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Pullinteeth
09-12-2013, 03:22 PM
Colorado had a special recall election after their state legislature passed some severe gun contol legislation and the two pro-gun contol legislators were tossed. Quote of the day? State Sen. Angela Giron said she was proud of her vote because "This is not the wrong business to be fearful about doing the right thing."

http://politicalticker.blogs.cnn.com/2013/09/11/pro-gun-control-democrats-ousted-in-colorado-recall/?hpt=hp_t3

efmbman
09-12-2013, 05:37 PM
I find it kind of distasteful that special interest groups from across the country are allowed to get so involved in a local race...not sure what to do about it though.

If you think that's distasteful, consider that some states (22) still elect their supreme court judges. The state supreme court is usually the last stop prior to the US Supreme Court. If that is not a breeding ground for special interests I don't know what is.

Quixotic
09-12-2013, 07:28 PM
Special Interests: As a side note, I remember hearing an old chief talking with a group of Airmen one time and ranting about the evils of special interest groups and how they were destroying the country, etc....a little while later he starts extoling the virtures of AFSA and how important it is for everyone to join and support.

Uh, Chief? You do know that AFSA is a special interest group, right?

IOW, special interest groups are fine as long as it's your interests that are special.

BINGO!

I've had several political discussions over the years in which the evils of special interest groups were the topic. In one particular conversation, the two harshest critics also happened to be members of the NRA.

It was fun pointing that out. LOL

imported_WILDJOKER5
09-12-2013, 08:26 PM
Kind of nice to see democracy work...gives me hope.

The only part the kinda bugs me about this story is :


National groups on both sides of the gun rights debate jumped into the race, pouring money into a state level contest that normally would generate few headlines beyond Colorado's borders. But gun rights activists and gun control supporters nationwide saw the election as a chance to score an electoral victory for their respective movements.


I find it kind of distasteful that special interest groups from across the country are allowed to get so involved in a local race...not sure what to do about it though.

Do you know who gave money first? I thought it was weird how Bloomberg gave a million to support the gun ban dems.

TJMAC77SP
09-12-2013, 08:31 PM
BINGO!

I've had several political discussions over the years in which the evils of special interest groups were the topic. In one particular conversation, the two harshest critics also happened to be members of the NRA.

It was fun pointing that out. LOL

It isn’t the existence of special interest groups that is the problem. It is their ability to financially influence elected officials.

If they would simply apply the current rules the DoD Acquisition Force has to abide by to every elected and appointed government official of all three branches there would never be another problem (except in those cases where some break the law). There would never be a junket or ‘fact finding trip’ to the world’s greatest golf courses. Special interest groups could still get in front of elected officials and present their agendas; they just couldn’t do it over a lunch or dinner costing thousands of dollars.

Imagine that….there is already an existing set of rules which would in essence, solve the problem of election reform.

imported_WILDJOKER5
09-16-2013, 03:11 PM
Yeah, yeah...we know...no matter what the lefties are bad...if both are bad, the lefties are worse.

Well, it was amazing that you brought it up that BOTH sides did it. Although bloomberg out donated 7 to 1 of the NRA himself, most of the complaining from the lefties is about the big bad NRA donations. Oh, and voter suppression. Just figure if we are going to put out the blame game, might not want to put both on the same level when it was clearly screwed one way over the other.

imported_WILDJOKER5
09-16-2013, 03:13 PM
Brilliant.

Yep...it's the money in politics that is the core of the problem...of course, no way with any influence wants to eliminate the money because that's how they get their influence.

Still waiting to see if social media can change the election paradigm someday.Again, we want to blame money, yet the anti guns corner gave far more than the pro gun corner, and the anti gun side lost. Guess it wouldnt have been so close without Bloombergs influence then huh?

CYBERFX1024
09-16-2013, 04:23 PM
Well, it was amazing that you brought it up that BOTH sides did it. Although bloomberg out donated 7 to 1 of the NRA himself, most of the complaining from the lefties is about the big bad NRA donations. Oh, and voter suppression. Just figure if we are going to put out the blame game, might not want to put both on the same level when it was clearly screwed one way over the other.


Yeah I saw a interview that CNN did with one of failed legislators. She kept referring that there was voter suppression because certain people couldn't mail in their ballots. That's all she kept talking about even though the CNN commentator was trying to get her on new topics such as the Bloomberg money.

Pullinteeth
09-16-2013, 05:22 PM
Yep...she is a real winner. She is the one that also said she was proud of her "pro-gun control" vote because the CO Congress "is not the wrong business to be fearful about doing the right thing."

imported_WILDJOKER5
09-16-2013, 07:37 PM
Yeah I saw a interview that CNN did with one of failed legislators. She kept referring that there was voter suppression because certain people couldn't mail in their ballots. That's all she kept talking about even though the CNN commentator was trying to get her on new topics such as the Bloomberg money.

In the beginning of the recall she was tweeting positives about how far a head she was. Until the workers got out of work did she start to lose. I find it amazing that she claims voter suppression in a district that was vastly "blue" but still voted her out by 12% or so.

Okie
09-17-2013, 07:08 AM
I don't recall saying anything about any sides...I just quoted the article.



I didn't blame either side...I was lamenting the idea of national groups getting too involved in local elections and turning them into one-issue referendums.

First, I wouldn't say this was "about" gun control, despite what you're being told. It was about arrogant Senators who wouldn't listen to the people. Gun control was merely the catalyst. There were others (specifically the pro-weed crowd) that had similar issues with Morse. Gun rights guys would do well to remember they had help in this, and Republicans would do well to remember that this wasn't anti-Democrat or pro-Republican.

Having said that, I agree with your premise. I'm not saying one side is worse than the other, but I will say who started it this time.

The summary: Gun control legislation written by Mayor Bloomberg's staff was introducted in CO. Gov Hickenlooper was on the phone with Bloomberg at least twice with Mayor Bloomberg working up to the legislation's passge. CO has a history of allowing exhaustive debate on issues, but that didn't happen here. The legislation was ramrodded through. It was funny how gun control advocates (some from out-of-state and on Bloomberg's payroll) got to speak and normal pro-gun CO citizens (some of whom had been waiting 10 or more hours) did not. Morse told Senators to ignore their constituents. Giron told voters it was "her" townhall, and she would not talk about gun bills, even though that's what the people wanted to discuss.

Again, this was about political arrogance.

AJBIGJ
09-18-2013, 03:53 AM
I think this most seriously alludes to the sad state of politics in which we've become deeply entrenched. I don't know why we get so fixated on this whole "Red State/Blue State" conundrum, as even California and Texas can have their "shades of purple" when observed comprehensively. The day we begin to approach these discussions as individuals, without a buttload of force-fed rhetoric that we use to reassure ourselves that we are taking a "popular" position, will be a day we begin to detach ourselves from the partisanship which makes us collectively so stagnant and resilient in our political positions and able to address each other as individuals with a uniquely individual opinion on the issue.