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Juggs
11-14-2013, 09:49 PM
Seriously? 1999 and only 1400 hrs warrants it to be a museum piece? That's stupid.

BOSS302
11-14-2013, 09:58 PM
This is one of the only times I wish Robert F. Dorr was here to berate an awfully-uninformative post such as one like this.

SomeRandomGuy
11-14-2013, 11:25 PM
This is one of the only times I wish Robert F. Dorr was here to berate an awfully-uninformative post such as one like this.

RFD is gone and I can't help there but maybe I can channel my inner Robot Chicken to help out.


Seriously? 1999 and only 1400 hrs warrants it to be a museum piece? That's stupid.

:thoughtbubble::wtf::sleeping2::fest30::usaflag:

Absinthe Anecdote
11-15-2013, 02:00 AM
To make matters worse this is a really old story...

The aircraft on display (S/N 91-4003) was one of nine F-22s built for Engineering, Manufacture and Development (EMD) testing, and it rolled off the Lockheed Martin assembly line in Georgia on May 22, 1999. Assigned to the 412th Test Wing at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif., the aircraft made its first flight on March 6, 2000. After completing its phase in the test program, this aircraft came to the museum in January 2007. It is painted to represent an F-22A flown by the 1st Fighter Wing at Langley Air Force Base, Va.

http://www.nationalmuseum.af.mil/factsheets/factsheet.asp?id=8389

If that is what he is talking about. I'm not sure?

OtisRNeedleman
11-15-2013, 04:41 AM
No surprise....what sounds like a perfectly good fighter just flushed down the drain. Cripes, we routinely fly B-52s older than anyone flying them.

Absinthe Anecdote
11-15-2013, 11:26 AM
I didn't double check this, but it sounds plausible.

Airframe was overstressed during tests with two external tanks. G-load limiter was exceeded when control was lost after the aircraft passed through the wake of an F-16. Maximum was to be 7.3 Gs but actually climbed to 11.7 Gs. Flight control software was found to be the problem. The aircraft landed safely but never flew again.

Giant Voice
11-15-2013, 02:18 PM
Ship 003 was never meant to see regular service. I want to say Ship 002 is sitting at Tyndall as a ground trainer. Can anybody confirm?

denmom
11-15-2013, 02:34 PM
To make matters worse this is a really old story...

The aircraft on display (S/N 91-4003) was one of nine F-22s built for Engineering, Manufacture and Development (EMD) testing, and it rolled off the Lockheed Martin assembly line in Georgia on May 22, 1999. Assigned to the 412th Test Wing at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif., the aircraft made its first flight on March 6, 2000. After completing its phase in the test program, this aircraft came to the museum in January 2007. It is painted to represent an F-22A flown by the 1st Fighter Wing at Langley Air Force Base, Va.

http://www.nationalmuseum.af.mil/factsheets/factsheet.asp?id=8389

If that is what he is talking about. I'm not sure?

He's talking about the CV-22 that's going to the museum. It was a test bed aircraft.

Here is the link to the article.

http://www.airforcetimes.com/article/20131114/NEWS04/311140027/First-CV-22-heads-museum

The first of the Air Force’s Ospreys, one of the newest members of the Air Force’s fleet, is already heading to a museum.

The CV-22, tail number 21, was delivered to the Air Force in 1999 and has logged 1,400 flight hours testing new equipment for special operators. It is heading to the National Museum of the Air Force at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio.

“It’s a great bird,” said Lt. Col. Darrin Hoenle, commander of the 413th Flight Test Squadron at Eglin Air Force Base, Fla., where the Osprey was assigned. “It had one of the highest launch-reliability rates in the Air Force.”

But despite its reliability, the Osprey will retire because it does not fit with the rest of the Air Force’s fleet.

Tail number 21 began as an MV-22 assigned to the Marine Corps, Hoenle said. It was converted to a CV-22 configuration in 2003 to become the main test Osprey for the Air Force. Originally assigned to Edwards Air Force Base, Calif., it conducted 400 hours of initial testing before being assigned to Eglin.

The Air Force’s version of the Osprey is specifically outfitted for special operations, including upgraded systems such as a terrain-following radar and new communications suites. The Air Force used the airframe to test new systems specifically for their CV-22s, such as new radars and new weapons integration.

However, since this aircraft was a pre-production model originally for the Marines, it was not identical to the new CV-22s assigned to the Air Force.

“It was divergent from the rest of the fleet,” Hoenle said. “U.S. Special Operations command and Air Force Special Operations Command decided to no longer fund that particular airframe.”

That version of the Osprey has engine coverings and specific parts that have to be fabricated when needed because they are no longer in production, Hoenle said.

The 413th FLTS is borrowing an operational CV-22 from Air Force Special Operations Command for testing, while tail number 21 fulfills a last mission at Naval Air Station Patuxent River, Md.

The Air Force flies 35 Ospreys, and expects to field a fleet of 50 by 2016. In fiscal 2013, the fleet flew a mission-capable rate of 61.3 percent.

AF Comm Guy
11-15-2013, 02:59 PM
This isn't a big deal. The space shuttle Enterprise was never meant to go into space. It was a test platform for air worthiness and it now sits at the Intrepid Sea, Air and Space Museum in New York. Putting an early F-22 test platform in a museum for us tax payers to view seems like a good move to me.

On another note, what happened to Robert Dorr? I enjoyed his comments. Was he banned or something?

Juggs
11-15-2013, 06:07 PM
I didn't double check this, but it sounds plausible.

Airframe was overstressed during tests with two external tanks. G-load limiter was exceeded when control was lost after the aircraft passed through the wake of an F-16. Maximum was to be 7.3 Gs but actually climbed to 11.7 Gs. Flight control software was found to be the problem. The aircraft landed safely but never flew again.

Well if this is the case, I sit corrected and it makes sense. I initially assumed it was taken out of service for being old. Much like RFD has been.

imported_KnuckleDragger
11-15-2013, 07:14 PM
CV-22

Thanks denmom

Juggs
11-17-2013, 03:15 PM
Yea I see the confusion. I meant CV-22. Sorry. As the F-22 is the AFs wet dream, it won't see a museum for a long time. Heck, it was making pilots physically ill and killed one but no no no. Can't be the bad airplane.

imported_KnuckleDragger
11-17-2013, 05:05 PM
Yea I see the confusion. I meant CV-22. Sorry. As the F-22 is the AFs wet dream, it won't see a museum for a long time. Heck, it was making pilots physically ill and killed one but no no no. Can't be the bad airplane.


The F-22 has been in a museum since 2007.

Juggs
11-17-2013, 05:07 PM
Ill stop now.