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AJBIGJ
01-13-2014, 03:14 PM
I brought this up in another thread, I think most of us are familiar at least with the concept of Affirmative Action and all of the legislation that was involved with the Civil Rights movement during the 1960's. Now 50 years later, how far have we really come? How often does a standard workforce in America really reflect a "melting pot" of society?

I would contend that happens only infrequently. I offer the hypothesis that more often you will see certain race/gender/ethnicity demographics in a very sizable majority in an average workforce in a local company, with only a few outliers in the minority demographics.

I do not think this is a factor of racism/sexism/etc. in most cases. One has to factor in the average composition of those same demographics in the local community, their economic mobility, the type of work involved, and many other such things. There is also a comfort factor involved, despite the cultural progress over the last half century, it can be difficult for someone to be a "minority" in their organization, just for the sake of feeling welcome.

I would like to leverage others experiences in this matter, do you agree that, statistically, there seems to be a larger preponderance of a certain demographic in most places of work? If you've seen something that seemed balanced, was it also the case in the local community as well?

sandsjames
01-13-2014, 04:04 PM
I brought this up in another thread, I think most of us are familiar at least with the concept of Affirmative Action and all of the legislation that was involved with the Civil Rights movement during the 1960's. Now 50 years later, how far have we really come? How often does a standard workforce in America really reflect a "melting pot" of society?

I would contend that happens only infrequently. I offer the hypothesis that more often you will see certain race/gender/ethnicity demographics in a very sizable majority in an average workforce in a local company, with only a few outliers in the minority demographics.

I do not think this is a factor of racism/sexism/etc. in most cases. One has to factor in the average composition of those same demographics in the local community, their economic mobility, the type of work involved, and many other such things. There is also a comfort factor involved, despite the cultural progress over the last half century, it can be difficult for someone to be a "minority" in their organization, just for the sake of feeling welcome.

I would like to leverage others experiences in this matter, do you agree that, statistically, there seems to be a larger preponderance of a certain demographic in most places of work? If you've seen something that seemed balanced, was it also the case in the local community as well?

I have no stats but from what I've seen, generally, most work places seem to represent the surrounding community pretty well. I can only speak for the businesses I see/frequent. I can't speak for larger corporations and upper management positions which, I believe, is probably where most of the contention comes in.

garhkal
01-13-2014, 06:53 PM
It also depends imo on what the work is.. I know going through many different fast food joints in the area, the majority of the work forces all seem to be latino or africian american. Where as at the upper restaurants (chillies, TGIF etc) the amt of white folk compared to others goes up.

RetC141BFCC
01-13-2014, 08:19 PM
I brought this up in another thread, I think most of us are familiar at least with the concept of Affirmative Action and all of the legislation that was involved with the Civil Rights movement during the 1960's. Now 50 years later, how far have we really come? How often does a standard workforce in America really reflect a "melting pot" of society?

I would contend that happens only infrequently. I offer the hypothesis that more often you will see certain race/gender/ethnicity demographics in a very sizable majority in an average workforce in a local company, with only a few outliers in the minority demographics.

I do not think this is a factor of racism/sexism/etc. in most cases. One has to factor in the average composition of those same demographics in the local community, their economic mobility, the type of work involved, and many other such things. There is also a comfort factor involved, despite the cultural progress over the last half century, it can be difficult for someone to be a "minority" in their organization, just for the sake of feeling welcome.

I would like to leverage others experiences in this matter, do you agree that, statistically, there seems to be a larger preponderance of a certain demographic in most places of work? If you've seen something that seemed balanced, was it also the case in the local community as well?

I taught at a historically black college (aviation Dept) There were 16 other African Americans and me. I use to laugh and say I was the token white dude. Times have changed I beleive. I took a lot of shit but for being a Fly Boy. 15 of the other 16 people who worked there were either former Army or Navy. When I moved to the Airlines I got a few of my students jobs there, I think it all about networking and now a lot more blacks and whites hang out together live together and where I live help each other out.

Rainmaker
02-08-2014, 06:03 PM
Rainmaker been busy. But, juss droppin in to give this thread some street cred. Happy Black History Momf Muhfuggas!

Greg
02-08-2014, 08:49 PM
Section 8 Housing has spread from the inner city to outer ring suburbs in the last ten to fifteen years. Also, specific municipal bus routes that start in the inner city, enter the highway and exit an outer ring suburb near a major shopping mall where there is a noticeable increase of employed inner city youth.