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Chief_KO
09-01-2013, 11:06 PM
The AF has a pretty rich and well documented enlisted heritage and history...up to the Vietnam War. Here we sit, 23 years after Desert Storm, 12+ years of direct action in Afghanistan & Iraq yet very little documented on the outstanding achievements of USAF enlisted personnel. I teach this subject at NCO & SNCO professional development and would love to have more than just the 4 things I've been able to find on official AF sites, etc.
Does anyone have any stories they can share? Date/location/names (if possible) please. Especially stories from the non-traditional AF "warriors"...no slight against aircrew, pararescue, combat controller, etc. but it would be really great to share stories on maintainers, medics, loggies, etc.
Thanks in advance!

BRUWIN
09-01-2013, 11:21 PM
My old flightline buddy (SSgt Larry Chrismon) could walk over hot bonfire coals with no shoes. He would do it all night if you kept asking him. He was from North Carolina and grew up without shoes so he has calluses on his feet about an inch thick.

Hope this helps.

Gonzo432
09-01-2013, 11:21 PM
The AF has a pretty rich and well documented enlisted heritage and history...up to the Vietnam War. Here we sit, 23 years after Desert Storm, 12+ years of direct action in Afghanistan & Iraq yet very little documented on the outstanding achievements of USAF enlisted personnel. I teach this subject at NCO & SNCO professional development and would love to have more than just the 4 things I've been able to find on official AF sites, etc.
Does anyone have any stories they can share? Date/location/names (if possible) please. Especially stories from the non-traditional AF "warriors"...no slight against aircrew, pararescue, combat controller, etc. but it would be really great to share stories on maintainers, medics, loggies, etc.
Thanks in advance!

PM on the way.

sandsjames
09-01-2013, 11:34 PM
My old flightline buddy (SSgt Larry Chrismon) could walk over hot bonfire coals with no shoes. He would do it all night if you kept asking him. He was from North Carolina and grew up without shoes so he has calluses on his feet about an inch thick.

Hope this helps.

You're so helpful...never forgetting where you came from.

Absinthe Anecdote
09-01-2013, 11:37 PM
My old flightline buddy (SSgt Larry Chrismon) could walk over hot bonfire coals with no shoes. He would do it all night if you kept asking him. He was from North Carolina and grew up without shoes so he has calluses on his feet about an inch thick.

Hope this helps.

That would be a pretty good story for a professional development course because you could say how with a little bit of confidence and some thick calluses you can accomplish things like walking over hot coals.

I know a SrA from my barracks days that was so resourceful that he used an old mayonnaise jar as a spittoon. He was afraid of using old soda cans because he didn't want to confuse his spittoon with his drink and that's why he used a mayonnaise jar.

That kind of resourcefulness and ingenuity is what makes the Air Force great.

BRUWIN
09-02-2013, 12:09 AM
That would be a pretty good story for a professional development course because you could say how with a little bit of confidence and some thick calluses you can accomplish things like walking over hot coals.

I know a SrA from my barracks days that was so resourceful that he used an old mayonnaise jar as a spittoon. He was afraid of using old soda cans because he didn't want to confuse his spittoon with his drink and that's why he used a mayonnaise jar.

That kind of resourcefulness and ingenuity is what makes the Air Force great.

Back in the days when the AF was twice the size it is now we did have a lot more characters. The AF was a lot less picky and sometimes what showed up at the unit doorstep gave me stories I could tell for life. The AF of today is less diverse in characters. All these young folks tend to act and think the same...it's boring.

imnohero
09-02-2013, 12:31 AM
I've given your request some thought, but every idea I think of, I run up against this little voice that says, "yeah, but that was their job." Which leads me to wonder if we have just gotten so used to exceptional performance day to day, that is why we don't have any good enlisted stories.

Take for instance, the airlift at the start of Desert Storm. TALCE units went into previously unused airfeilds, set up shop with Port and MX and, along with the big airports like Dahran, broke the airlift ton-mile record set during the Berlin airlift. 80-90% of those folks on the ground were enlisted, right? Collectively they accomplished a huge, great, historical thing. But the individual stories have been lost of exactly what it took to pull it off.

BadBender
09-02-2013, 06:16 AM
I don’t know if this fits here but here goes. About 13+ years ago I was an A1C, stationed at Maxwell AFB. The brand new Enlisted Heritage Museum was opened and I went enjoy it’s splendor and awe. A short time after that it was announced John Levitow was to be a guest speaker there and the call went out to the base and squadrons to provide Airmen to listen to him speak. I was chosen to represent my unit. There we sat, Airmen from all squadrons along a dark stained wooden table. The kind of table you’d expect at some high level meeting. In walked Mr. Levitow and we all stood at attention. He told us to be seated and said something along the lines of “ have you ever seen this?”. He chucked his Medal of Honor down the table to the Airman at the end. I had never before then seen an actual Medal Of Honor and judging from the other Airman’s response neither had they. He told is story, that he was simply an Airman doing his duty that day. It has stuck with me every day since.

FLAPS, USAF (ret)
09-02-2013, 03:47 PM
Back in the day I was never a smartphone zombie. Phone time or face time, that's it. Today I still do not own a smartphone and it kills me to see a room full of idle Airmen all staring into their smartphones instead of talking to each other. When out and about I try to live in the "here and now." Seems most people these days live in the "somewhere else and now."

Times have changed...

Johca
09-02-2013, 05:47 PM
"yeah, but that was their job."Might have been, but if they were awarded the Bronze Star they supposedly did a bit exceptional more. Have these people send in the narrative. The narrative is either BS or discloses examples of what is desired to be told.

Max Power
09-02-2013, 08:13 PM
The AF has a pretty rich and well documented enlisted heritage and history...up to the Vietnam War. Here we sit, 23 years after Desert Storm, 12+ years of direct action in Afghanistan & Iraq yet very little documented on the outstanding achievements of USAF enlisted personnel. I teach this subject at NCO & SNCO professional development and would love to have more than just the 4 things I've been able to find on official AF sites, etc.
Does anyone have any stories they can share? Date/location/names (if possible) please. Especially stories from the non-traditional AF "warriors"...no slight against aircrew, pararescue, combat controller, etc. but it would be really great to share stories on maintainers, medics, loggies, etc.
Thanks in advance!

Here you go.

http://www.dyess.af.mil/news/story.asp?id=123296425
http://www.militaryphotos.net/forums/showthread.php?210746-USAF-Finance-NCO-awarded-Bronze-Star-Medal

BRUWIN
09-02-2013, 08:59 PM
I don’t know if this fits here but here goes. About 13+ years ago I was an A1C, stationed at Maxwell AFB. The brand new Enlisted Heritage Museum was opened and I went enjoy it’s splendor and awe. A short time after that it was announced John Levitow was to be a guest speaker there and the call went out to the base and squadrons to provide Airmen to listen to him speak. I was chosen to represent my unit. There we sat, Airmen from all squadrons along a dark stained wooden table. The kind of table you’d expect at some high level meeting. In walked Mr. Levitow and we all stood at attention. He told us to be seated and said something along the lines of “ have you ever seen this?”. He chucked his Medal of Honor down the table to the Airman at the end. I had never before then seen an actual Medal Of Honor and judging from the other Airman’s response neither had they. He told is story, that he was simply an Airman doing his duty that day. It has stuck with me every day since.

John Levitow was somebody that didn't enjoy the spotlight and from what I've been told was always very hesitant to even talk about it. He hated talking to large groups and really didn't do it a whole lot. The times he did was out of a sense of obligation. He was just very humble. At least that's what I have been told.

OtisRNeedleman
09-02-2013, 09:10 PM
Back in the day I was never a smartphone zombie. Phone time or face time, that's it. Today I still do not own a smartphone and it kills me to see a room full of idle Airmen all staring into their smartphones instead of talking to each other. When out and about I try to live in the "here and now." Seems most people these days live in the "somewhere else and now."

Times have changed...

Same here. I don't even have a cell phone. If I ever get another job guess I'd need to get a cell phone. But I agree with you, too many people hooked on that electronic crack called a smartphone.

Bunch
09-03-2013, 04:04 AM
The AF has a pretty rich and well documented enlisted heritage and history...up to the Vietnam War. Here we sit, 23 years after Desert Storm, 12+ years of direct action in Afghanistan & Iraq yet very little documented on the outstanding achievements of USAF enlisted personnel. I teach this subject at NCO & SNCO professional development and would love to have more than just the 4 things I've been able to find on official AF sites, etc.
Does anyone have any stories they can share? Date/location/names (if possible) please. Especially stories from the non-traditional AF "warriors"...no slight against aircrew, pararescue, combat controller, etc. but it would be really great to share stories on maintainers, medics, loggies, etc.
Thanks in advance!

Please let us know how this project of yours ends up. I will really like to see what are you able to find.

TJMAC77SP
09-03-2013, 11:23 AM
John Levitow was somebody that didn't enjoy the spotlight and from what I've been told was always very hesitant to even talk about it. He hated talking to large groups and really didn't do it a whole lot. The times he did was out of a sense of obligation. He was just very humble. At least that's what I have been told.

I never had a chance to meet John Levitow but heard Chief Airey said that very same thing about him many times. I think he truly believed he was just doing his job that night.