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efmbman
10-14-2013, 11:43 PM
We have some very smart, experienced people here so I was curious if any one has put together an emergency or survival kit. Break glass in the event of disaster / zombie apocalypse.

I have some items in mind, but I would love to hear about what you folks would consider essential.

Stalwart
10-14-2013, 11:52 PM
When things get really bad, the average human can go:

3 minutes without air
3 hours without shelter
3 days without water
3 weeks without food

Have a tent or small portable shelter that accommodates your needs (size of your family.)

Make sure you have water, or if you have a water source a way to purify it that requires no electricity.

Stored food is good short term for 30-90 days (but if you have to go mobile you won't be able to carry that much food on your back. You should maybe brush up on how to get your own food by hunting and/or gathering.

Have a way to defend yourself and your family. I saw a survival show where the community being highlighted didn't allow guns and their 'doomsday plan' required that they remain gun free and they hoped anyone that came across them would see that they were peaceful. Sounds great, almost like a wolf wandering into a sheep herd.

LogDog
10-15-2013, 05:07 AM
We have some very smart, experienced people here so I was curious if any one has put together an emergency or survival kit. Break glass in the event of disaster / zombie apocalypse.

I have some items in mind, but I would love to hear about what you folks would consider essential.
Sounds like what you're talking about is a GO Kit. A GO Kit is a disaster kit containing what you need to survive on your own for 3 days after which time it is assumed that either local/state/federal help will arrive. Here are some suggestion for your GO Kit which will support 1 person for 3 days:

Main Items:
1 gallon of water per day (3 gallons total)
Small First Aid Kit
Whistle
Water proof matches
Small radio (hand-crank preferred)
Map of the local area
3-day supply of non-perishable food (include some comfort food)
Can opener
Dust mask
Shut-off toll for turning off water and gas
Towelettes and/or hand sanitizer
1 set of change of clothes (pants, shirts, underwear, socks, etc.)
Flashlight and extra batteries
Emergency Poncho
Emergency Blanket (those thin, silver colored blankets)
Hat
Leather or work gloves
Sturdy shoes/boots
Extra pair of eye glasses
Any medications you need to take
ZipLock Bags (in cold weather put your feet in them and tape them close to keep them warm and dry)
Duct Tape
FRS Radios (hand-held two-way radios)
Kleenex

Other nice to have items:
Folding shovel
Hammer and small box of nails
50 ft of Parachute cord or rope
Small Tarp
Sleeping Bag
Pup Tent
Sleeping Mat
Cotton Blanket
Survival Book (I recommend Ready or Not by Susan Conniry & Tom Beasley - available on Amazon)

These items seem to be a lot but most of non-food/water items can fit in an A-Bag or duffel bag. My bag is a large Alice Pack I bought at a swap meet and the main items all fit with room to spare. The other items, like the sleeping bag, mat, and tarp are easily carried in another bag.

The water and food would probably have to be in a box or small crate.

Hope this helps you.

Comrade
10-15-2013, 06:06 AM
I'd add a multi-tool, a second way to start a fire, and a three or four quart pot. The pot will allow you to purify water by boiling, and it doesn't take up much space in your pack if you fill it with other items.

Dickie
10-15-2013, 01:05 PM
If all heck breaks loose, have at the very bare minimum: a way to make fire(prefereably two ways), a light(mag-lite, surefire, ect.), a knife (hunting, survival, ect.) and if you can a firearm. Thinking of "the rule of threes" that Stalwart posted is a good start also anything that helps you maintatin 98.6 degrees.

sandsjames
10-15-2013, 02:16 PM
Nope...no kit. I'll take my chances. Well, I do keep some extra stuff (for "medicinal" purposes only) in plastic baggies. Can't have it getting wet. If there's an emergency, I probably won't have a microwave for emergency drying purposes.

Drackore
10-15-2013, 07:18 PM
This is freaky because the past few days I was thinking about things like this and survival guides. Dunno if it was because of the gov't shutdown, the new season of Walking Dead...or a combo of the two. :P I will be following this post closely.

Having been through Katrina and Japan's 9.0 quake/tsunami...I can say water, batteries, a fire starter, and emergency cash is a definite must. Also I chew tobacco, so I keep a one month supply on hand at all times. :D

efmbman
10-15-2013, 09:36 PM
This is freaky because the past few days I was thinking about things like this and survival guides. Dunno if it was because of the gov't shutdown, the new season of Walking Dead...or a combo of the two. :P I will be following this post closely.

Having been through Katrina and Japan's 9.0 quake/tsunami...I can say water, batteries, a fire starter, and emergency cash is a definite must. Also I chew tobacco, so I keep a one month supply on hand at all times. :D

I cant explain it either... but it has been on my mind lately. I was placing items in my Amazon cart and I sheepishly mentioned something about it to my wife. She told me she has been thinking about that sort of thing too.

I am originally from the Texas gulf coast, so I hear you about serious hurricanes. No better opportunity to know if you are prepared than one of those.

USMC0341
10-16-2013, 01:02 AM
I have two large packs ready to go. They contain everything needed to survive in the wilderness, which is where I'll be if shit goes down. Water purification kit, 550 cord, fishing line and hooks, duct tape, 3 knives, e-tool, two fire starting kits (sparkers and that gummy crap that's lights easy), shelter, first aid supplies, binos, field guide to edible plant parts, freeze dried meals, camp stove, two skivvy shirts.

I also have a range bag at the ready, ammo for two 9mm (200rds) and 5.56 (500rds).

efmbman
10-16-2013, 11:59 AM
I have two large packs ready to go. They contain everything needed to survive in the wilderness, which is where I'll be if shit goes down. Water purification kit, 550 cord, fishing line and hooks, duct tape, 3 knives, e-tool, two fire starting kits (sparkers and that gummy crap that's lights easy), shelter, first aid supplies, binos, field guide to edible plant parts, freeze dried meals, camp stove, two skivvy shirts.

I also have a range bag at the ready, ammo for two 9mm (200rds) and 5.56 (500rds).

RE: Shelter. What do you have for a shelter?
RE: First aid. I have had experience with field emergency medicine so I am fairly well-versed in that area. Supplies are a different matter. I know what I can use well, but I am struggling to limit myself to what should be deemed essential. Life, limb, eyesight is what I am trying to focus on. One must be aware that while packing for every possible situation means someone may have to carry all that stuff.

Stalwart
10-16-2013, 12:12 PM
Shelter: I am kind of a camper so ...

-On the fly you can use a bivvy sack/poncho and a poncho liner or a sleeping bag and be good in most foul weather.
-I have a small 1.5 pound one-man tent I take when camping with Scouts (from REI).
-I have a two-man tent for when the wife and I go, probably weighs close to 5 pounds (from REI).
-I have a 4 man tent, kind of bulky so I would not to trek with it (I think LLBean).

(EDIT): read up on how to build a shelter too, from natural and scvangable materials.

First Aid: **I am not a Corpsman** I did get the combat lifesaver cert and without more formal training would advise that at a minimum have the basics to and know how to do the basic lifesaving steps:

-start the breathing (read how to clear the airway, and to perform an expedient tracheotomy.)
-stop the bleeding (you can buy cauterizing powder commercially, be able to sterilize and cover a wound -- you may need to change bandages before you can find help.)
-protect a wound (from dampness mostly, but maybe be ready to make or have a ready-made splint. wrappers from bandages can work too.)
-treat for shock (blanket)

Also, go to the Red Cross and get CPR certified, it is easy, can be done in a few hours.

USMC0341
10-16-2013, 12:31 PM
RE: Shelter. What do you have for a shelter?
RE: First aid. I have had experience with field emergency medicine so I am fairly well-versed in that area. Supplies are a different matter. I know what I can use well, but I am struggling to limit myself to what should be deemed essential. Life, limb, eyesight is what I am trying to focus on. One must be aware that while packing for every possible situation means someone may have to carry all that stuff.

As Stalwart mentioned, i too have a singe light weight tent in my wifes pack, as well as a larger two man tent in mine. I have two for multiple purposes; not only do they serve as shelter, i can use one as a blanket (fill with moss, pine eedles etc...) if needed, since i do not pack sleeping bags, since most are too bulky and don't provide a bang for the buck when space is limited. you can also use one to collect water (rain or water still) if fresh water access is limited.

for first aid, i have various bandages, gauze, two ace wraps, stiptic (sp?) powder (the crap that clots blood), neosporin, small tweezers, cue tips, NSAID's, iodine and some eye stuff my wife got (helps with infections).

i carry the first aid stuff whenever i am out in th ewoods alone, and have actually used the ace wraps and NSAID's on a bad ankle injury out in the field.

71Fish
10-16-2013, 12:41 PM
I will take over my culdesac, kill anyone who desn't follow or whom I have had problems with in the past, and take their rations. Those I didn't take out will build walls around said culdesac and have everyone call me Guvner.

Absinthe Anecdote
10-16-2013, 01:07 PM
I have a relative that is convinced that the book of revelations is playing out right now. She is stockpiling all kinds of stuff and keeps telling me to do the same.

I can't get my mind around her reasoning but I think it has something to do with Glen Beck and the "Left Behind" series of books.

I'm fucked if she is right, because all I have in my apartment to eat right now is a few can of tuna and a sleeve of saltine crackers.

I do have a copy of FM 12-76 and some decent camping gear but I'll probably just join the forces of Satan if all that shit is true, you know, since I'm hell-bound in the first place for not believing in Jesus.

However, I was thinking about starting some type of post-rapture business venture.

If any of you guys that are going up with the rapture crowd want me to deliver any post-rapture messages to your sinner friends, like, "I told you so!" I'll be glad to do it for a small fee, I'll also check on your pets, just PM me the details.

Stalwart
10-16-2013, 01:09 PM
As Stalwart i do not pack sleeping bags

I actually found some that compact down really, REALLY small about 6 x 4 x 4. They are rated down to 5 degrees F, so they are pretty nice.

A bivvy sack will get me an extra few degrees, pine needles between the bivvy and the bag etc ...

USMC0341
10-16-2013, 02:13 PM
I actually found some that compact down really, REALLY small about 6 x 4 x 4. They are rated down to 5 degrees F, so they are pretty nice.

A bivvy sack will get me an extra few degrees, pine needles between the bivvy and the bag etc ...

At that size I would throw one in my bag. I haven't had much luck finding bags with that low of a rating, that still compact. Do you remember who made them by any chance?

UncaRastus
10-16-2013, 02:19 PM
I have cache places stocked with the needed items. The one thing that I keep next to me is my jar of moonshine. My horse, though. I have found it hard to secretly stow bales of hay. Oh, bother.

Any recipes for horse meat?

sandsjames
10-16-2013, 03:40 PM
I have a relative that is convinced that the book of revelations is playing out right now. She is stockpiling all kinds of stuff and keeps telling me to do the same.

I can't get my mind around her reasoning but I think it has something to do with Glen Beck and the "Left Behind" series of books.



You can tell her that (to believers) it has been playing out for the last 2000 years and will continue to do so until the end (not trying to start a religious conversation, just pointing out that IF people believe what the bible says, they SHOULD realize that this stuff has always been going on). Always makes me chuckle when people assume that any trouble is directly related to Revelations.

Stalwart
10-16-2013, 05:49 PM
At that size I would throw one in my bag. I haven't had much luck finding bags with that low of a rating, that still compact. Do you remember who made them by any chance?

Sent you an email.

Semper Fidelis

Absinthe Anecdote
10-17-2013, 12:35 AM
Speaking of survival skills, is anyone a fan of the TV show Dual Survival on Discovery Channel? I enjoy watching it a great deal and like the dynamic between that hippie survival expert and the Recon Marine. I also like Survivor Man, with that little Canadian dude.

I would really like to try primitive fire making just to see if I could it. Is anyone into that kind of thing as a hobbie?

RS6405
10-17-2013, 01:04 AM
Seriously..... A case or two of whiskey/ scotch.

Great way to make new friends.

kyle23457
10-17-2013, 10:13 AM
two crates of copenhagen... four pallets of doritos.. and.. four 55 gallon drums of mountain dew

efmbman
10-17-2013, 11:54 AM
Speaking of survival skills, is anyone a fan of the TV show Dual Survival on Discovery Channel? I enjoy watching it a great deal and like the dynamic between that hippie survival expert and the Recon Marine. I also like Survivor Man, with that little Canadian dude.

I would really like to try primitive fire making just to see if I could it. Is anyone into that kind of thing as a hobbie?

I heard about a show on NAT GEO called Doomsday Preppers. Just downloaded most of the episodes and will give it a look this weekend.

I have gone deep in my backyard (2 football fields in size) and attemped different techniques of starting fires. So far, all have been successful. Patience is paramount. As winter gets closer, I will test again to see how to adust in wet/damp conditions. The magnesium striker is the most effective. I even did the bow - and it worked.

Absinthe Anecdote
10-17-2013, 12:44 PM
I heard about a show on NAT GEO called Doomsday Preppers. Just downloaded most of the episodes and will give it a look this weekend.

I have gone deep in my backyard (2 football fields in size) and attemped different techniques of starting fires. So far, all have been successful. Patience is paramount. As winter gets closer, I will test again to see how to adust in wet/damp conditions. The magnesium striker is the most effective. I even did the bow - and it worked.

That preppers show is interesting but I think most of the people on it are delusional.

The funniest group on that show are the new age hippies that own a de-activated Titan missile silo.

I like Survivor Man with Les Stroud, no crazy politics, just a guy going out in the wilderness with no food and minimal tools and roughing it for a few days. He shows some very useful skills and it makes me want to try a vacation like that.

I have always been fascinated with identifying plants and species of trees. If you are into the outdoors, going for a hike and identifying all the trees you see can be a lot of fun.

Gathering edible plants and catching fish for your dinner sounds like a fun twist to a camping trip to me.

spirit_eyes
10-17-2013, 03:19 PM
Preppers? Up here in the back woods of Maine, we just call it getting ready for winter!

Stalwart
10-17-2013, 03:45 PM
I got into the show with Les Stroud much more than the one with Bear Grylls.

Graylag was in the British Special Forces, so no pansy; the Les Stroud show was in my opinion much more realistic, including highlighting when Stroud just could not make something work.

As far as survival skills, I have been to SERE (both in ME and CA -- once one the Marines and once in the Navy) an to AF SERE220. These courses concentrate much more on the 72 hour window to gets TRAP team in vice long term survival in the wilderness ... More enduring the environment than surviving & thriving in it. There are some civilian primitive living skill courses and schools I can hook you up with.

USMC0341
10-17-2013, 04:11 PM
I got into the show with Les Stroud much more than the one with Bear Grylls.

Graylag was in the British Special Forces, so no pansy; the Les Stroud show was in my opinion much more realistic, including highlighting when Stroud just could not make something work.

As far as survival skills, I have been to SERE (both in ME and CA -- once one the Marines and once in the Navy) an to AF SERE220. These courses concentrate much more on the 72 hour window to gets TRAP team in vice long term survival in the wilderness ... More enduring the environment than surviving & thriving in it. There are some civilian primitive living skill courses and schools I can hook you up with.

The Bridgeport Mountain Survival course is a good course for those who get the opportunity, plus earns you entrance into the e-club (since units onsite are not authorized, at least thats how to use to be).

I think survival training is probably more important than any physical piece of gear. if you are confident in your ability to survive, you can maintain your composure and stay calm in adverse environments, which is a huge advantage in any situation. Knowing what to do and how to do it, alows you to be proactive, rather than scrambling around trying to survive when you are dehydrated, hungry and disoriented.

Stalwart
10-17-2013, 04:44 PM
The Bridgeport Mountain Survival course is a good course for those who get the opportunity, plus earns you entrance into the e-club (since units onsite are not authorized, at least thats how to use to be).

I think survival training is probably more important than any physical piece of gear. if you are confident in your ability to survive, you can maintain your composure and stay calm in adverse environments, which is a huge advantage in any situation. Knowing what to do and how to do it, alows you to be proactive, rather than scrambling around trying to survive when you are dehydrated, hungry and disoriented.

Very true. Winter Mountain Leader was awesome.

I have gone to the Boulder Outdoor Survival School 30 day field course. Basically, you walk into the Utah (there is a Boulder Utah too) high desert with the clothes on your back. Eventually you are allowed your gear which is nothing more than a wool blanket, change of socks, change of undergarments, a knife, a journal and a camera is encouraged. No matches, sleeping bags, tents or other gear. We went from high desert to mountain conditions over the course of the 30-days learning primitive skills on how to build group and individual shelters, make fire, catch and process small game fish and keep it consumable for long periods without refrigeration. It wasn't necessarily the hardest thing I have ever done but I definitely learned some stuff that even my years in the Scouts as a kid or in the Marine Corps I hadn't learned.

LogDog
10-17-2013, 06:25 PM
I will take over my culdesac, kill anyone who desn't follow or whom I have had problems with in the past, and take their rations. Those I didn't take out will build walls around said culdesac and have everyone call me Guvner.
Don't you think your neighbors are thinking the same thing? Only one can be Guvner; who will it be?

Sounds like a good premise for a reality-based program.

LogDog
10-17-2013, 06:30 PM
I heard about a show on NAT GEO called Doomsday Preppers. Just downloaded most of the episodes and will give it a look this weekend.

I have gone deep in my backyard (2 football fields in size) and attemped different techniques of starting fires. So far, all have been successful. Patience is paramount. As winter gets closer, I will test again to see how to adust in wet/damp conditions. The magnesium striker is the most effective. I even did the bow - and it worked.
Since you have plenty of room, you may want to try this tip. I you think there will be a disaster of portions that will disrupt the food distribution system and governmental help won't be available then bury some non-perishable food on your property. This can also include seeds for a garden. To do this, use a large plastic (preferred) or glass jar. After putting your food stuffs in it and screw on the lid, seal the lid to the jar with roofing tar. This will keep out water and air and protect you food for years. Once you've done this, bury the jar about 2-3 feet underground. You can bury a number of jars to ensure you have enough food to outlast the effects of the disaster.

USMC0341
10-17-2013, 07:11 PM
Very true. Winter Mountain Leader was awesome.

I have gone to the Boulder Outdoor Survival School 30 day field course. Basically, you walk into the Utah (there is a Boulder Utah too) high desert with the clothes on your back. Eventually you are allowed your gear which is nothing more than a wool blanket, change of socks, change of undergarments, a knife, a journal and a camera is encouraged. No matches, sleeping bags, tents or other gear. We went from high desert to mountain conditions over the course of the 30-days learning primitive skills on how to build group and individual shelters, make fire, catch and process small game fish and keep it consumable for long periods without refrigeration. It wasn't necessarily the hardest thing I have ever done but I definitely learned some stuff that even my years in the Scouts as a kid or in the Marine Corps I hadn't learned.

i just checked out the BOSS course, sounds pretty damn cool. something i may want to do, just to see how my skills translate. I hope you smoked your fish!

Absinthe Anecdote
10-17-2013, 07:22 PM
I'm pretty sure I could survive a week to 10 days in the Appalachians fairly comfortably with minimal equipment as long as I could make fire. I'm pretty good at locating springs that produce fresh water where giardia isn't a concern. For food I think I would target primarily crayfish and edible plants, I used to catch crayfish and cook a potful on camping trips and it is pretty easy. I would like to practice snaring rabbits and squirrels but I don't even know if the Fish and Game people would hassle you about that. Outside of an Eastern Woodland environment, I would probably be in hurting status as my knowledge of plant and animal life is lacking in other regions.

I view this as a hobby or form of recreation that allows you to test yourself and not from the perspective of prepping for a doomsday scenario. I would like to learn flint knapping and other primitive skills like fire making as a hobby.

On a side note, I found an old flint arrowhead as a kid and sold it to a family friend for twenty bucks, after that I tried and tried to learn flint knapping, but could not come close to replicating an authentic looking arrowhead. Of course, my primary objective there was to rip off people at flea markets by selling my arrowheads to them.

That being said, there is some serious money to be made off the doomsday crowd, and I'm always looking for opportunities to make money off people. Starting up a survival school with an urban twist would probably make money if marketed the right way. Hell, I bet I could charge 50 bucks an hour to dress my students up like junkies and teach them how to avoid attention by acting like a torn-down wino. For their graduation, walk them through Baltimore, and get them to scavenge out of dumpsters for pizza crusts and copper wiring.