

I have done so much "spearheading" in my Air Force career (according to my 1206s and EPRs) that I should now have my tribal headhunter certifications by now.

Chief_KO
04-02-2014, 12:49 PM
If I "QB'd" on one more EPR/1206....I'm throat chopping people.

Back when each year a Colonel or Chief would put out his "notes" from sitting on a promotion board they would typically give examples of "good" & "weak" bullets.
That really caused a pendulum effect....one panel member loved sports so he/she raved that "-Quarterbacked" or "--slam dunk" was strong and really made the point clear. So, what did we do...the next year used every sports cliche you could fit into an EPR...only for the next year's notes to highlight those bullets as weak and fluffy.

PburghNo1
04-02-2014, 02:18 PM
Do you realize that CBPO officially stood for Consolidated Base Personnel Offices until the mid 90's (today's MPS, or MPE, or MPF, or whatever the hell they're calling themselves this minute)? So it's alternate use was funny because your sign-out board indicated you were off somewhere doing official business while you were really just OFO (out f**king off).

I've seen the reverse CBPO thing...using a full, official-sounding (albeit made-up) place to sign out to. "Hey boss, headed to the 'Ground Ordinance Launch Facility', be back in a bit." Sounded official until you looked at the "acronym"...GOLF.

Measure Man
04-02-2014, 03:43 PM
Which is why in previous threads I stated the importance of the Chief (me), reviewing all EPRs in my unit...not all share the same view. But, unless I was a signatory (which was only 3-4 out of 150), I never saw the finished product. So, even after my edits/comments, a bad bullet could still find its way back in.

I would be one that does NOT share your view.

I see no reason for the Chief to review every single EPR in the squadron. Tremendous waste of time, IMO. Will some bad bullets get through? I'm sure...so will some bad bullets get through some Chiefs. There is a rater and a mandatory rater's rater (MSgt) , plus the CC. If you have an average SrA doing average work...I don't see any need to make sure every bullet is as a strong as it can be.

IMO a squadron Chief should review all or most SNCO EPRs, maybe the top 30-50% of TSgts, and maybe the top 10% of everyone else...less is acceptable.

A Chief's time is better spent elsewhere...I hate that so many Chief's seem to spend so much of their day editing word choice.