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View Full Version : CO of USS TAYLOR relieved



Stalwart
02-26-2014, 12:24 AM
Navy Times: http://www.navytimes.com/article/20140225/CAREERS03/302250017/Frigate-Taylor-CO-fired-2-weeks-after-running-aground

Relieved for loss of confidence in his ability to command after running aground in Turkey.

AJBIGJ
02-26-2014, 12:32 AM
Kind of sad, I am curious what mistakes were made along the way, if any. Part of the job certainly.

Greg
02-26-2014, 02:06 AM
I read that there was confusion between electronic navigation and paper charts; that sandbar was not suppose to be there!

BURAWSKI
02-26-2014, 02:35 AM
I read that there was confusion between electronic navigation and paper charts; that sandbar was not suppose to be there!

In my opinion I think the problem is not with paper charts, but with too much reliance on electronic navigation. I think a lot of the ship handling training is being done using computer consoles instead of actual, hands on training.

Salty Old Dog
02-26-2014, 03:13 PM
No mention as to whether a harbor pilot was on board. Even with one, the CO likely would have borne the brunt of the blame, but might have escaped with a lesser punishment. He's a 96 grad of Canoe U, so will probably "sail a desk" for 2 more years, then retire at 20 as an O-5.

The one that always surprised me was the CO of the USS Enterprise (the "Big E"), who was blamed in part for the grounding of the ship in 1983, 600 yards from the home port pier at Alameda. He was relieved, but was due to have that happen anyways, and was allowed to keep his promotion to Rear Admiral (lower half), as he'd already been chosen to recieve his star.

About 11 years later, when I was working for the Navy in Guam, I happened to be looking through the Navy's local weekly newspaper, and saw a photo of this same officer....who was, at that time, CINCPACFLT!! Yep, he was a 4-star admiral in charge of the Pacific Fleet! That man must have had one helluva "rabbi" running his career, is all I have to say about that! In fact, according to Wikipedia, it took his being the senior officer present during the Tailhook scandal in 1991, to force him into retirement!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_J._Kelly

Stalwart
02-27-2014, 01:25 PM
In my opinion I think the problem is not with paper charts, but with too much reliance on electronic navigation. I think a lot of the ship handling training is being done using computer consoles instead of actual, hands on training.

Well, there is a difference between electronic navigation and ship handling training. Nothing replaces conning the ship at sea or actually pulling it alongside for refueling or mooring. All of my ship handling training was done at sea, in control of a DDG. That said, there are simulators at all major Naval Bases to maintain proficiency during long in port or DSRA periods (but the good XO's and TRAINO's get the JO's TAD to something underway.) The school for SWO qualification, "Advanced Ship handling and Tactics" is three weeks long and held in Newport, RI ... it is all classroom and ship handling is done on simulators -- but you have to already be a qualified Officer of the Deck to attend. ASAT is really a capstone of everything you have already done in the SWO PQS.

There are only three instances where the Commanding Officer is truly not 'responsible' for the handling of the vessel:

1. Transiting the Panama Canal at the control of the Panama Canal Authority
2. Once any portion of the ship has crossed into the dry dock until the ship has completely exited the dry dock
3. When completing a 'dead stick' movement

A CO is ultimately responsible for the ship, and the CO that qualified me as an OOD made it clear that when he was asleep in his bed at 0200 and I had the Deck, he was putting his career in my hands. There are a lot of tools at the hands of the CO (and the NAV and OOD) to prevent running aground and being ultimately responsible, unless in one of those three cases, there is likely to be a relief.