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kool-aid
10-04-2013, 09:25 PM
ADKHVAB-E-SHANEH, Afghanistan — Amanda and Jonathan Dwyer split most of their time between two plywood buildings, working in one and sleeping in the other. They eat meals inside a large canvas tent. Their daily routine almost always includes a short run to the nearest concrete bunker, a hazard of living in a place with the moniker Rocket City....

http://www.stripes.com/downrange-together-learning-to-put-marriage-before-duty-1.243789

I guess I am cold-hearted but back when I was in mission was always first. And I definitely wouldn't recommend being deployed with a spouse - could confuse priorities. I guess on the bright side they are desk jockeys and not involved in actual combat where you need to stay focused and alert.

AJBIGJ
10-04-2013, 10:30 PM
I don't personally see harm in it, not sure why this is "news-worthy", but this is Stars & Stripes.

Gonzo432
10-04-2013, 10:53 PM
Slow news day?

Pullinteeth
10-07-2013, 02:37 PM
I don't personally see harm in it, not sure why this is "news-worthy", but this is Stars & Stripes.

Might check out the "Editor's Note" if you are unsure why it was in the paper....

"Editor's Note: This series examines the mental health of U.S. soldiers in Afghanistan and how they cope with war’s internal burden while deployed. Stories explore the work of psychologists, psychiatrists, social workers and chaplains to reduce the combat-related stress of troops; the efforts of senior officers to balance the needs of soldiers with the demands of the U.S. mission; and the fear of asking for help that still exists within the Army. This series is produced with the support of a Rosalynn Carter Fellowship for Mental Health Journalism."

AJBIGJ
10-07-2013, 02:39 PM
Might check out the "Editor's Note" if you are unsure why it was in the paper....

"Editor's Note: This series examines the mental health of U.S. soldiers in Afghanistan and how they cope with war’s internal burden while deployed. Stories explore the work of psychologists, psychiatrists, social workers and chaplains to reduce the combat-related stress of troops; the efforts of senior officers to balance the needs of soldiers with the demands of the U.S. mission; and the fear of asking for help that still exists within the Army. This series is produced with the support of a Rosalynn Carter Fellowship for Mental Health Journalism."

Got that, still agree with the comment that it must be a slow news day!

CORNELIUSSEON
12-08-2014, 05:57 PM
When I was in, none of the services let family serve together in the same unit, especially after the Navy lost 5 Brothers (The Sullivan Brothers) on the same ship during World War Two.

Rusty Jones
12-08-2014, 06:11 PM
Reminds me of when I was a MEPS classifier. Often times, when Little Johnny wants to join the Navy; he'll bring his parents along for the process choosing his job.

Well... in one particular case, Little Johnny was an only child. He dad was there, in all his 300+ lb glory. After we went through the process of picking Little Johnny's job, his asks me to put in his contract annex that, since he's an only child, that he will never be put into harm's way. When I told him that we couldn't do that, they decided (well, Little Johnny's daddy decided) that he wasn't going to join the Navy. We never saw that kid again; so I'm wondering if he ever caved and decided to join another service.

garhkal
12-08-2014, 07:50 PM
I've heard of parents trying to do that before as well. Makes you wonder where they get it into their heads, that they feel they can dictate something like that to the recruiters from.