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AlexCross
09-20-2013, 12:21 PM
My oldest two kids share a birthday...one year apart. Both are allergic to milk, both are in the gifted program at school, both wore glasses and now contacts, they are the exact same height and weight, both are extremely competitive but not with each other, both love to read, and both get carsick.

Giant Voice
09-20-2013, 12:28 PM
Every other generation has a genetic defect in the right thumb making it a stubby.

giggawatt
09-20-2013, 06:39 PM
My father was a relentlessly self-improving boulangerie owner from Belgium with low grade narcolepsy and a penchant for buggery. My mother was a fifteen year old French prostitute named Chloe with webbed feet. My father would womanize, he would drink. He would make outrageous claims like he invented the question mark. Sometimes he would accuse chestnuts of being lazy. The sort of general malaise that only the genius possess and the insane lament.

Rizzo77
09-20-2013, 06:49 PM
I have a squirrel in my back yard that throws his detritus (acorn shells) onto the ground. I saw him throwing the shells one day; he saw me watching him, and I swear that he gave me the finger before he ran away.

sandsjames
09-20-2013, 07:05 PM
My Mom was 18 and my Dad was 17 when they got married. My dad's dad was a minister and didn't want them to get married, so my mom got pregnant. At that point, my dad's dad said they HAD to get married. They've now been married 46 years.

Note: It took us several years to realize that there was only 6 months between my parents' anniversary and my sister's birthday.

AlexCross
09-20-2013, 07:16 PM
My Mom was 18 and my Dad was 17 when they got married. My dad's dad was a minister and didn't want them to get married, so my mom got pregnant. At that point, my dad's dad said they HAD to get married. They've now been married 46 years.

Note: It took us several years to realize that there was only 6 months between my parents' anniversary and my sister's birthday.

Wow. 46 years? That is awesome. Congrats to them.

CYBERFX1024
09-20-2013, 07:24 PM
My father is turning 70 this year while my mom turned 55 this year. Talk about a age difference.

AlexCross
09-20-2013, 07:30 PM
My father is turning 70 this year while my mom turned 55 this year. Talk about a age difference.

I have some good friends with a 15 year age difference. He is 47 and she is 32. They just had their third kid last week.

Calmo70
09-20-2013, 07:45 PM
My grandfather was in the Marines and in France/Belgium/Germany durin WWI. He was gassed, wounded, and a POW for about four months. When he came back he was declared as "Shell Shocked' as they called it back then and was placed under guardianship of my great-grandfather for five years after the war. He finally was declared "normal" and released from guardianship. Anyway, his commanding general in Europe that had put him into the situations that he endured was Marine Major General John LeJeune (yes, the same guy Camp LeJeune is named after). My grandfather still respected General LeJeune so much he named his first son (my father) after the General - John LeJeune. I'm a Jr (with the same name) and my son is a III (with the same name).

AlexCross
09-20-2013, 08:00 PM
Hmmm Tak Welsh Jr, Tak Schwartz Jr, Tak McPeak Jr...
Nah, not working...

Nope not here either. Welsh Cross...not working. All of the kids have family names. Oldest is after her grandmother, middle boy is after an uncle and his dad, and youngest is after an aunt and a family middle name. All also have names from the Bible. None of their names can be shortened. Only one we really debated was the boy. I really wanted Luke. Oh well. Not gonna be a number 4 so no Luke.

LogDog
09-20-2013, 09:42 PM
My dad was a Navy fighter pilot in WWII in the South Pacific. Early in the war, he sank a Japanese destroyer and later sent on a War Bond tour throughout the U.S. His actions are detailed in a couple of books about WWII. He was shot down once and drifted to an island in his one-man life raft. He didn't know if it was a Japanese held or Allied held island so he stripped down to his underwear and carried his dog tags in his hand. If it was a Japanese held island he was going to drop his dog tags in the water and start speaking German (which he grew up with). Fortunately, it was an Allied held island. He survived 2 mid-air collisions, neither was his fault, with his fellow pilots on 2 different occasions. He later switched from being a fighter pilot and became one of the earliest Navy helicopter pilots.

My great grandfather on my mother's side is one of the early pioneers in Wyoming and is written up in their history books.

retiredAFcivvy
09-20-2013, 09:57 PM
My grandfather was in the Civil War, my dad was in WW1, there was 26 years difference in my mom and dad's ages.

Gonzo432
09-20-2013, 10:56 PM
My great-great grandfather shot and killed his neighbor. He then turned himself in to the county sheriff and was later acquitted on grounds of self-defense. It was an argument over a property line and the neighbor's gun caught on his coat tail. Both families were and still are neighbors and close friends. I remember my grandma saying, "If grandpa hadn't shot him, he'd have probably been shot by someone in his own family." In 1892, "he needed killin" might have been a viable defense.

Jumper5
09-21-2013, 12:26 AM
My sister and I have the same birthday but are six years apart on the year.

RS6405
09-21-2013, 12:51 AM
My dad grew up on the west coast; my mom the east coast, and they met in Germany. My twin bro now lives in Berlin.

Also my mom is a twin, and on my father's side, my brother and I are number 13 of 17 sets of twins from my G-G-G-G (+/-) grandfather who was born in 1793.

Chief_KO
09-21-2013, 02:58 AM
My Dad was a 27 year old draftee (already married w/ 1 year old daughter) in 1943. 20/20 vision he was a sharpshooter in the 29th Infantry. After basic and other training they were put on the Queen Mary to sail to their overseas duty. One day at sea they were ordered to throw all their lightweight tropical uniforms overboard and were issued heavy woolens. It was then they figured out their were heading to Europe rather than the South Pacific. After more training in England, he landed on Omaha Beach on D-Day. One of the last off his landing craft, he stepped off and promptly sank with water over his head (he never learned to swim). He walked out of the water. Later injured near Saint Lo, France (shrapnel), he was given the Last Rights (even though not Catholic). Sent back to England to recover. Recovered to rejoin his unit in time for the Battle of the Bulge and liberation of one of the concentration camps. His brother (single at the time) and my Dad met by chance in France when my Dad returned.
After my Dad died at the age of 78, we were going through all his papers, etc. with my Mom, sister, & brother (I got his military stuff). When I looked at his DD-214 it showed in addition to infantryman, he was a scout & combat engineer (the last two things none of us knew).
Politically, I only remember him making one comment; that Harry Truman saved his life cause he didn't think he would have survived fighting in Japan. Militarily, he advised me not to join the Army (tell me it was the a$$hole of the universe).
He died before I got married (our Son's middle name is my Dad's) and my Mom passed away a week before Chief results came out. I miss them every day.

TREYSLEDGE
09-23-2013, 11:16 AM
Every man in my family (and one woman) served in the military since WWII. All the services are covered: My paternal grandfather was career Air Corps then Air Force and was one of the first SMSgts when the new rank was created. My maternal grandfather was Army and served in the Aleutian Islands during WWII. My paternal grandfather's brother was a pilot in the Marines during WWII and died in an aircraft accident. My father and his brother were Army in Vietnam, but only my dad made it a career. No male uncles on my mom's side. My cousin was in the Navy before she was kicked out. My older brother was in the Army before was kicked out (bad trend). My little brother thought about joining the Army, but he changed his mind so he's the first not to serve in almost 70 years. He probably would have been kicked out anyway (major problem with authority).

Other stuff: My oldest son was born on my anniversary and my twins were born on my Birthday. My father, me and my oldest son were all born in Germany due to being stationed there. My son has the unofficial record from the now closed Bitburg Hostipal for being the biggest baby born (for at least the 15 years prior per the staff). He was 11lbs-5oz and 24 in long. Not to be out done the twins were 7-12 and 7-8 (15 lbs total).

Shaken1976
09-23-2013, 04:04 PM
My grandfather on my dad's side was quite a bit older than my grandmother. He was in the Army Air Corps back in the day. He was an Enlisted Pilot. He also worked for/with William C. Ocker who is the Father of Blind Flight. Interestingly enough...my job is Airfield Systems which includes NavAids. During ALS I wrote one of my papers on Enlisted Pilots and interviewed my grandfather. He had pictures of him and his aircraft, pictures of several other enlisted pilots, and several of his awards and decorations. I loved sitting there listening to his stories. He is a big part of why I chose the Air Force along with a neighbor of mine.

LogDog
09-23-2013, 10:06 PM
Every man in my family (and one woman) served in the military since WWII. All the services are covered: My paternal grandfather was career Air Corps then Air Force and was one of the first SMSgts when the new rank was created. My maternal grandfather was Army and served in the Aleutian Islands during WWII. My paternal grandfather's brother was a pilot in the Marines during WWII and died in an aircraft accident. My father and his brother were Army in Vietnam, but only my dad made it a career. No male uncles on my mom's side. My cousin was in the Navy before she was kicked out. My older brother was in the Army before was kicked out (bad trend). My little brother thought about joining the Army, but he changed his mind so he's the first not to serve in almost 70 years. He probably would have been kicked out anyway (major problem with authority).

Other stuff: My oldest son was born on my anniversary and my twins were born on my Birthday. My father, me and my oldest son were all born in Germany due to being stationed there. My son has the unofficial record from the now closed Bitburg Hostipal for being the biggest baby born (for at least the 15 years prior per the staff). He was 11lbs-5oz and 24 in long. Not to be out done the twins were 7-12 and 7-8 (15 lbs total).
I believe the Bitburg hospital is still open. When they closed Bitburg the hospital, base housing, and the exchange/commissary there remained open but under Spangdahlem.

TREYSLEDGE
09-24-2013, 12:26 PM
I believe the Bitburg hospital is still open. When they closed Bitburg the hospital, base housing, and the exchange/commissary there remained open but under Spangdahlem.

Yes, when Bitburg AB closed the new Bitburg Annex fell under Spangdahlem and had the hospital and the other stuff you mention. I was there from 2003-2006 and in late 2006 or early 2007 they closed the hospital. A friend of mine had the last baby born at Bitburg. The housing, BX, commissary and schools are still open.

Absinthe Anecdote
09-24-2013, 02:31 PM
My grandfather was a drunken scoundrel and a small time con artist who travelled the depression era Southern States running tent-revivals. He had several women who where pregnant at the same time in this one small town and was forced to marry one of them by an angry mob. He picked my grandmother and gave up the tent revival gig and started drinking full time and went on to have seven children with her.

He would vanish for months at a time and leave my grandmother with little or no money so my dad and his brothers would kill pigeons with sling shots for dinner on a routine basis. They eventually moved into one of the first housing projects in my home state and described their childhood as happy. I never understood why my dad and his brothers would speak so fondly of coming up poor with a drunken father would beat their mother and abandon them for months only to return and repeat the process.

Kicker47
09-24-2013, 02:56 PM
My great-grandfather was shot in the back by Buford Tannen over the matter of $80...

AlexCross
09-24-2013, 05:40 PM
My sister once dated a guy that had 6 toes on each foot.

I think that would freak me out.

LogDog
09-24-2013, 05:53 PM
Yes, when Bitburg AB closed the new Bitburg Annex fell under Spangdahlem and had the hospital and the other stuff you mention. I was there from 2003-2006 and in late 2006 or early 2007 they closed the hospital. A friend of mine had the last baby born at Bitburg. The housing, BX, commissary and schools are still open.
I've been retired for 10 years and live in the San Diego (Navy town) area so I don't get a lot of info on AF bases. I was at Bitburg from 1993 -1994. About 2 months after I arrived they announced the draw down/closure of Bitburg. I was in the medical group and we shipped our WRM programs to other bases as part of the draw down. In fact, the last official flight off Bitburg, as we were told, took our Air Transportable Hospital back to the States.

I was suppose to be there for a 2-year tour but the draw down/closure curtailed the assignment and after 14 months I PCS'd to RAF Lakenheath for a 3-year tour, which BTW, turned out to be one of my best assignments ever.

BENDER56
09-24-2013, 06:43 PM
I was born in the Portsmouth Naval Hospital when my dad was stationed at Pease AFB, NH. For my entire life I was told I was born in New Hampshire, and had no reason not to believe that until I had to get a certified copy of my birth certificate for a passport and discovered that the hospital isn't in Portsmouth NH, it's in Kittery Maine. When I applied for a TS/SCI a few years ago I had to include a note explaining why the wrong state was listed as my state of birth in most of my AF records.

TREYSLEDGE
09-25-2013, 06:47 AM
I've been retired for 10 years and live in the San Diego (Navy town) area so I don't get a lot of info on AF bases. I was at Bitburg from 1993 -1994. About 2 months after I arrived they announced the draw down/closure of Bitburg. I was in the medical group and we shipped our WRM programs to other bases as part of the draw down. In fact, the last official flight off Bitburg, as we were told, took our Air Transportable Hospital back to the States.

I was suppose to be there for a 2-year tour but the draw down/closure curtailed the assignment and after 14 months I PCS'd to RAF Lakenheath for a 3-year tour, which BTW, turned out to be one of my best assignments ever.

No worries, it wasn't big news when the hospital closed. I hope you enjoyed you short time at Bitburg, I had a great time living there. I'm glad you enjoyed Lakenheath, I'm actually trying to get there next summer.

AlexCross
09-25-2013, 01:29 PM
I had a friend in High School who had only 3 fingers on one had. The other hand had a full 5.

I ran into him several years later at the mall, he was with his pregnant wife. During the conversation, I asked them if they were hoping for a boy or girl.

He replied, "As long as it has 8 fingers and 10 toes, we'll be happy."

I had a good friend that only had one arm. I met him in the middle of winter and he always had a hoodie on. I didn't find out until the first time I saw him in a short sleeve shirt that he only had one arm.

LogDog
09-25-2013, 06:01 PM
No worries, it wasn't big news when the hospital closed. I hope you enjoyed you short time at Bitburg, I had a great time living there. I'm glad you enjoyed Lakenheath, I'm actually trying to get there next summer.
I enjoyed the area but the OIC, a Lt., I worked for, a former SSgt in the same career field, was a pain in the ass. He micromanaged most people's work and although I was the senior MSgt in the flight when I arrived he put his boy, a junior MSgt, in charge of the flight. I tried to work with the Lt. but he made it hard on me so I simply did my job the correct way and held him to the same standards as everyone else in the career field. I had to sit him down and explain that one of the orders he gave a SSgt was not only illegal but constituted fraud and that if he didn't rescind the order I would have a discussion with the Group Commander. He backed down and resented me from then on. I was fortunate in that I had a good reputation and relationship with the hospital Group Commander and Administrator and they didn't think much of the Lt.. We had a SMSgt in Admin PCS and they needed someone to fill his slot until a new SMSgt arrived. The Group Commander and hospital Administrator offered me the job and I took it until I PCS'd. When the Lt. submitted my EPR he gave me an overall "3" rating and he was chewed out together by both the Commander and Administrator for his obvious retaliation against me. They told him they'd sign-off on nothing less than a "5" rating. The Lt. wrote the "5" EPR and the Commander endorsed it.

As for RAF Lakenheath, I worked for the senior Chief in our career field, whom I had meet about 8 years earlier at another assignment in England, and he was the best supervisor/Flight Superintendent I ever worked for. I learned a lot about leadership from observing him which I applied at my final two assignments.