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Mcjohn1118
02-02-2014, 02:24 PM
On many threads, folks talk about the joys of retirement. Some of us are retiring this year. I will have my last day of active duty on May 16th and it will be glorious. When I read everyone's posts, I want to chime in and ask questions. But that is thread jacking so I created a new thread and want to ask retirees a few questions. Anyway, as some of you mentioned before, about half my life was spent in uniform so even though I know it's the right time to leave the AF, it's a little overwhelming to think I have to start all over again.

1. What was the hardest part of your transition? Seriously. For me I'm going to miss the interaction with the people I work with. Oh and buying a new wardrobe. That's a big pain in the ass too.
2. Is there the same sense of camaraderie in civilian businesses?
3. How difficult was it for some of you to land a job? I know some of you actually retired from all work, that is not an option for me. I couldn't stay home for more than a week or two before my wife would kick me out.
4. If some of you stayed in the same unit as a civil service employee post retirement, was it hard?
There are questions I have everyday and there are others in my unit retiring this year as well that I talk too. But I am curious to see if other retirees have the same issues.

sandsjames
02-02-2014, 02:51 PM
1. What was the hardest part of your transition? Seriously. For me I'm going to miss the interaction with the people I work with. Oh and buying a new wardrobe. That's a big pain in the ass too. Personally, there was difficult part of the transition, other than the waiting. The rest of it was 100% joy. I guess it depends on the person, though.


2. Is there the same sense of camaraderie in civilian businesses? It's going to depend on the type of job you get. I know that's not very helpful, but there may be more, there may be less. I guess one thing about the military lifestyle is it makes it pretty easy for everyone to relate to each other, where in the civilian sector you might not find the same thing.


3. How difficult was it for some of you to land a job? I know some of you actually retired from all work, that is not an option for me. I couldn't stay home for more than a week or two before my wife would kick me out. The jobs are out there. It depends, again, on what you are looking for. Are you going to be willing to move to where the job is? Will you take something for a little less money than you think you deserve? Again, not very helpful, but I don't think there's an easy answer. The jobs are out there, you just gotta be willing to compromise.


4. If some of you stayed in the same unit as a civil service employee post retirement, was it hard? Can't answer this one cuz I haven't dealt with it.


are questions I have everyday and there are others in my unit retiring this year as well that I talk too. But I am curious to see if other retirees have the same issues.

I've had zero issues, honestly. I don't miss any part of it, other than the socializing. Just remember that thousands of people do the same thing you are getting ready to do and most of those people do just fine. You will need to be flexible. Go with the flow.

imnohero
02-02-2014, 02:53 PM
Speaking for myself:

1) I didn't find the transition difficult at all. When I retired I was all done with military life. Yes, some of the habits carried on, like wearing a hat outdoors, but those are minor things. I found far greater pleasure in all the things I no longer "had to do" than any pain in the butt.

2) Camaraderie in the workplace becomes much more about individual personalities than common purpose. Being able/willing to cultivate interpersonal relationships is much more important in the civilian world.

3) Finding a job is proving more difficult than I anticipated, but I wouldn't go by only my experience. My college classmates don't seem to be having problems, many of them have jobs lined up for after graduation. So there are jobs out there.

4) I went from my last military position, to being a civilian in the same position, for about a year. In retrospect, it eliminated a lot of stress of transition because I already knew the job and all the people, so I could focus on how to function as a "civilian" vs. "military". It was a contract position that lasted only a year...I don't think I would have wanted to continue that indefinately.

MisterBen
02-02-2014, 02:57 PM
On many threads, folks talk about the joys of retirement. Some of us are retiring this year. I will have my last day of active duty on May 16th and it will be glorious. When I read everyone's posts, I want to chime in and ask questions. But that is thread jacking so I created a new thread and want to ask retirees a few questions. Anyway, as some of you mentioned before, about half my life was spent in uniform so even though I know it's the right time to leave the AF, it's a little overwhelming to think I have to start all over again.

1. What was the hardest part of your transition? Seriously. For me I'm going to miss the interaction with the people I work with. Oh and buying a new wardrobe. That's a big pain in the ass too.
2. Is there the same sense of camaraderie in civilian businesses?
3. How difficult was it for some of you to land a job? I know some of you actually retired from all work, that is not an option for me. I couldn't stay home for more than a week or two before my wife would kick me out.
4. If some of you stayed in the same unit as a civil service employee post retirement, was it hard?
There are questions I have everyday and there are others in my unit retiring this year as well that I talk too. But I am curious to see if other retirees have the same issues.

Congratulations and I feel some envy because I cannot wait to retire. My first AD stint was in the Marine Corps and I got out and worked in the civilian sector for 13 years before returning to active duty. I have 24 years of service (which on the pay scale is an excellent base pay) but I will have to do five more years to achieve an active duty retirement. I am 48. Sometimes, I wish I would have remained and completed my service without a break. If that was the case, I would have made my twenty in 2003.

But I know many retirees and worked in various professions in the civilian world; one which was in law enforcement and that is where I learned, I can receive the same type of camaraderie as the military. But I worked for many firms that promoted quality of life and family. For me, it was less stress working in a civilian office environment than in a military organization but I do understand why those differences exists. I did have to stop the profanity in my civilian job but again, it depends on the civilian job.

Also, you are probably going through a transition office which is giving you advice and classes on how to transition and adapt to the civilian sector. It is always good to have a decent suit in your wardrobe or even good casual wear for those jobs that will require it.

I was a non-rate when I first exited the service and obviously, depending if you are looking for a job in the private or public sector, will depend on your AFSC experience and position. I never had a problem finding a job in the civilian world but I will be in my 50s when I leave the service for good and know that age will become a factor. Also, location is a big factor. I returned to New York City and there were an abundance of jobs back then.

Many of the retirees that I talk to at the VFW have awesome second careers and a lot more free time they had when they served.

God speed.

BRUWIN
02-02-2014, 03:02 PM
On many threads, folks talk about the joys of retirement. Some of us are retiring this year. I will have my last day of active duty on May 16th and it will be glorious. When I read everyone's posts, I want to chime in and ask questions. But that is thread jacking so I created a new thread and want to ask retirees a few questions. Anyway, as some of you mentioned before, about half my life was spent in uniform so even though I know it's the right time to leave the AF, it's a little overwhelming to think I have to start all over again.

1. What was the hardest part of your transition? Seriously. For me I'm going to miss the interaction with the people I work with. Oh and buying a new wardrobe. That's a big pain in the ass too.
2. Is there the same sense of camaraderie in civilian businesses?
3. How difficult was it for some of you to land a job? I know some of you actually retired from all work, that is not an option for me. I couldn't stay home for more than a week or two before my wife would kick me out.
4. If some of you stayed in the same unit as a civil service employee post retirement, was it hard?
There are questions I have everyday and there are others in my unit retiring this year as well that I talk too. But I am curious to see if other retirees have the same issues.

The only hard part I had was trying to get away from the military. In that regard my biggest mistake was staying in 30 years. Don't stay in 30 years...companies don't want 50 year olds. I bet if you check the ranks of the long term unemployed you will find that most folks laid off in the great recession that have yet to find another job are about my age. It is discouraging. I didn't want a lot of money...I just wanted to try something totally new. I really wanted to work for the railroad and I tried for a year but have given up. Got one interview with CSX in a job that 2,000 people applied for...but I believe they were looking for someone younger because the school itself was 9 months long. I think I also would have done a lot better if I had been willing to apply for jobs that required moving but I promised my boys I wouldn't put them through that again.

So some GS's quit at my old unit and they did some emergency hires and I eventually went back there. I am grateful for the job but it wasn't what I had in mind. It wasn't hard to go back...just disappointing in a way. So I'll do this for awhile longer until my boys are both in college. Then I want to start my own business and not have to worry about chasing the next job.

MisterBen
02-02-2014, 03:11 PM
...companies don't want 50 year olds.

Thank you for confirming that for me. :) My military MOS is IT and Cyber Command is moving to my post so I think I will be ok when I punch out. Usually IT is age proof.

BRUWIN
02-02-2014, 03:25 PM
Thank you for confirming that for me. :) My military MOS is IT and Cyber Command is moving to my post so I think I will be ok when I punch out. Usually IT is age proof.

I'd agree. I was applying for blue collar type stuff where old people aren't necessarily revered.

Drackore
02-02-2014, 05:17 PM
Yea that's going to worry me, because I'll be 45 at my 20 yr mark, and if I want to (and if the AF lets me) do 3 more years to make up for the REDUX, I'll be 48 when I retire. That's going to be a concern. Guess I better keep chipping away at that Master's Degree just to be safe.

Chief_KO
02-02-2014, 07:13 PM
Serving 30 years and not having a bachelors degree limited the jobs I could apply for here. Most positions I would have wanted all required a BS. My physical limitations (lifting/standing) were a concern for a couple of other jobs too. I spent 2 of my three months of terminal leave searching for work. My AFSC was comm, but I had not "done the JOB" in a long time and had no certifications (or really the desire) to do that work again. My first job was at a college working in financial aid. It was okay, but the amount of "requests for information/reports/BS" that management requested was worse than the AF. After six months I got (on my birthday) an offer for a simple, entry-level GS position. I go to work everyday, do my job and go home. Absolutely ZERO work stress.

No, far from it. Loyalty to the company and loyalty from the company is zero.

While job searching I was busy doing the homebody job, cooking, taking the dog for a walk, yard work, etc. I knew I had retirement coming so we had enough $ to live, just not extra $ to live well. Also knew I would receive VA disability, just didn't know how much or how soon it would start.

Even though I came back to the base after nearly a year it was very different. People you knew move on and you've been replaced (and the mission goes on without you) Personally I don't like the idea of coming back to the same unit (especially the same job) as Mr., but to each his own.
We chose to come here to retire, good schools (our son is in HS), good QoL, good medical, small town atmosphere (which we like). No regrets there, although when I "retire retire" in 9 years not sure where we will go to next (or stay here).

I'm active in our local church, VFW, and AFSA where I like to continue to take care of people. I served 30 years, probably 24 of those were great times (3 $hitty assignments), and the AF was pretty darn good to me and my family.
Best wishes to you for a successful and happy retirement!

Gonzo432
02-02-2014, 07:58 PM
Great questions McJohn.
1. What was the hardest part of your transition? Seriously. For me I'm going to miss the interaction with the people I work with. Oh and buying a new wardrobe. That's a big pain in the ass too.
Literally having to pick what to wear to work.

2. Is there the same sense of camaraderie in civilian businesses?
There are similarities, but nothing like what you see in a unit overseas. Work Centers can be close and hate on other areas.

3. How difficult was it for some of you to land a job? I know some of you actually retired from all work, that is not an option for me. I couldn't stay home for more than a week or two before my wife would kick me out.

After 3 days I knew I had to find a job. The cars were waxed and the yard looked great. I spent over 3 months searching, hired on 4 days after retirement date.

4. If some of you stayed in the same unit as a civil service employee post retirement, was it hard?
There are questions I have everyday and there are others in my unit retiring this year as well that I talk too. But I am curious to see if other retirees have the same issues.
In hindsight, I'm glad I went a different direction (VA). I had the chance to go to a unit at Scott that did the same thing mine at Langley did. I don't know what would have been better, I'm happy with this.

MisterBen
02-02-2014, 08:02 PM
Yea that's going to worry me, because I'll be 45 at my 20 yr mark, and if I want to (and if the AF lets me) do 3 more years to make up for the REDUX, I'll be 48 when I retire. That's going to be a concern. Guess I better keep chipping away at that Master's Degree just to be safe.

Excellent decision. I just finished my master's degree in IT and just need to renew my certs by time they expire. They will expire in 2018, so I will take them around that time. I will not renew my CCNA cert but all the ones for SANS.


Serving 30 years and not having a bachelors degree limited the jobs I could apply for here. Most positions I would have wanted all required a BS. My physical limitations (lifting/standing) were a concern for a couple of other jobs too. I spent 2 of my three months of terminal leave searching for work. My AFSC was comm, but I had not "done the JOB" in a long time and had no certifications (or really the desire) to do that work again. My first job was at a college working in financial aid. It was okay, but the amount of "requests for information/reports/BS" that management requested was worse than the AF. After six months I got (on my birthday) an offer for a simple, entry-level GS position. I go to work everyday, do my job and go home. Absolutely ZERO work stress.

No, far from it. Loyalty to the company and loyalty from the company is zero.

While job searching I was busy doing the homebody job, cooking, taking the dog for a walk, yard work, etc. I knew I had retirement coming so we had enough $ to live, just not extra $ to live well. Also knew I would receive VA disability, just didn't know how much or how soon it would start.

Even though I came back to the base after nearly a year it was very different. People you knew move on and you've been replaced (and the mission goes on without you) Personally I don't like the idea of coming back to the same unit (especially the same job) as Mr., but to each his own.
We chose to come here to retire, good schools (our son is in HS), good QoL, good medical, small town atmosphere (which we like). No regrets there, although when I "retire retire" in 9 years not sure where we will go to next (or stay here).

I'm active in our local church, VFW, and AFSA where I like to continue to take care of people. I served 30 years, probably 24 of those were great times (3 $hitty assignments), and the AF was pretty darn good to me and my family.
Best wishes to you for a successful and happy retirement!

Excellent response about loyalty. I am looking forward to that zero work stress.

FLAPS, USAF (ret)
02-02-2014, 08:07 PM
I got lucky and got hired as an AF civilian...after I had already dropped my paperwork. Biggest adjustment for me was wearing civ clothes in a military office, working for a Captain (a good one), and not addressing our Ops Officer (who I used to outrank) by name. Good thing is, I love working with these people and I've finally adjusted to being a civ. Plus, they get saddled with extra duties and PT, while I focus solely on the job. Also, when i get home at night the phone is turned off! On the financial side, between my GS pay, 0-4 retirement check and wife's new career we are making quite a bit more after taxes than I did on active duty. Life is good.

OtisRNeedleman
02-02-2014, 09:22 PM
Well, when I retired I knew my time on active duty was done and it was time to live the rest of my life. It wasn't the same AF I joined. Didn't like the direction in which I saw things going. So in that respect retiring was easy.

Had originally planned to retire back in Texas, but when I heard CA provided dependents of disabled veterans tuition to any state university or community college changed my residency to CA. At that time I resolved to suck up any resulting hardships so my kids could have those opportunities.

Far as camaraderie at civilian jobs, there can be some, but never to the extent I saw on active duty.

Work has been a challenge over the years. Have worked in five different industries. Been laid off several different ways, interspersed with periods of unemployment. Have worked at a job far below my education and experience to keep food on the table. Been out of work now since 2011 except for a couple of months doing a contractor job. I keep looking, keep applying, keep taking tests for various public-sector jobs, keep getting on eligible lists, keep getting interviews, keep not getting hired. Nearly 59. We've downsized. Can't relocate due to family needs. One way or another, we'll get by until I hit 62 and collect Social Security. I also buy my lottery tickets. Figure my chances of hitting the Lotto are better than ever getting another good job.

Not doing the pity party here. I made the conscious decision to accept hardships so my children could have opportunities. That part has worked out pretty well. Daughter graduated from a University of California campus. She's a realtor in LA, married last year, husband part-owner of a roofing company. Son attended community college, works. Stepdaughter applying to colleges/universities. Her tuition will be covered, and I'll be able to provide medical coverage, cell phone, and a bit more.

I am also lucky in other ways, and I remain grateful. AF pension and VA disability checks always come on time. Thanks to Tricare I had very affordable open-heart surgery for something that would have killed me otherwise. My wife works, a little, and that's about all she can do.

Don't know what anyone else here does for faith, but I just keep trusting in God to get us through. He has, so far. I trust God will get us the rest of the way across the bridge from the good times of the past to the good times to come.


Otis

Stalwart
02-02-2014, 10:05 PM
At that time I resolved to suck up any resulting hardships so my kids could have those opportunities.

BZ Otis ... BZ

Airborne
02-03-2014, 12:09 AM
The only hard part I had was trying to get away from the military. In that regard my biggest mistake was staying in 30 years. Don't stay in 30 years...companies don't want 50 year olds. I bet if you check the ranks of the long term unemployed you will find that most folks laid off in the great recession that have yet to find another job are about my age. It is discouraging. I didn't want a lot of money...I just wanted to try something totally new. I really wanted to work for the railroad and I tried for a year but have given up. Got one interview with CSX in a job that 2,000 people applied for...but I believe they were looking for someone younger because the school itself was 9 months long. I think I also would have done a lot better if I had been willing to apply for jobs that required moving but I promised my boys I wouldn't put them through that again.

So some GS's quit at my old unit and they did some emergency hires and I eventually went back there. I am grateful for the job but it wasn't what I had in mind. It wasn't hard to go back...just disappointing in a way. So I'll do this for awhile longer until my boys are both in college. Then I want to start my own business and not have to worry about chasing the next job.

I assume you retired at E9 at 30 yrs? Not sure why you couldnt have retired and not worked or at least worked as a "walmart greeter" as we all half jokingly say we are going to do. I guess those that pretend they live at E5 pay no matter what the rank are probably lying.

imnohero
02-03-2014, 01:01 AM
Airborne... life happens sometimes that ruins that plan. Speaking for myself, a divorce and the market crash in 08 pretty much wiped out any chance of my retiring and not working. The divorce is partly my fault, to be sure, but I knowingly chose to give her everything so I could "start clean". Financially not the wisest choice, but great for my mental health to never have to deal with her again. The market crash basically wiped out all my investment savings <shrug>, but that's how it goes. I'm not complaining, I'm saying that sometimes things happen that mean work after military retirement. "the best laid plans of mice and men...", ya know?

BRUWIN
02-03-2014, 01:02 AM
I assume you retired at E9 at 30 yrs? Not sure why you couldnt have retired and not worked or at least worked as a "walmart greeter" as we all half jokingly say we are going to do. I guess those that pretend they live at E5 pay no matter what the rank are probably lying.

I have two very smart boys and I want them to go to college and no have to take out any student loans. My oldest is looking at schools right now and the ones he's considering are far from cheap. I already have invested and saved a lot over the years...but I want something left for me and the wife once they are out of college. I could have probably lived off the E-9 retirement, but I really couldn't see myself at home. And...I just want the best for my family. It's really not fair to my kids to scrape by on an E-9 retirement when I could still be making some good money. The Walmart greeter thing isn't far off...just not right now.

OtisRNeedleman
02-03-2014, 02:38 AM
BZ Otis ... BZ

Thank you kindly. As a parent you learn to live beyond yourself. The children's needs came first.

Airborne
02-03-2014, 03:43 AM
Airborne... life happens sometimes that ruins that plan. Speaking for myself, a divorce and the market crash in 08 pretty much wiped out any chance of my retiring and not working. The divorce is partly my fault, to be sure, but I knowingly chose to give her everything so I could "start clean". Financially not the wisest choice, but great for my mental health to never have to deal with her again. The market crash basically wiped out all my investment savings <shrug>, but that's how it goes. I'm not complaining, I'm saying that sometimes things happen that mean work after military retirement. "the best laid plans of mice and men...", ya know?

know what you mean. The market crash wiped out my stocks (9/11 and 2008) and equity in my two houses. I just look at the pay charts and assume that anyone staying in all the way to 30 as enlisted scum would still be able to get by without looking for jobs and standing in line at the SS office every month (I know its electronic, just a metaphor). You cant predict the future but really staying in until 30 is more of a mistake it seems. You probably havent actually "worked" in your field in however many years, youre too old for the military and too old for any civilian company to take you on and too young to sit at home even if you have money, but you feel as if you deserve to be at least middle management. In the current fiscal climate, working until 20 to get 50% E6-E7 pay, only for an employer to think youre dumb and have PTSD to not hire you is not really worth it. We need to move to a 401K style retirement plan so those at that 12 year E6 mark can move. Maybe that would stop some of the stupidity as well. When you know your worker bees can walk at anytime, you might not treat them so bad. And the student loan bubble needs to pop.

LogDog
02-03-2014, 05:42 AM
On many threads, folks talk about the joys of retirement. Some of us are retiring this year. I will have my last day of active duty on May 16th and it will be glorious. When I read everyone's posts, I want to chime in and ask questions. But that is thread jacking so I created a new thread and want to ask retirees a few questions. Anyway, as some of you mentioned before, about half my life was spent in uniform so even though I know it's the right time to leave the AF, it's a little overwhelming to think I have to start all over again.

1. What was the hardest part of your transition? Seriously. For me I'm going to miss the interaction with the people I work with. Oh and buying a new wardrobe. That's a big pain in the ass too.
I didn't have a hard time transitioning. I took 60 days of terminal leave and relaxed. I had saved enough not to have to work and could live off my retirement and continue paying off my house without problems.


2. Is there the same sense of camaraderie in civilian businesses?
i worked for a civilian retail company before I came into the service so that was my only reference to the civilian working world. There was some camaraderie but there was also a high turnover of personnel so you really didn't develop long-term relationships with them.


3. How difficult was it for some of you to land a job? I know some of you actually retired from all work, that is not an option for me. I couldn't stay home for more than a week or two before my wife would kick me out.
Although I didn't need to work after retiring after 28 years i the AF I was still "young" enough in my mind to think I could work a couple more years and sock some more money away. Shortly after my terminal leave was finished and I was officially retired, I found a job listing for a GS-13 position with the VA. It was in California and I was in Florida but I applied anyway. I submitted a resume and was informed I would be given a telephone interview because of the condition. I must have done well enough because they offered me the job and I took it. I worked there for a couple of months and felt the atmosphere just wasn't for me so I quit. I had bought a condo in the San Diego area two years earlier that was being rented so I moved there and have remained ever since.


4. If some of you stayed in the same unit as a civil service employee post retirement, was it hard?
There are questions I have everyday and there are others in my unit retiring this year as well that I talk too. But I am curious to see if other retirees have the same issues.
I would have had a hard time staying in my unit as a civilian. Being the flight superintendent and then moving into a civilian slot would have meant I'd be working under some of the same people who worked for me. After time, I don't think they would have had a problem with it but having turned the flight around and then watching someone else come in and change thing may have been a bit hard for me.

Stalwart
02-03-2014, 05:58 PM
Thank you kindly. As a parent you learn to live beyond yourself. The children's needs came first.

I just became a parent a couple weeks ago, so have yet to make those types of sacrifices. I fully intend to if needed ... just glad to hear someone made (what I consider to be) the right call in that area.

BRUWIN
02-04-2014, 03:08 PM
I would have had a hard time staying in my unit as a civilian. Being the flight superintendent and then moving into a civilian slot would have meant I'd be working under some of the same people who worked for me.

Wasn't a big issue for me. I had a pretty good rapport with most of the troops that I worked with before I retired so when I came back it was no big deal. It's all first names now and although some of them struggled with that intially it's not an issue anymore. I had a few problem children when I was in uniform that I ended up sitting side by side with once I became a civilian and although a little weird at first we got through it. In fact...one of them PCS'd a few months back and when he left I wished him luck and told him I appreciated the fact that he put the past behind him when I came back as a civilian and thanked him for helping me get started working in the trenches again. I have yet to have one bad experience people-wise coming back to my old unit. I stay out of the Chief's way that replaced me...and I don't involve myself in any of the leadership's business, even when they are totally fucking things up. I just keep in mind that if I don't like the way they do things I can quit at anytime. And honestly...there are still days I forget that.

CYBERFX1024
02-04-2014, 03:56 PM
Thank you for confirming that for me. :) My military MOS is IT and Cyber Command is moving to my post so I think I will be ok when I punch out. Usually IT is age proof.

It depends... At my last duty station in the Marine Corps we had about 15 GS workers there that were assigned to Base Communications, I am a Electronic/Information Technician. I talked to an astounding great IT guy who was around 50 years old I bet, I saw that because he had the salt and pepper hair. He told me about times he tried to get a few jobs and the companies were really into him on the phone. But as soon as he showed up and saw how old he was then it went quickly to "we'll get back with you". Because they assumed that just because he was old that meant he wasn't accustomed to the new code and languages.

CYBERFX1024
02-04-2014, 04:07 PM
Airborne... life happens sometimes that ruins that plan. Speaking for myself, a divorce and the market crash in 08 pretty much wiped out any chance of my retiring and not working. The divorce is partly my fault, to be sure, but I knowingly chose to give her everything so I could "start clean". Financially not the wisest choice, but great for my mental health to never have to deal with her again. The market crash basically wiped out all my investment savings <shrug>, but that's how it goes. I'm not complaining, I'm saying that sometimes things happen that mean work after military retirement. "the best laid plans of mice and men...", ya know?

Your investment hasn't bounced back since then or did you just decide to sell at the time?

imnohero
02-04-2014, 04:26 PM
Your investment hasn't bounced back since then or did you just decide to sell at the time?

Has it bounced back? Short answer is no. Which leads to the second part...I sold when I started losing principle value. Generally, selling at a market low is not a good idea...but in this case, if I had stuck with the investment, I would have been "down" about 10k from the initial principle value ($30k) and would have broke even at the end of 2013. So the money is in a nice safe long term account that earns 2.5% interest. Not great, but I have no appetite for the risks of the stock market anymore.

LogDog
02-04-2014, 05:37 PM
Wasn't a big issue for me. I had a pretty good rapport with most of the troops that I worked with before I retired so when I came back it was no big deal. It's all first names now and although some of them struggled with that intially it's not an issue anymore. I had a few problem children when I was in uniform that I ended up sitting side by side with once I became a civilian and although a little weird at first we got through it. In fact...one of them PCS'd a few months back and when he left I wished him luck and told him I appreciated the fact that he put the past behind him when I came back as a civilian and thanked him for helping me get started working in the trenches again. I have yet to have one bad experience people-wise coming back to my old unit. I stay out of the Chief's way that replaced me...and I don't involve myself in any of the leadership's business, even when they are totally fucking things up. I just keep in mind that if I don't like the way they do things I can quit at anytime. And honestly...there are still days I forget that.
I wouldn't mind having worked in my career field but at a different base. I too got along with my troops and civilians but it would have felt uncomfortable for me to go from military to civilian and stay in the same place. I realize that over time those who were military who worked for me would PCS, retire, or get out and that would solve the problem but that would have taken a couple of years. If it was at a different base it would have been better in that I would be looked at as the "new guy" instead of as the former superintendent and the transition and group dynamic interactions would be smoother.

BISSBOSS
02-04-2014, 06:05 PM
1. What was the hardest part of your transition? Seriously. For me I'm going to miss the interaction with the people I work with. Oh and buying a new wardrobe. That's a big pain in the ass too.

A - The HARDEST part (for me) was... All things being equal, nobody cares what you are up to! You go to work, you go home and what you do is YOUR damned business. And my phone NEVER rings at O-Dark Thirty!

2. Is there the same sense of camaraderie in civilian businesses?

A - I guess it depends on where you work. I work in a small-ish company. HUGE sense of teamwork. People seek out innovation, improvement and batter ways to operate.

3. How difficult was it for some of you to land a job? I know some of you actually retired from all work, that is not an option for me. I couldn't stay home for more than a week or two before my wife would kick me out.

A - The wife and I budgeted for a year of job hunting/vacationing. I took 6 months off to do nothing after retirement, and got hired 8 months after my "mini-vacation. 14 months total.

4. If some of you stayed in the same unit as a civil service employee post retirement, was it hard?
There are questions I have everyday and there are others in my unit retiring this year as well that I talk too. But I am curious to see if other retirees have the same issues.

A - I did not. I retired in Europe and hung out for 6 months. I then REALLY started looking for work and had many interviews via telephone and tele-presence (Skype). Took another 6 months and got an interview... Took the offer and the rest was/is history. I do still work around the USAF (Part of the reason I was hired was BECAUSE I "spoke" Air Force) on numerous bases. It's not hard at all!

-BB-

MisterBen
02-04-2014, 07:21 PM
It depends... At my last duty station in the Marine Corps we had about 15 GS workers there that were assigned to Base Communications, I am a Electronic/Information Technician. I talked to an astounding great IT guy who was around 50 years old I bet, I saw that because he had the salt and pepper hair. He told me about times he tried to get a few jobs and the companies were really into him on the phone. But as soon as he showed up and saw how old he was then it went quickly to "we'll get back with you". Because they assumed that just because he was old that meant he wasn't accustomed to the new code and languages.

Roger. Either I get a baldie or use some grecian formula.

CYBERFX1024
02-04-2014, 07:44 PM
Has it bounced back? Short answer is no. Which leads to the second part...I sold when I started losing principle value. Generally, selling at a market low is not a good idea...but in this case, if I had stuck with the investment, I would have been "down" about 10k from the initial principle value ($30k) and would have broke even at the end of 2013. So the money is in a nice safe long term account that earns 2.5% interest. Not great, but I have no appetite for the risks of the stock market anymore.

What were your investments in if you don't mind me asking? Because on average ALMOST everything has bounced back to before recession levels. The last week I have lost $400 but I know I will gain it back in the long run.

imnohero
02-05-2014, 12:42 AM
What were your investments in if you don't mind me asking? Because on average ALMOST everything has bounced back to before recession levels. The last week I have lost $400 but I know I will gain it back in the long run.

I couldn't tell you the exact investments, the money was invested in a mutual fund with Amercan Funds. It was recommended as a low-moderate risk long term investment fund, which is what I was looking for in 02-03. And it was, except that the whole system collapsed, which most people didn't see coming.

Highest value in 07 was $31 per share, but I had bought at 22-25 in the preceding years (02-06). I sold in sept 08 at $24/25. Low was in december 08 at $18/share. Didn't go back up to over $25 per share until 2nd qrt 13, and over $31 per share until 3rd qrt 13.

BRUWIN
02-05-2014, 12:43 AM
What were your investments in if you don't mind me asking? Because on average ALMOST everything has bounced back to before recession levels. The last week I have lost $400 but I know I will gain it back in the long run.

Long term investing is the only way to go....short term investments can be like a weekend in Vegas. Long term...the market has ups and downs but grows over the course of time. Never cash out on the bottom end. If I had bailed during the late 90s tech bubble crash, or the 9/11 and 2008 crashes, I'd be a broke sumbitch. But I stayed and kept buying despite the crappy market. When it comes to retirement it's long term that yields results. It's just Americans have no patience and want a get rich quick scheme. I think more are learning though.

sandsjames
02-05-2014, 12:46 AM
I'm learning to spend what I have now because I might be dead tomorrow...it's working great...there's no chance of losing anything to the banks.

BRUWIN
02-05-2014, 01:08 AM
I'm learning to spend what I have now because I might be dead tomorrow...it's working great...there's no chance of losing anything to the banks.

A lot of Americans do that...then when they reach age 80 after living high on the hog in their early adult life complain that the government doesn't take care of them.

FLAPS, USAF (ret)
02-05-2014, 01:56 AM
A lot of Americans do that...then when they reach age 80 after living high on the hog in their early adult life complain that the government doesn't take care of them.

People are in their 30s and complaining the gubberment isn't doing enough to take care of them!

Absinthe Anecdote
02-05-2014, 02:12 AM
A lot of Americans do that...then when they reach age 80 after living high on the hog in their early adult life complain that the government doesn't take care of them.

I see your point, but the genetics in my family doesn't favor me making it very far into my 70s. A large percentage of the men in my family have checked out in their 50s and 60s due to heart disease and aneurisms.

I take care of myself but I am not going to budget for a long lifespan. I plan on enjoying my 50s and not work that much and travel as much as possible.

There is a balance that you need to achieve, but make no mistake, we are mortal beings. Your body really starts going to shit in your 60s and it accelerates each year afterword.

BOSS302
02-05-2014, 10:12 AM
A lot of Americans do that...then when they reach age 80 after living high on the hog in their early adult life complain that the government doesn't take care of them.


People are in their 30s and complaining the gubberment isn't doing enough to take care of them!

Society continues to glamorize youth. Now your 40s is considered "old" in MSM.

Absinthe Anecdote
02-05-2014, 11:29 AM
Society continues to glamorize youth. Now your 40s is considered "old" in MSM.

Unfortunately, you've crested the hill at 40 and each year you become less and less relevant to the core demographic.

I don't know if a right or wrong label even applies to that. It is just the way it is.

wxjumper
02-05-2014, 11:59 AM
If my early retirement request is accepted, the biggest thing I think I will miss is being able to fly my luggage for free.

CYBERFX1024
02-05-2014, 04:22 PM
If my early retirement request is accepted, the biggest thing I think I will miss is being able to fly my luggage for free.

I still get my luggage flown for free due to showing my GS id. I know I am not supposed to, but I am not complaining at all. I sure as hell don't want to pay that money when I am flying with my family of 4.

CYBERFX1024
02-05-2014, 04:24 PM
Long term investing is the only way to go....short term investments can be like a weekend in Vegas. Long term...the market has ups and downs but grows over the course of time. Never cash out on the bottom end. If I had bailed during the late 90s tech bubble crash, or the 9/11 and 2008 crashes, I'd be a broke sumbitch. But I stayed and kept buying despite the crappy market. When it comes to retirement it's long term that yields results. It's just Americans have no patience and want a get rich quick scheme. I think more are learning though.

That's what I am doing now. I am not to concerned about going down so much because I am in it for the long haul. I am 30 years old, so I have alot of time for the markets to fluctuate before I retire. The only reason it went down so much is because I have over $10k in my tsp right now.

CYBERFX1024
02-05-2014, 04:26 PM
I couldn't tell you the exact investments, the money was invested in a mutual fund with Amercan Funds. It was recommended as a low-moderate risk long term investment fund, which is what I was looking for in 02-03. And it was, except that the whole system collapsed, which most people didn't see coming.

Highest value in 07 was $31 per share, but I had bought at 22-25 in the preceding years (02-06). I sold in sept 08 at $24/25. Low was in december 08 at $18/share. Didn't go back up to over $25 per share until 2nd qrt 13, and over $31 per share until 3rd qrt 13.

I have been looking at doing mutual funds for another investment to coincide with my tsp. Pretty much everything across the board when you look at the 5-10year performance, you will see the huge drop in 2008.

BENDER56
02-05-2014, 04:51 PM
Long term investing is the only way to go....short term investments can be like a weekend in Vegas. Long term...the market has ups and downs but grows over the course of time. Never cash out on the bottom end. If I had bailed during the late 90s tech bubble crash, or the 9/11 and 2008 crashes, I'd be a broke sumbitch. But I stayed and kept buying despite the crappy market. When it comes to retirement it's long term that yields results. It's just Americans have no patience and want a get rich quick scheme. I think more are learning though.

I have an annuity that will pay out 30K+ per year for the rest of my life. Beyond that I don't worry too much about my investments anymore.

CYBERFX1024
02-05-2014, 05:06 PM
I have an annuity that will pay out 30K+ per year for the rest of my life. Beyond that I don't worry too much about my investments anymore.

Lucky you.

BRUWIN
02-05-2014, 06:19 PM
That's what I am doing now. I am not to concerned about going down so much because I am in it for the long haul. I am 30 years old, so I have alot of time for the markets to fluctuate before I retire. The only reason it went down so much is because I have over $10k in my tsp right now.

I started when i was 28 and I assume you started a little sooner. So yes...I have invested monthly for 23 years and have never taken a dollar out. I gave up a lot to do it. I never even had a second car in my family until I was a SMSgt. I did it with two kids since I was a MSGT and they've always had what they really wanted. It was tough...before 9/11 we weren't getting paid a whole lot to begin with. I could have bailed but didn't and I'm seeing the rewards now. And watch...because of it Obama or some other liberal will come along and devise a bill that excludes those that have saved and make them ineligible for social security. I'm just waiting for it.

CYBERFX1024
02-05-2014, 07:19 PM
I started when i was 28 and I assume you started a little sooner. So yes...I have invested monthly for 23 years and have never taken a dollar out. I gave up a lot to do it. I never even had a second car in my family until I was a SMSgt. I did it with two kids since I was a MSGT and they've always had what they really wanted. It was tough...before 9/11 we weren't getting paid a whole lot to begin with. I could have bailed but didn't and I'm seeing the rewards now. And watch...because of it Obama or some other liberal will come along and devise a bill that excludes those that have saved and make them ineligible for social security. I'm just waiting for it.

I started earlier. But I made the dumb decision at 25 to take roughly everything I had out but $900. So when I got to become a GS employee at 29, I only had roughly $1400 in my account. So I have built it back up since then. I started out at roughly 5% of my pay and now I am up to 15% of my pay going to tsp. I keep it diversified, but I am also willing to risk because I am so young.

I am half expecting something the way of what Cyprus did and get a % of everyone's savings account. But I am expecting that it will be on the scale of the IRA and that's why he is pushing for everyone to get a myIRA account.

fufu
02-05-2014, 07:31 PM
I started when i was 28 and I assume you started a little sooner. So yes...I have invested monthly for 23 years and have never taken a dollar out. I gave up a lot to do it. I never even had a second car in my family until I was a SMSgt. I did it with two kids since I was a MSGT and they've always had what they really wanted. It was tough...before 9/11 we weren't getting paid a whole lot to begin with. I could have bailed but didn't and I'm seeing the rewards now. And watch...because of it Obama or some other liberal will come along and devise a bill that excludes those that have saved and make them ineligible for social security. I'm just waiting for it.

You would certainly be in the minority in todays AF....and I assume in the old days too.

I started investing 5-6 years ago(26), but not much each month. Then, I got my collective $hit together and I max a Roth IRA contribution, plus my wife is matching the employer contribution for her 401K. We don't sacrifice everything. But we don't spend at the rate an average military family does these days.

I just did our taxes, $76K combined. I don't feel rich, but I certainly don't feel poor. I figure that if I(we) made another $1K a month, we could save like we want and do what we want. Thats only $100k annually. I can't imagine a life making $150K or $500K a year. There would be no reason not to enjoy your life.

LogDog
02-05-2014, 07:56 PM
You would certainly be in the minority in todays AF....and I assume in the old days too.

I started investing 5-6 years ago(26), but not much each month. Then, I got my collective $hit together and I max a Roth IRA contribution, plus my wife is matching the employer contribution for her 401K. We don't sacrifice everything. But we don't spend at the rate an average military family does these days.

I just did our taxes, $76K combined. I don't feel rich, but I certainly don't feel poor. I figure that if I(we) made another $1K a month, we could save like we want and do what we want. Thats only $100k annually. I can't imagine a life making $150K or $500K a year. There would be no reason not to enjoy your life.
I applaud you and your wife for your efforts to invest. When IRA were opened to the military back in 1984, I immediately opened an IRA with a bank paying 11% locked-in for five years. I didn't know much about investing so the five years was a good time for me to become educated. After the five years were up, I immediately recognized mutual funds was the way to go and rolled-over my bank IRA into a mutual fund IRA. I also opened a regular mutual fund with another company and it's been nearly 30 years since I opened them both and fortunately I haven't had to touch them. I rode out the lows of the stock market and over time I have more than made up any losses. I didn't convert my IRA to a Roth IRA when I had the chance because I did the math and I figured out it would have cost me more in the long run than keeping the regular IRA. However, if I was just starting out today I'd jump at the Roth IRA. I'll continue the strategy of wait and hold until I have to make mandatory withdraws of my IRA starting at age 72.

CYBERFX1024
02-05-2014, 08:30 PM
I applaud you and your wife for your efforts to invest. When IRA were opened to the military back in 1984, I immediately opened an IRA with a bank paying 11% locked-in for five years. I didn't know much about investing so the five years was a good time for me to become educated. After the five years were up, I immediately recognized mutual funds was the way to go and rolled-over my bank IRA into a mutual fund IRA. I also opened a regular mutual fund with another company and it's been nearly 30 years since I opened them both and fortunately I haven't had to touch them. I rode out the lows of the stock market and over time I have more than made up any losses. I didn't convert my IRA to a Roth IRA when I had the chance because I did the math and I figured out it would have cost me more in the long run than keeping the regular IRA. However, if I was just starting out today I'd jump at the Roth IRA. I'll continue the strategy of wait and hold until I have to make mandatory withdraws of my IRA starting at age 72.

First off good for you for contributing so much and planning early.

That's what I am doing right now is the RothIRA. I would love to do a original IRA, but honestly I figured that the government will swoop in sometime soon and take a percentage of the top. Right now I have VA disability as well as my GS job and that is big reason for me pushing more and more money to my retirement and savings accounts.

BRUWIN
02-06-2014, 01:17 AM
First off good for you for contributing so much and planning early.

That's what I am doing right now is the RothIRA. I would love to do a original IRA, but honestly I figured that the government will swoop in sometime soon and take a percentage of the top. Right now I have VA disability as well as my GS job and that is big reason for me pushing more and more money to my retirement and savings accounts.

Good on you...keep going. As it grows you'll only convince yourself more you did the right thing. My only concern now lies in the government taxing us even more to pay for the people that didn't do the same. I have investments outside of IRAs, that's where the government will screw me if we keep voting in administrations such as the current one. And nobody will care because so few of us did it. That is my concern these days. Our government is already backpedaling on retirement benefits...just wait. They will screw the private investor in major ways if it keeps up.

wxjumper
02-06-2014, 03:01 AM
I still get my luggage flown for free due to showing my GS id. I know I am not supposed to, but I am not complaining at all. I sure as hell don't want to pay that money when I am flying with my family of 4.
Is that your retirement ID? I was wondering if that would work or not. I would have thought the agents would have been tought the difference between a retirement ID and an active one.

Chief_KO
02-06-2014, 12:03 PM
That would be his GS civilian CAC. Only difference is the word "Civilian", looks just like the AD CAC.
Always great to see someone abusing the system.

wxjumper
02-06-2014, 12:56 PM
That would be his GS civilian CAC. Only difference is the word "Civilian", looks just like the AD CAC.
Always great to see someone abusing the system.
Darn, so I take it the retirement ID card won't work :(

DWWSWWD
02-06-2014, 01:41 PM
I still get my luggage flown for free due to showing my GS id. I know I am not supposed to, but I am not complaining at all. I sure as hell don't want to pay that money when I am flying with my family of 4. Knock it off, jackass.

Airborne
02-06-2014, 02:15 PM
Knock it off, jackass.

Hey, they are a part of the military too. Someone high ranking even said as much.

SomeRandomGuy
02-06-2014, 02:35 PM
I still get my luggage flown for free due to showing my GS id. I know I am not supposed to, but I am not complaining at all. I sure as hell don't want to pay that money when I am flying with my family of 4.

This right here is a good example of why there is basically nothing the AF can do to instill integrity in people. This guy just admitted he is willing to work the system in order to avoid paying baggage fees. So for a relatively small monetray gain he is willing to cheat the system. I used to see it all the time on travel vouchers. People would claim $2 per day for laundry for their entire TDY and $74.99 for as many taxis as they thought they could get away with.

Why are we suprised when nuke officers are cheating on a test in order to keep their job when people prove on a regular basis they are willing to cheat anything and everything if they think they can get away with it?

DWWSWWD
02-06-2014, 02:50 PM
Hey, they are a part of the military too. Someone high ranking even said as much. Funny at first glance but it made me think for a minute...... This civilian Airman bullshit may well have been a first step toward blurring the lines between civilian and military and making the erosion of our benefits OK. They do the same job, it's just that one group gets their work clothes purchased for them, right? We don't have civilian Airmen. We have Airmen and we have civilians, period. If you want to reset our culture and reinstill core values, why don't we start by remembering that?

DWWSWWD
02-06-2014, 02:53 PM
[QUOTE=SomeRandomGuy;668148]This guy just admitted he is willing to work the system in order to avoid paying baggage fees. [QUOTE] You call it working the system. I call it stealing. I call it stolen valor. Maybe if we spoke more clearly, folks wouldn't find themselves on the slippery slope.

CYBERFX1024
02-06-2014, 03:20 PM
This right here is a good example of why there is basically nothing the AF can do to instill integrity in people. This guy just admitted he is willing to work the system in order to avoid paying baggage fees. So for a relatively small monetray gain he is willing to cheat the system. I used to see it all the time on travel vouchers. People would claim $2 per day for laundry for their entire TDY and $74.99 for as many taxis as they thought they could get away with.

Why are we suprised when nuke officers are cheating on a test in order to keep their job when people prove on a regular basis they are willing to cheat anything and everything if they think they can get away with it?

How the hell is it stealing? When they ask for my ID I show them my GS CAC card because that is a valid form of id. I don't speak up and say "hey charge me $100 extra for my bags that I have". I am always honest on my travel vouchers and I only put down the stuff that is actually covered and NOT trying to slide by with sly sh$t.

CYBERFX1024
02-06-2014, 03:22 PM
[QUOTE=SomeRandomGuy;668148]This guy just admitted he is willing to work the system in order to avoid paying baggage fees. [QUOTE] You call it working the system. I call it stealing. I call it stolen valor. Maybe if we spoke more clearly, folks wouldn't find themselves on the slippery slope.

Stolen Valor? Really? I have earned what I have and everything I have accomplished. I have never stole any valor or tried to say I have something that I don't have. I am always truthful.

CYBERFX1024
02-06-2014, 03:23 PM
Knock it off, jackass.

Why should I knock it off? I use my valid Dept. of Interior CAC card as a form of id. So YOU KNOCK IT OFF.

CYBERFX1024
02-06-2014, 03:23 PM
Darn, so I take it the retirement ID card won't work :(

You can try it, I don't know if it will work or not. But it is a valid form of id.

DWWSWWD
02-06-2014, 03:29 PM
...... I know I am not supposed to........ I sure as hell don't want to pay that money Either I've made my point here or you're beyond reach.

SomeRandomGuy
02-06-2014, 03:44 PM
How the hell is it stealing? When they ask for my ID I show them my GS CAC card because that is a valid form of id. I don't speak up and say "hey charge me $100 extra for my bags that I have". I am always honest on my travel vouchers and I only put down the stuff that is actually covered and NOT trying to slide by with sly sh$t.

What if I go to a shoe store and put $100 pair of Nikes in a $20 converse box and then take it through the checkout. When they ask me for my purchase I hand it to them. I'm not going to be the person that speaks up and says these are actually $100 pair of Nikes. If they notice that's fine.

BENDER56
02-06-2014, 04:25 PM
Lucky you.

Luck had nothing to do with it -- it's my military retirement check from Uncle Sam.

Someone here pointed out on a different thread that in order to have enough money invested to have such an annuity, you'd have to have around one million. Think about that; people agonize over this or that investment strategy and what to invest/not invest in, only to likely end up with way less than what I'm going to merely get from my pension. That's why I quit worrying about investing about ten years ago. I have some mutual funds in an IRA but I don't follow what they're doing.

Measure Man
02-06-2014, 05:05 PM
How the hell is it stealing?

This is how:


I know I am not supposed to

LogDog
02-06-2014, 05:44 PM
How the hell is it stealing? When they ask for my ID I show them my GS CAC card because that is a valid form of id. I don't speak up and say "hey charge me $100 extra for my bags that I have". I am always honest on my travel vouchers and I only put down the stuff that is actually covered and NOT trying to slide by with sly sh$t.
What you're doing is dishonest in that you know you're not entitled to this but you are using the excuse the people who examine your ID didn't catch that you should be paying for your luggage. I worked for a Lt. who went home on leave to Brooklyn. His friend was in the NYPD and took him around one of the stations and out on a call. The Lt.'s friend would introduce him to other cops as a Lt., intentionally not mentioning that he's a USAF officer and not a cop, and the cops in the field would salute him. In another instances, a AF Captain I worked for would make reservations at Navy Lodging when he was on leave or TDY and he would tell the Navy receptionist he was a Captain. He didn't lie but he lead them to believe he was a Navy Captain (O-6) so he'd get a suite instead of a room.

Like you, the Lt. and the AF Captain, both knew they were giving a false impression of being someone they weren't in order to get something they weren't entitled.

HeyEng
02-06-2014, 06:04 PM
So how about getting back on track here? Those that will get to hang around and actaully get a pension could live fairly well..if they don't spend like a drunken sailor.

A couple of good places to look is: Mister Money Mustache and Extreme Early Retirement.

BRUWIN
02-06-2014, 06:08 PM
Luck had nothing to do with it -- it's my military retirement check from Uncle Sam.

Someone here pointed out on a different thread that in order to have enough money invested to have such an annuity, you'd have to have around one million. Think about that; people agonize over this or that investment strategy and what to invest/not invest in, only to likely end up with way less than what I'm going to merely get from my pension. That's why I quit worrying about investing about ten years ago. I have some mutual funds in an IRA but I don't follow what they're doing.

Very true...but I wouldn't call our pensions a guarantee anymore.

BRUWIN
02-06-2014, 06:18 PM
I know I was charged $300 for excess baggage on my way over here to Afghanistan and they certainly noticed my ID card was not military. I was trying to save the government some money so I showed them my military orders with my Government ID but they didn't care and still charged me. I didn't really care either knowing I would get reimbersed. Only the government comes out the loser in my case.

CYBERFX1024
02-06-2014, 06:42 PM
Luck had nothing to do with it -- it's my military retirement check from Uncle Sam.

Someone here pointed out on a different thread that in order to have enough money invested to have such an annuity, you'd have to have around one million. Think about that; people agonize over this or that investment strategy and what to invest/not invest in, only to likely end up with way less than what I'm going to merely get from my pension. That's why I quit worrying about investing about ten years ago. I have some mutual funds in an IRA but I don't follow what they're doing.

Well you didn't specify that earlier. So I understand now. Thanks.

SomeRandomGuy
02-06-2014, 06:58 PM
I know I was charged $300 for excess baggage on my way over here to Afghanistan and they certainly noticed my ID card was not military. I was trying to save the government some money so I showed them my military orders with my Government ID but they didn't care and still charged me. I didn't really care either knowing I would get reimbersed. Only the government comes out the loser in my case.

You should have just made a viral YouTube video like these Army guys. The airline would have refunded your fee even though the government reimburses excess baggage anyways.

SomeRandomGuy
02-06-2014, 06:59 PM
I know I was charged $300 for excess baggage on my way over here to Afghanistan and they certainly noticed my ID card was not military. I was trying to save the government some money so I showed them my military orders with my Government ID but they didn't care and still charged me. I didn't really care either knowing I would get reimbersed. Only the government comes out the loser in my case.

You should have just made a viral YouTube video like these Army guys. The airline would have refunded your fee even though the government reimburses excess baggage anyways.

http://abcnews.go.com/US/delta-charges-soldiers-3000-baggage-fees/story?id=13791417

akruse
02-06-2014, 08:32 PM
I know I was charged $300 for excess baggage on my way over here to Afghanistan and they certainly noticed my ID card was not military. I was trying to save the government some money so I showed them my military orders with my Government ID but they didn't care and still charged me. I didn't really care either knowing I would get reimbersed. Only the government comes out the loser in my case.

You're back over there?

LogDog
02-07-2014, 12:15 AM
Very true...but I wouldn't call our pensions a guarantee anymore.
For those who haven't yet retired that might be true but for those of us who are retired, I doubt Congress would even try to touch out retirement checks.

imported_chipotleboy
02-07-2014, 01:04 AM
For those who haven't yet retired that might be true but for those of us who are retired, I doubt Congress would even try to touch out retirement checks.

They just did...the Ryan-Murray budget deal that cut our guaranteed full COLA.

imported_chipotleboy
02-07-2014, 01:22 AM
1. What was the hardest part of your transition? Seriously. For me I'm going to miss the interaction with the people I work with. Oh and buying a new wardrobe. That's a big pain in the ass too.


For me, it was a loss of identity. I put a lot into earning my commission, surviving the 1992 Officer RIF, and tough promotions to O-4 and O-5. I was busting a$$ right until the last minute when I was able to start my outprocessing. I was an instructor in my last duty assignment, and graduation was within 45 days of my terminal leave start date, and I didn't have time for TAP, physical, etc... until I kicked my students out the door. There was no time to be ROAD and have a graceful transition. It was abrupt for me, and I really had a sense of "What now?" that first morning I woke up to my dog licking my face instead of the alarm clock going off.



2. Is there the same sense of camaraderie in civilian businesses?


I'm in the GS world working for the DoD. I work hard to build cameraderie among my civilian bretheren, and teach them to look out for each other as well as look out for our junior military folks who are away for training and deployments. I want them to provide the same kind of support to our uniformed folks just as if our military were assigned to an all military squadron. But we are probably an exception.



3. How difficult was it for some of you to land a job? I know some of you actually retired from all work, that is not an option for me. I couldn't stay home for more than a week or two before my wife would kick me out.


I had a hard time. I had lined up a job in the DoD about a year out from my retirement date, but shortly before terminal leave, a reorganization eliminated the job and nobody told me. So once I outprocess and let them know I can start anytime, SURPRISE!!! I had passed on several other jobs already, so I was justifiably upset. So I started looking in the private sector. However, instead of using my advanced degree and clearances for the hands-on work I was looking for, they only wanted me for "business development"--in other words, rent my rolodex until my contacts all move away, then kick me to the curb. Eventually I did land a job within the DoD, but not without the mid-level management having to overcome the reservations of the director who had an illegal policy of not wanting to hire retired military.



4. If some of you stayed in the same unit as a civil service employee post retirement, was it hard?
There are questions I have everyday and there are others in my unit retiring this year as well that I talk too. But I am curious to see if other retirees have the same issues.

I did go back to a prior unit when I retired. I had a very positive rep among the mid-level management, which helped when the d*ckhead director didn't want to hire me. They managed to overcome the director's anti-military bias. I wouldn't have been hired had I not had the positive rep from the prior assignment. Overall, I enjoy what I do. I get to do more of the "fun stuff" (actual mission), and avoid most of the BS. However, I am seeing the ugly side of the civil service world that I didn't see as a military guy, even as a field grade O. I still see grass being greener on this side. I don't miss the PFT, up-or-out, deployments or remotes dangling over my head. Being valued for what I bring to the mission and geographic stability are nice.

Best of luck to you.

AF2017
02-07-2014, 09:07 AM
For those of you looking for a job, what has been your biggest difficulty getting hired? Lack of or too much education? Too old? Missing certifications? Not qualified?

I'm on the fence about starting an MBA, part of me wants to get it and have the Air Force pay for it. The other part of me wonders if it's worth the time it will take to get. With my retire pay (E7), I don't think I'll have to make mega-bucks to live comfortably. Plus, I really don't want the extra-responsibility/headaches of upper to middle management, where I think the MBA would place me.

Chief_KO
02-07-2014, 12:10 PM
I would not stop pursuing any level of education while on AD. Remember, you control your resume. If you wish to start out at a certain level where an MBA would be an "overqualifier" don't list it on your resume.
Remember that each resume should be tailored to the position you are applying for...applying for a management position: emphasize your management experience, training, certifications, applying for a technical position: emphasize your technical experience, training, certifications.
The resume does not get you the job...it gets you the job interview.

DWWSWWD
02-07-2014, 01:24 PM
For those of you looking for a job, what has been your biggest difficulty getting hired? Lack of or too much education? Too old? Missing certifications? Not qualified?

I'm on the fence about starting an MBA, part of me wants to get it and have the Air Force pay for it. The other part of me wonders if it's worth the time it will take to get. With my retire pay (E7), I don't think I'll have to make mega-bucks to live comfortably. Plus, I really don't want the extra-responsibility/headaches of upper to middle management, where I think the MBA would place me. Do it. It keeps your mind sharp and keeps you in the company of like-minded ambitious people. Discussions inevitably turn to marketplace/job place conditions and are value added that way. I am applying for a job right now that appealed to me. The position reports to the Board of Directors. When I was doing my research, I realized that a person that I know very well from my Masters program had become the president of the board since I'd seen her last. Good or bad, she knows me very well and knows much more about my abilities and experience than a resume would show.

Measure Man
02-07-2014, 02:53 PM
For those of you looking for a job, what has been your biggest difficulty getting hired? Lack of or too much education? Too old? Missing certifications? Not qualified?

I'm on the fence about starting an MBA, part of me wants to get it and have the Air Force pay for it. The other part of me wonders if it's worth the time it will take to get. With my retire pay (E7), I don't think I'll have to make mega-bucks to live comfortably. Plus, I really don't want the extra-responsibility/headaches of upper to middle management, where I think the MBA would place me.

I am in an MBA program right now. Not so much that I need the degree, but what I need is the business knowledge.

Coming out of the AF I had all the technical knowledge...and knew about how the AF does business...but that's a lot different that how the business world does business.

My company pays $3K per year for my school...so I'm spending a little over that out of pocket (GI Bill went to my daughter). Would have been nice to do it while AD, of course, if you can find a local program...I prefer in-person classes rather than on-line. But, if you're okay with on-line, I'd say do it.

Airborne
02-07-2014, 03:30 PM
For me, it was a loss of identity. I put a lot into earning my commission, surviving the 1992 Officer RIF, and tough promotions to O-4 and O-5. I was busting a$$ right until the last minute when I was able to start my outprocessing. I was an instructor in my last duty assignment, and graduation was within 45 days of my terminal leave start date, and I didn't have time for TAP, physical, etc... until I kicked my students out the door. There was no time to be ROAD and have a graceful transition. It was abrupt for me, and I really had a sense of "What now?" that first morning I woke up to my dog licking my face instead of the alarm clock going off.

Me and a friend of mine were having a conversation about how officers must feel when they retire or separate (especially FGOs and general/Flag). Youve spent the better part of your life with people fawning over you, following you around, bending over backwards, calling you sir or ma'am and taking your every word as gospel. You get the best rooms at billeting and a company car with someone to drive it for you. Of course some will claim to not care for it or even disdain it, but we know a great many are drunk from that power to some degree. But then you retire and youve saved enough money to not have to work or get sort of a run of the mill job. So you go to wal mart or the Marriott and no one really knows or cares who you are. Some kid old enough to be a SrA calls you "brah". You have to drive yourself around. You cant get your dick sucked by a hot 25 yr old Lt or SSgt anymore because now your just an old man, not an O6. It really must be hard to come around to being just a normal member of society.

Measure Man
02-07-2014, 04:14 PM
..if they don't spend like a drunken sailor.

This is my problem.

BENDER56
02-07-2014, 04:25 PM
Well you didn't specify that earlier. So I understand now. Thanks.

Not specifying it was intentional.

imported_chipotleboy
02-07-2014, 06:50 PM
Me and a friend of mine were having a conversation about how officers must feel when they retire or separate (especially FGOs and general/Flag). Youve spent the better part of your life with people fawning over you, following you around, bending over backwards, calling you sir or ma'am and taking your every word as gospel. You get the best rooms at billeting and a company car with someone to drive it for you. Of course some will claim to not care for it or even disdain it, but we know a great many are drunk from that power to some degree. But then you retire and youve saved enough money to not have to work or get sort of a run of the mill job. So you go to wal mart or the Marriott and no one really knows or cares who you are. Some kid old enough to be a SrA calls you "brah". You have to drive yourself around. You cant get your dick sucked by a hot 25 yr old Lt or SSgt anymore because now your just an old man, not an O6. It really must be hard to come around to being just a normal member of society.

Someone has a severe case of shoulderboard envy.

Absinthe Anecdote
02-07-2014, 07:07 PM
Someone has a severe case of shoulderboard envy.

Nah, he's just being cute.

LogDog
02-07-2014, 07:08 PM
For those of you looking for a job, what has been your biggest difficulty getting hired? Lack of or too much education? Too old? Missing certifications? Not qualified?

I'm on the fence about starting an MBA, part of me wants to get it and have the Air Force pay for it. The other part of me wonders if it's worth the time it will take to get. With my retire pay (E7), I don't think I'll have to make mega-bucks to live comfortably. Plus, I really don't want the extra-responsibility/headaches of upper to middle management, where I think the MBA would place me.
If you're already retired and working for a company, go for it. If you're still active duty and near retirement you may want to wait until you're retired and already hired and in-place with a company. There's a reason I recommend this.

With the economy not as healthy as we'd like it to be, you'll be competing with a lot of people who already have an MBA. The companies you apply to may not be needing MBAs at this time. Someone applying for a job with an MBA may be looked upon by a company as someone who is filling a position below their education level and given the opportunity they'll leave as soon as a job matching their MBA education comes open. If you apply and get accepted for a job that matches your education level then you're ready to begin your MBA program. Once you complete it you'll be competitive for promotion within the company or with other companies. The thing that will standout on your resume is when it comes to education, you didn't stop learning. You are in a continuous process of learning whereas those already holding an MBA most likely aren't continuing their education.

SomeRandomGuy
02-07-2014, 07:13 PM
Me and a friend of mine were having a conversation about how officers must feel when they retire or separate (especially FGOs and general/Flag). Youve spent the better part of your life with people fawning over you, following you around, bending over backwards, calling you sir or ma'am and taking your every word as gospel. You get the best rooms at billeting and a company car with someone to drive it for you. Of course some will claim to not care for it or even disdain it, but we know a great many are drunk from that power to some degree. But then you retire and youve saved enough money to not have to work or get sort of a run of the mill job. So you go to wal mart or the Marriott and no one really knows or cares who you are. Some kid old enough to be a SrA calls you "brah". You have to drive yourself around. You cant get your dick sucked by a hot 25 yr old Lt or SSgt anymore because now your just an old man, not an O6. It really must be hard to come around to being just a normal member of society.

At my first base in 2006 we had a female wing commander. She was single and I think around 50 years old. She was quite the drunk/alcoholic. There were at least 2 or 3 different occassions where the command chief pulled her off stage at ALS graduations because she was slurring her words and rambling. The command Cheif was basically her babysitter and DD the entire 2 years. She had an insane schedule (outlook calendar was booked 0700-1900 weeks in advance). I kind of think she felt like she missed out on quite a bit by chasing her career. She was between 40-50 never married and no kids. After she retired she actually stayed here in the area. I ran into her one time at the college party district after she retired. She actually rented an apartment down there and she lives there. I think she really hated the spotlight and how she couldn't get any privacy as the commander. I guarantee she was elated the day she could retire and a bunch of college kids would start calling her babe or brah.

Rusty Jones
02-07-2014, 07:24 PM
Me and a friend of mine were having a conversation about how officers must feel when they retire or separate (especially FGOs and general/Flag). Youve spent the better part of your life with people fawning over you, following you around, bending over backwards, calling you sir or ma'am and taking your every word as gospel. You get the best rooms at billeting and a company car with someone to drive it for you. Of course some will claim to not care for it or even disdain it, but we know a great many are drunk from that power to some degree. But then you retire and youve saved enough money to not have to work or get sort of a run of the mill job. So you go to wal mart or the Marriott and no one really knows or cares who you are. Some kid old enough to be a SrA calls you "brah". You have to drive yourself around. You cant get your dick sucked by a hot 25 yr old Lt or SSgt anymore because now your just an old man, not an O6. It really must be hard to come around to being just a normal member of society.


Ha! Very true. I work in a job where a bachelor's degree is the de facto requirement to get hired into, and most of us have master's degree. Military officers get shit that's normally reserved for executives among civilian employers when, in the military, only generals and admirals are "executives."

Yet still... I call my boss, my boss's boss, and my boss's boss's boss ALL by their first names. I love it!

OtisRNeedleman
02-07-2014, 08:41 PM
For those of you looking for a job, what has been your biggest difficulty getting hired? Lack of or too much education? Too old? Missing certifications? Not qualified?

I'm on the fence about starting an MBA, part of me wants to get it and have the Air Force pay for it. The other part of me wonders if it's worth the time it will take to get. With my retire pay (E7), I don't think I'll have to make mega-bucks to live comfortably. Plus, I really don't want the extra-responsibility/headaches of upper to middle management, where I think the MBA would place me.

As time has gone by, biggest difficulty is age. After retiring at 43, not overly hard to find a job, but after getting laid off at 46 took over a year to find a job. Got laid off from that job after five months. Out three months, got a temp consulting-type gig for five months. Then out for a year. Spent the next six years doing a job far beneath my education and experience, but it kept food on the table. Laid off from that in early 2011, took 21 months to find the next job at 57. That job ended in Dec 2012, still out. Turning 59 soon. Figure I probably have a better chance of hitting the lottery than ever getting another job worthy of the name.

Looking back, of the group of guys that retired or got out of the service around the time I did, know of only one guy who got a job soon after retirement and is in that same job. Everyone else has had multiple jobs, occasionally interspersed with periods of unemployment.

sandsjames
02-07-2014, 08:49 PM
Have been retired for just over 6 months. I have had two job opportunities prior and will be taking the 3rd one. It depends where your pride is at and how you set yourself up. Timing and location always help, with a little luck. I'll be getting a GS9 position as a tech school instructor (ironically enough, this job opened up due to the previous furloughs and manning getting moved around so...thank you poor economy). The other 2 jobs were just over minimum wage and would have been more than enough to live comfortably in conjunction with my retirement check but since it wasn't needed I didn't feel the urge to jump on it. This job I'm going to be doing is the only opportunity at which I would have even thought about taking. Didn't plan on working but this is too good to pass up.

So the opportunities are out there. The key question to ask yourself is what are you willing to take and what are you willing to give up?

Airborne
02-07-2014, 09:57 PM
Someone has a severe case of shoulderboard envy.

That couldn't be further from the truth. It was actually a serious question and thanks to those who answered honestly and anecdotally.
The one thing I hear from everyone regardless of rank is that they enjoy spending more time with their families and all the late nights and long deployments weren't really worth missing kids growing up and going to soccer games and dance recitals.

Absinthe Anecdote
02-07-2014, 11:46 PM
That couldn't be further from the truth. It was actually a serious question and thanks to those who answered honestly and anecdotally.
The one thing I hear from everyone regardless of rank is that they enjoy spending more time with their families and all the late nights and long deployments weren't really worth missing kids growing up and going to soccer games and dance recitals.

You practically indicted every O-6 and above for getting oral sex from from young LTs and SSgts and then accused them of going around lamenting the fact that they don't get free rental cars and attentive hotel service on business trips.

Now you are getting a pissy attitude chipotleboy for calling you on it?

Don't you think you are being a little harsh?

You want an honest answer about loss of prestige after retiring? I'll try to give it to you.

I retired as an E-7, nothing special at all; however, I did have a reputation and I did have a certain degree of respect that preceded me. When I was still active, people gave me the benefit of the doubt that I had my shit together. If I lived up to my reputation and the chevrons on my sleeve, no problem.

After I retired, I went to the Pentagon as a contractor and had to prove myself every step of the way.

No problem, I was willing to prove my worth, but I did miss the courtesy of being respected until I proved myself either worthy or unworthy.

I think what caused me the biggest pains or turbulence, was the fact that my retirement coincided with the onset of middle-age depression.

Not really a big deal, it is a natural part of the aging process; however, it did throw me for a loop. I joined the Air Force when I was 18 years old, and the Air Force did become a major part of my life. It was harder to let go of, than I ever imagined.

It is perhaps a big reason why I come to this forum and fuck around so much. I am not one who feels comfortable announcing their veteran status, and I do not expect any special treatment; however, I do miss people who understand where I am coming from.

Last year, I walked away from a 135K per year contracting job to go back to school and learn a new set of skills. Some friends told me I was crazy, but I think I did the right thing, because it broke the spell of middle-age depression and I'm happier than I have been in years.

I do regret how my time on active duty complicated my relationships with my family. I always admired those who maintained strong family ties while serving. I made a mess of my relationships, but, I can not honestly blame that on the Air Force.

All I can claim, was that since I was often far away from my children, it made it harder to maintain a close relationship with them. My failure in doing that, was completely my own. That is my biggest regret about serving, but it was entirely my fault.

The Air Force is far from perfect, it is a human endeavor, you should expect it to be inherently flawed, just like all humans are.

My advice, don't get wrapped up in the flaws of humanity, but try to enjoy those times when we do exceed the norm.

One thing that the Air Force did give me, was the opportunity to do just that, exceed the norm.

Airborne
02-08-2014, 01:39 AM
You practically indicted every O-6 and above for getting oral sex from from young LTs and SSgts and then accused them of going around lamenting the fact that they don't get free rental cars and attentive hotel service on business trips.

Now you are getting a pissy attitude chipotleboy for calling you on it?

Don't you think you are being a little harsh?

You want an honest answer about loss of prestige after retiring? I'll try to give it to you.

I retired as an E-7, nothing special at all; however, I did have a reputation and I did have a certain degree of respect that preceded me. When I was still active, people gave me the benefit of the doubt that I had my shit together. If I lived up to my reputation and the chevrons on my sleeve, no problem.

After I retired, I went to the Pentagon as a contractor and had to prove myself every step of the way.

No problem, I was willing to prove my worth, but I did miss the courtesy of being respected until I proved myself either worthy or unworthy.

I think what caused me the biggest pains or turbulence, was the fact that my retirement coincided with the onset of middle-age depression.

Not really a big deal, it is a natural part of the aging process; however, it did throw me for a loop. I joined the Air Force when I was 18 years old, and the Air Force did become a major part of my life. It was harder to let go of, than I ever imagined.

It is perhaps a big reason why I come to this forum and fuck around so much. I am not one who feels comfortable announcing their veteran status, and I do not expect any special treatment; however, I do miss people who understand where I am coming from.

Last year, I walked away from a 135K per year contracting job to go back to school and learn a new set of skills. Some friends told me I was crazy, but I think I did the right thing, because it broke the spell of middle-age depression and I'm happier than I have been in years.

I do regret how my time on active duty complicated my relationships with my family. I always admired those who maintained strong family ties while serving. I made a mess of my relationships, but, I can not honestly blame that on the Air Force.

All I can claim, was that since I was often far away from my children, it made it harder to maintain a close relationship with them. My failure in doing that, was completely my own. That is my biggest regret about serving, but it was entirely my fault.

The Air Force is far from perfect, it is a human endeavor, you should expect it to be inherently flawed, just like all humans are.

My advice, don't get wrapped up in the flaws of humanity, but try to enjoy those times when we do exceed the norm.

One thing that the Air Force did give me, was the opportunity to do just that, exceed the norm.

I guess you missed the hyperbole of my statement but you answered it on your own. No Im not indicting every O6 of having LTs suck his dick, but when you are 45ish-55ish year old male and youve had people fawn over you of course youre gonna flirt with your young female subordinates whether you take it further or not. And basically you said you wanted respect because your an awesome E-7 but you could back it up with your capabilities, but you became a contractor so it was the opposite. I would suspect the same thing for high ranking Os. Colonel walks in and everyone shits their pants and we not only salute him but the car he is riding in being driven by some skivvy. He gets the best room on base, his own room to shower in after working out, etc. You get out and much of that is no longer available (some of it still is though). All this coincides with male mid-life crisis which unnaturally gets skipped for them because they are getting everything that most of us are depressed about. Money, power, and influence over females.

fog
02-08-2014, 05:32 AM
Very nicely written Otis.

fog
02-08-2014, 05:51 AM
I was her Command Chief during this time. She is not a drunk/alcoholic and I never "pulled" her off the stage. She does not rent a place there, she has a home. BTW, she is a vice president of a huge company in that area. She officiated my retirement years later because not only do I respect her, but I've grown to admire and love her. Time for you to publically apologize.

Gonzo432
02-08-2014, 09:58 AM
I was her Command Chief during this time. She is not a drunk/alcoholic and I never "pulled" her off the stage. She does not rent a place there, she has a home. BTW, she is a vice president of a huge company in that area. She officiated my retirement years later because not only do I respect her, but I've grown to admire and love her. Time for you to publically apologize.

Are you both referring to the same individual?

Mcjohn1118
02-08-2014, 02:19 PM
I guess you missed the hyperbole of my statement but you answered it on your own. No Im not indicting every O6 of having LTs suck his dick, but when you are 45ish-55ish year old male and youve had people fawn over you of course youre gonna flirt with your young female subordinates whether you take it further or not. And basically you said you wanted respect because your an awesome E-7 but you could back it up with your capabilities, but you became a contractor so it was the opposite. I would suspect the same thing for high ranking Os. Colonel walks in and everyone shits their pants and we not only salute him but the car he is riding in being driven by some skivvy. He gets the best room on base, his own room to shower in after working out, etc. You get out and much of that is no longer available (some of it still is though). All this coincides with male mid-life crisis which unnaturally gets skipped for them because they are getting everything that most of us are depressed about. Money, power, and influence over females.
Airborne, I think you're onto something. I've been to TAPS twice and both times with different administrators, we were told that Wing CCs and the like, had the hardest time transitioning to the civilian world. I didn't ask for facts to back it up, so nobody ask for the studies. But the way it was explained is that, in a way, the BGs/Colonels are someone of power in the military. They wield huge influence and run a small city. But on the outside, unless they already are set up for a high paying executive job, they are competing for jobs that others have the same qualifications for. It's a bruise to their ego that they have to start all over again. For an unscientific poll, are they any retired O-6s/O-7s on here that wish to comment? Was it a harder transition?

FLAPS, USAF (ret)
02-08-2014, 02:36 PM
Airborne, I think you're onto something. I've been to TAPS twice and both times with different administrators, we were told that Wing CCs and the like, had the hardest time transitioning to the civilian world. I didn't ask for facts to back it up, so nobody ask for the studies. But the way it was explained is that, in a way, the BGs/Colonels are someone of power in the military. They wield huge influence and run a small city. But on the outside, unless they already are set up for a high paying executive job, they are competing for jobs that others have the same qualifications for. It's a bruise to their ego that they have to start all over again. For an unscientific poll, are they any retired O-6s/O-7s on here that wish to comment? Was it a harder transition?

I'm obviously not a retired O-6, but I know several who had no problem with checking the ego when they left. The trick is, if you can remain humble throughout your career, be personable and remember that the rank is what you wear and the institution you represent, not the person you are on the inside, then you can leave the AF and still be comfortable just being you. Those who have trouble with this upon retirement typically weren't very good leaders to begin with (in my opinion). Some people just need to ask themselves an honest question, and that is "would people still want to follow my lead if I had no rank?" If the answer is yes, then hanging up that rank after a long career won't be such an issue. Remember, the rank is what you wear, not the person you are!

Chief_KO
02-08-2014, 02:53 PM
Everyone is on track, it's not the rank but the person wearing the rank. I'm quite content with my simple "worker-bee" job. After 12 years as a SNCO (6 as a Chief) it is a relief not to be "the guy". Not everyone who retires from the military in a position of authority is willing to follow the instructions of someone younger (sometimes much younger). When you retire, that part of your life is complete...time to move on. About 1/4 of my co-workers call my Mr., 1/4 call me Chief, 1/2 call me by my first name and it is all okay by me.

I remember back in 1989, getting on the shuttle bus from Keesler to the New Orleans airport, I recognized the driver as the former first sergeant (CMSgt) from the student squadron I was assigned to as a retrainee. After we got on the road I asked him, "excuse me but are you Chief X." He replied "Yep, I was now you can call me Bob, your shuttle driver." Before I could ask the next question he told me how happy he was doing this simple job. Driving 4 round trips per day, shuttling Airmen to/from the airport. Other than rainy days and the occasional traffic jam, no worries he said.

LogDog
02-08-2014, 06:06 PM
Everyone is on track, it's not the rank but the person wearing the rank. I'm quite content with my simple "worker-bee" job. After 12 years as a SNCO (6 as a Chief) it is a relief not to be "the guy". Not everyone who retires from the military in a position of authority is willing to follow the instructions of someone younger (sometimes much younger). When you retire, that part of your life is complete...time to move on. About 1/4 of my co-workers call my Mr., 1/4 call me Chief, 1/2 call me by my first name and it is all okay by me.

I remember back in 1989, getting on the shuttle bus from Keesler to the New Orleans airport, I recognized the driver as the former first sergeant (CMSgt) from the student squadron I was assigned to as a retrainee. After we got on the road I asked him, "excuse me but are you Chief X." He replied "Yep, I was now you can call me Bob, your shuttle driver." Before I could ask the next question he told me how happy he was doing this simple job. Driving 4 round trips per day, shuttling Airmen to/from the airport. Other than rainy days and the occasional traffic jam, no worries he said.
Sounds similar to a guy we had at Myrtle Beach AFB in the late 70s. He was a retired Navy Lt. Commander and his civil service job on base was as the base "taxi" driver. If you had official business requiring you to travel to different places around the base, you could call the transportation squadron and request a "taxi" which was a small pickup truck and driver. The retired LtCmdr said he loved his new job because there was little responsibility, little pressure, and he enjoyed meeting people. Surprisingly, this was almost the same thing a retired Lt.Col at another base gave for being the head bagger at the commissary. I didn't look down on them since they're enjoying what they did and that's the goal of retirement.

BOSS302
02-08-2014, 06:34 PM
I didn't look down on them since they're enjoying what they did and that's the goal of retirement.

Why would you look down on taxi drivers or grocery baggers at all?

BRUWIN
02-08-2014, 11:19 PM
You're back over there?

Yeah...you guys fucked this thing all up after I left last time. I'm here to fix it all again. I was by-name, hand picked, personally requested.

Capt Alfredo
02-09-2014, 01:53 AM
Yeah...you guys fucked this thing all up after I left last time. I'm here to fix it all again. I was by-name, hand picked, personally requested.

You go on with your bad self, and start "spearheading" your way to victory!

BRUWIN
02-09-2014, 03:24 AM
You go on with your bad self, and start "spearheading" your way to victory!

Only 7 weeks to finish cleaning this mess up Sir....but I embrace challenge. My efforts will be "paramount" to victory.

OtisRNeedleman
02-09-2014, 11:56 PM
Only 7 weeks to finish cleaning this mess up Sir....but I embrace challenge. My efforts will be "paramount" to victory.


Yes, GS-11 BRUWIN will lead us to victory, polka-dotted umbrella in hand!

Chief_KO
02-10-2014, 12:02 PM
I hear the Taliban commits Hari-Kari at the mere sight of anything polka-dotted.

LogDog
02-10-2014, 07:38 PM
Why would you look down on taxi drivers or grocery baggers at all?
I may have stated it poorly but the impression one would get is a retired officer would have a better paying job with more responsibility. The fact they had these jobs they enjoyed tells me they made the right choice.

LogDog
02-10-2014, 07:40 PM
I hear the Taliban commits Hari-Kari at the mere sight of anything polka-dotted.
I thought it was BRUWIN was going to teach them to dance the Polka while carrying polka-dotted umbrellas. That's the definition of victory.

sandsjames
02-10-2014, 09:21 PM
Why would you look down on taxi drivers or grocery baggers at all?

Because if they didn't enjoy what they were doing, as with everyone in any profession, you've GOT to look down on them...don't you know anything? People who choose bagging and taxi driving just to do their best to support their families are DBs. If they don't need it, but enjoy it, then it's ok.

BOSS302
02-10-2014, 09:28 PM
Because if they didn't enjoy what they were doing, as with everyone in any profession, you've GOT to look down on them...don't you know anything? People who choose bagging and taxi driving just to do their best to support their families are DBs. If they don't need it, but enjoy it, then it's ok.

How many times did a MEP 805A fall on your head?

OtisRNeedleman
02-10-2014, 09:33 PM
How many times did a MEP 805A fall on your head?


I trust he was just kidding.

sandsjames
02-10-2014, 10:40 PM
How many times did a MEP 805A fall on your head?

None...now the doors of a MEP 7 on a windy day...several times. And think, I'm gonna be teaching the troops you'll be receiving at your base...and now I don't even have to try cuz I'll never have to worry about being stationed with any of them...

BRUWIN
02-11-2014, 08:31 PM
Yes, GS-11 BRUWIN will lead us to victory, polka-dotted umbrella in hand!

I will never live that freakin incident down will I.

OtisRNeedleman
02-12-2014, 12:32 AM
I will never live that freakin incident down will I.

No. But that also means you won't be forgotten.