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View Full Version : AFT, "Firing A Gun May Harm Your Lungs"



Slyoldawg
11-13-2013, 12:27 AM
If that is true as the article states, then I should be collecting disability pay for all the guns I fired during 26 years of military service. In combat if you worry about the damage to your lungs from firing a gun is a waste. I think enemy bullets should be a bigger worry. I believe a military newspaper could maybe come up with more relevant articles than that, but that's just me.

TJMAC77SP
11-13-2013, 03:48 AM
If that is true as the article states, then I should be collecting disability pay for all the guns I fired during 26 years of military service. In combat if you worry about the damage to your lungs from firing a gun is a waste. I think enemy bullets should be a bigger worry. I believe a military newspaper could maybe come up with more relevant articles than that, but that's just me.

Thought you were aircrew?

Just curious what guns aircrew fire enough to be hazardous. Gunship maybe?

Slyoldawg
11-13-2013, 06:28 AM
Thought you were aircrew?

Just curious what guns aircrew fire enough to be hazardous. Gunship maybe?

I carried a .38 in a shoulder holster on every flight I was assigned to. We had to fire 300 rounds into a target every six months from various positions, along with the M-16 to stay on flying status. If one round missed we were grounded until we could hit the target with every round fired. I started flying in 1957 until I retired in 1981, so I carried and fired quite a bit during those years. One FE and one LM carried on every flight.

TJMAC77SP
11-13-2013, 12:46 PM
I carried a .38 in a shoulder holster on every flight I was assigned to. We had to fire 300 rounds into a target every six months from various positions, along with the M-16 to stay on flying status. If one round missed we were grounded until we could hit the target with every round fired. I started flying in 1957 until I retired in 1981, so I carried and fired quite a bit during those years. One FE and one LM carried on every flight.

That's more rounds than SP's qualified with in the 70's and 80's. And a higher standard for qualification.

Slyoldawg
11-13-2013, 12:55 PM
That's more rounds than SP's qualified with in the 70's and 80's. And a higher standard for qualification.

While stationed in Spain during the fifties we had a Gun Store as part of the BX. I bought a 9mm there and eventually gave it to my son a few years back. Fired that jewel every chance I got until a few years ago. Do the Air Force still have gun shops at any base you know of?

Slyoldawg
11-13-2013, 12:56 PM
That's more rounds than SP's qualified with in the 70's and 80's. And a higher standard for qualification.

I guess the Air Force wanted to make sure nobody hijacked some of the cargo we carried.

Absinthe Anecdote
11-13-2013, 01:16 PM
I guess the Air Force wanted to make sure nobody hijacked some of the cargo we carried.

You are talking about C-5's or C-141's?

At least by the mid 1980's each C-5 base had SP/SF assigned to accompany missions that went to places without security, I think they call it the Raven program now.

C-5s were classified as priority A resources and had tighter security requirements.

71Fish
11-13-2013, 01:23 PM
While stationed in Spain during the fifties we had a Gun Store as part of the BX. I bought a 9mm there and eventually gave it to my son a few years back. Fired that jewel every chance I got until a few years ago. Do the Air Force still have gun shops at any base you know of?

They opened one up at Hill a few years ago. I thought it was an anomoly but I was told several bases have gun shops. This is the first one I've seen.

71Fish
11-13-2013, 01:25 PM
Thought you were aircrew?

Just curious what guns aircrew fire enough to be hazardous. Gunship maybe?

When I was in Germany during the 90s our C-9 crews were armed.

Slyoldawg
11-13-2013, 01:35 PM
You are talking about C-5's or C-141's?

At least by the mid 1980's each C-5 base had SP/SF assigned to accompany missions that went to places without security, I think they call it the Raven program now.

C-5s were classified as priority A resources and had tighter security requirements.

All the aircraft I flew on, The C-124, C-130, C-141 and C-5 carried two armed crewmembers. I suppose the changes you mention occurred after I retired. We carried replacement "weapons" on the C-141 and I suppose those were more worrisome than the cash payroll we carried to the Sixth Fleet in Italy a time or two

Slyoldawg
11-13-2013, 01:37 PM
They opened one up at Hill a few years ago. I thought it was an anomoly but I was told several bases have gun shops. This is the first one I've seen.

Glad to see "political correctness" hasn't wiped them out as I thought. There were some fantastic deals when I used them last century.

Absinthe Anecdote
11-13-2013, 01:50 PM
I think a lot of the Rod & Gun clubs fizzled out, I never saw an AAFEEs gun shop that I can remember.

Slyoldawg
11-13-2013, 01:55 PM
I think a lot of the Rod & Gun clubs fizzled out, I never saw an AAFEEs gun shop that I can remember.

Thanks for reminding me what they were called. I forgot the name "Rod and Gun Club, or Shop"

DWWSWWD
11-13-2013, 02:10 PM
They just opened one here at my place. I was pleasantly surprised. Always out of ammo and the guys behind the counter don't know shit about guns but still.

Absinthe Anecdote
11-13-2013, 02:14 PM
Thanks for reminding me what they were called. I forgot the name "Rod and Gun Club, or Shop"

Fort Meade used to have a nice one but membership dropped to very low levels and in went under back in the late 90s.

They are using the building as a shelter for battered women now. There is still a little fishing pond out behind it that used to be stocked with bass and I wonder if there are any fish left in it.

TJMAC77SP
11-13-2013, 02:15 PM
You are talking about C-5's or C-141's?

At least by the mid 1980's each C-5 base had SP/SF assigned to accompany missions that went to places without security, I think they call it the Raven program now.

C-5s were classified as priority A resources and had tighter security requirements.

I don't think C-5's were higher than Priority B. Regardless they did have higher security standards.

TJMAC77SP
11-13-2013, 02:18 PM
I am aware of aircrew being armed. I was curious as to what aircrew would have fired weapons often enough to have the exposure classified as hazardous.

Giant Voice
11-13-2013, 02:51 PM
Here's a list from 2010 that has Gun shops in AAFES. I'm sure it has changed but I know Eglin has a nice one.

Eielson AFB
Elmendorf AFB and Fort. Wainwright, Alaska
Fort Rucker, Ala.
Little Rock AFB, Ark.
Eglin AFB, Fla.
Fort Leavenworth and Fort Riley, Kan.
Fort Campbell, Ky.
Barksdale AFB, La.
Whiteman AFB, Mo.
Fort Drum, N.Y.
Offutt AFB, Neb.
Nellis AFB, Nev.
Holloman AFB, N.M.
Minot AFB, N.D.
Fort Knox, KY.
Fort Hood, Tex.
Hill AFB, Utah
Fort Belvoir, Va.

imported_KnuckleDragger
11-13-2013, 03:10 PM
Also add:

Tinker AFB, OK
Wright-Patterson AFB, OH

jmb27
11-13-2013, 03:11 PM
You can add Patrick AFB, FL to that list, they opened up a gun shop last year.

coloringoutsidethelines
11-13-2013, 03:19 PM
I carried a .38 in a shoulder holster on every flight I was assigned to. We had to fire 300 rounds into a target every six months from various positions, along with the M-16 to stay on flying status. If one round missed we were grounded until we could hit the target with every round fired. I started flying in 1957 until I retired in 1981, so I carried and fired quite a bit during those years. One FE and one LM carried on every flight.

I always enjoy your posts, always cool to hear about how things were done back in the day. I think I would have enjoyed it a lot more back then.

Kicker47
11-13-2013, 03:24 PM
They are using the building as a shelter for battered women now.

I prefer breaded women.

:drum

20+Years
11-13-2013, 04:56 PM
Add Ellsworth. Who would have guessed, guns in South Dakota?

Slyoldawg
11-13-2013, 05:36 PM
I always enjoy your posts, always cool to hear about how things were done back in the day. I think I would have enjoyed it a lot more back then.

Thank you for this post. I can only compare what happened to me and what I read here from you guys and ladies who serve today. When I first joined I was put into aircraft maintenance and I was never happy in that field. Too much bullshit went on and I don't recall anyone being happy, or comfortable in that field. When I crosstrained to be a Flight Engineer it felt like I died and went to heaven. I was treated as a human being for the first time and it seemed everyone loved what they were doing. We did not have all the crap you guys have to put up with that I read in this forum. We flew our assigned missions, filled all the scheduled training slots and it was a friendly field to serve in. MAC was the best command to be a flight crew member and because of "Crew Integrity" the crew stayed together. That meant the enlisted stayed in the BOQ with the officers, or off base in hotels if the crew could not be housed in the same facility. Of all the missions I flew I felt that the Air Evac flights were the best because we were doing what we felt was very important for our wounded and sick service mates.
The thing about my military career and the aviation career after retirement that amazes me the most is that I am still in daily contact with crewmembers, both enlisted and officers that I flew with over forty years ago. Many went on to become high ranking later on While I did the same amount of years in a civilian airline career I have not heard from one crewmember that I flew with or taught in any aviation training classes during that entire civilian career. Proves to me that the guys we serve with in the Air Force are really friends for life..