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Shaken1976
08-12-2013, 12:30 PM
My biggest pet peeve as a supervisor is people being late. It really gets under my skin. Then the excuses...there was a line at the gate, traffic, or whatever.

Also lying. Own it if you did something wrong.



As a troop...my supervisor throwing me under the bus for something they told me to do. Crappy feedback. Not having a backbone. I had one who refused to ever let anyone go early because the CC might get mad.

imnohero
08-12-2013, 12:40 PM
I hear you on the being late thing. Though in my case, i wouldn't call it a pet peeve so much as a moral imperative. Being on time, especially in the military, is important. Not showing up on time is disrespectful. But maybe, I'm just a nut about it.

Pet Peeve, for me, was when people didn't return emails or phone calls. I never was one to "spam forward" email, so when I did send one, it was usual something I needed an answer on. In this same category, was the trend before I retired of support service (MPF, Finance, primarily) not answering a customer service phone line. Why bother to have it then?

euripedes
08-12-2013, 12:59 PM
Being late and showing up with food is one that gets me going as a sup.
Another one is troops not having a clock and using their phone as an alarm clock. So when they don't charge the phone...no alarm.

As a troop i didn't have many. Wasn't much back and forth discussion when i was an airman. A lot of one way conversations.

Absinthe Anecdote
08-12-2013, 01:20 PM
People who have shoddy physical fitness regimens and get crappy scores on the PT test, then complain about the test being unfair.

Also, people who make fun of bake sale divas and PT Gods and claim they are wizards of their AFSCs while they are only mediocre.

Oh, and let's not forget the cynical smoke pit lawyer.

That's about it except for shitty EPR writers and clock watchers and deployment dodgers and appointment moguls and email spammers and break room squatters and constant spouse phone talkers and ABUs shouldn't be ironed preachers...hmmn, that's about it... Except for people who don't know how to use that conveyer belt toaster at the chow hall.

That's pretty much it...

imported_AFKILO7
08-12-2013, 01:22 PM
I distinctly remember the conversation during ALS about being late. So many of the other SrA's were like, "just have your people bring in Taco's or doughnuts." I had just left Minot and if you were late and a nuclear missile movement was put on hold because of you...Article 15. Everyone was amazed.


My biggest pet peeve would have to be ass kissing. I believe that if you work your ass off, you will be fine. No need to kiss ass.

Shaken1976
08-12-2013, 01:29 PM
People who have shoddy physical fitness regimens and get crappy scores on the PT test, then complain about the test being unfair.

Also, people who make fun of bake sale divas and PT Gods and claim they are wizards of their AFSCs while they are only mediocre.

Oh, and let's not forget the cynical smoke pit lawyer.

That's about it except for shitty EPR writers and clock watchers and deployment dodgers and appointment moguls and email spammers and break room squatters and constant spouse phone talkers and ABUs shouldn't be ironed preachers...hmmn, that's about it... Except for people who don't know how to use that conveyer belt toaster at the chow hall.

That's pretty much it...

The smoke pit lawyer...and the person who takes their word for gospel.

SrA Snuffy said you can't write me up the first time I do something wrong.

js7799
08-12-2013, 01:34 PM
Biggest pet peeve as a supervisor/NCO: people thinking they can pull rank, or be an asshole to you when you correct an infraction. Apologize, correct, and move on. If I am polite and respectful when I point out the issue, the same in return would be nice.

As a troop: Not having my supervisor set out his/her expectations for me, i.e. no feedbacks.

Shaken1976
08-12-2013, 01:44 PM
Biggest pet peeve as a supervisor/NCO: people thinking they can pull rank, or be an asshole to you when you correct an infraction. Apologize, correct, and move on. If I am polite and respectful when I point out the issue, the same in return would be nice.

As a troop: Not having my supervisor set out his/her expectations for me, i.e. no feedbacks.

A few years ago when I first arrived on Lackland I saw an officer walking across the BX parking. He was on his phone and had his hat in his hand. I simply did the old tap my head and say "Sir cover" and he FLIPPED OUT.

Absinthe Anecdote
08-12-2013, 01:51 PM
A few years ago when I first arrived on Lackland I saw an officer walking across the BX parking. He was on his phone and had his hat in his hand. I simply did the old tap my head and say "Sir cover" and he FLIPPED OUT.

I would have flipped out too! Do you think you are a Marine? Calling a hat, cover, that's just absurd!

Shaken1976
08-12-2013, 01:58 PM
I would have flipped out too! Do you think you are a Marine? Calling a hat, cover, that's just absurd!

LOL. I have always called it cover.

sandsjames
08-12-2013, 03:04 PM
I hear you on the being late thing. Though in my case, i wouldn't call it a pet peeve so much as a moral imperative. Being on time, especially in the military, is important. Not showing up on time is disrespectful. But maybe, I'm just a nut about it.

Pet Peeve, for me, was when people didn't return emails or phone calls. I never was one to "spam forward" email, so when I did send one, it was usual something I needed an answer on. In this same category, was the trend before I retired of support service (MPF, Finance, primarily) not answering a customer service phone line. Why bother to have it then?

My pet peeve was receiving emails from my supervisor. We work in the same shop so if you have something for me then come talk to me. I'll never return an email from someone in my work center (before I retired!!!!!!!). If my boss doesn't have the communication skills to come talk to me in person, or have a shop meeting, then I have no use for them. I see Emails as a cop out for those passive aggressive types who are afraid of confrontation.

imported_DannyJ
08-12-2013, 03:22 PM
Lateness doesn't bother me so much if I get the call before hand. Folks that show up late without prior notice are asking for trouble.

Amn that ask questions on every direction wear me down. I certainly don't mind providing further information on certain tasks, but when I ask you to take out the trash, just take out the damn trash.

From my supervisors? Not making calls at their level...ever... and then being pissed when I get tired of it and go to the source.

TJMAC77SP
08-12-2013, 03:23 PM
My pet peeve was receiving emails from my supervisor. We work in the same shop so if you have something for me then come talk to me. I'll never return an email from someone in my work center (before I retired!!!!!!!). If my boss doesn't have the communication skills to come talk to me in person, or have a shop meeting, then I have no use for them. I see Emails as a cop out for those passive aggressive types who are afraid of confrontation.

Well, in fairness I have sent (and still do) emails to workers nearby when the idea I am communicating is complex, important or has information they will need later or when I know they can't (or don't need to) address it immediately. Of course I usually take a walk and speak with them as well. I do know what you mean about the 'bashful boss'. Tools.

Sergeant eNYgma
08-12-2013, 03:26 PM
As a troop: I hated having rules apply to me that didnt apply to them. Don't tell me I need to be at work READY to go when we open but everyday you just stroll in 10 mins after...of course this led to the "Well, why can't I"? attitude and other Airmen besides myself started to think the same.

As a (Soon to be) Superviser: I don't want to be lied to, if the situation warrants it I will fight to the death for you but if you lie to me I'll fuck your life up.

Rusty Jones
08-12-2013, 04:25 PM
Biggest pet peeve as a supervisor/NCO: people thinking they can pull rank, or be an asshole to you when you correct an infraction. Apologize, correct, and move on. If I am polite and respectful when I point out the issue, the same in return would be nice.

My biggest pet peeve as a PO was junior Sailors forgetting what their paygrade is, regardless of whether or not they were in the right and the senior person was in the wrong.

I am a firm believer in the senior person having a "right" to save face. This doesn't mean putting down or belittling the junior person. But the senior person should be the one who "looks good" walking out of the misunderstanding.

An example - a few months ago on facebook, a friend of mind who is still on active duty (a PO1) spoke of correcting someone; and a PO3 friend of his commented and spoke of how a Master Chief corrected him on cell phone usage at the gazebo. It turned out that the Master Chief was in the wrong, and the PO3 was telling him off, like "I can show you the instruction, or have you talk to may chain of command."

He then bragged about how me made the Master Chief walk away looking stupid.

It's a totally different Navy from the one I initially joined. Back then, if he told you to put the cell phone away, you did it. It didn't matter if you were right or wrong; back then, we had a concept called "pick your battles." You might be right, but you're still gonna lose.

Biggest pet peeve as a non-rate, and just in general as someone who was junior to someone else: Rules that are stated to apply to everyone on paper, but never in practice.

For example, at one command I was attached to when I was a PO2; PT was stated to be for "all hands."

Guess who never went? E6 and above.

Now, I have no problem with RHIP; in fact, I'm all for it. If they had stated that PT was mandatory for E5 and below, and optional for E6 and above... hey, I'd be all for it. But don't feed me the bullshit.

BTW, I brought this up and ASKED them to change the policy and only mandate it for E5 and below to that our intelligence would no longer be insulted. That didn't go over too well.

Juggs
08-12-2013, 04:44 PM
I hated getting repeat emails. The chief would send one out, the shirt would forward it to us, then the sup would forward it to us. For fun I forwarded it to the squadron a couple times to see what would happen. Laughter ensued for all E6 and below.

imnohero
08-12-2013, 04:59 PM
My pet peeve was receiving emails from my supervisor. We work in the same shop so if you have something for me then come talk to me. I'll never return an email from someone in my work center (before I retired!!!!!!!). If my boss doesn't have the communication skills to come talk to me in person, or have a shop meeting, then I have no use for them. I see Emails as a cop out for those passive aggressive types who are afraid of confrontation.

I never did send emails or call when the person was within walking distance. I still don't. Most of the time this occurred was when I sent an email to someone deployed, or sent one back home while I was deployed, asking for information. I mean, I could stay up until 2am to call you, but why? Just answer your damnable email. The other time it really bothered me was when I was doing something with Finance or MPF, and during an email exchange the person would just stop responding. Of course, this prompted a visit to their office by me. (one time this resulted in me finding out the person that was handling my PCS had separated and had not handed off any of their work)

js7799
08-12-2013, 05:03 PM
My biggest pet peeve as a PO was junior Sailors forgetting what their paygrade is, regardless of whether or not they were in the right and the senior person was in the wrong.

I am a firm believer in the senior person having a "right" to save face. This doesn't mean putting down or belittling the junior person. But the senior person should be the one who "looks good" walking out of the misunderstanding.

It shouldn't be about "saving face." If you're wrong, you're wrong; rank doesn't matter. Rank does matter when it comes to how you address it, although I'm all about mutual respect be it a Lt. Col or an Airman Basic I'm correcting. If done correctly, no one in the immediate area should even know what happened except the people directly involved. Just my 3 pennies.

Rusty Jones
08-12-2013, 05:14 PM
It shouldn't be about "saving face." If you're wrong, you're wrong; rank doesn't matter.

The problem is, in the minds of too many junior troops, being "wrong" equals bufoonery. Many also see a senior person being wrong as an opportunity to look good at their expense.

That Master Chief in the story I gave you... what if any of his subordinates had been there to see what happened? They probably would have lost some respect for him over it.

Again, the way it used to be was that; right or wrong, the senior person always "looked good" in the end. Not now.

Welcome to the rankless military.

js7799
08-12-2013, 05:19 PM
Rusty, I see your point. But I think it's a matter of how bad the infraction is and if it's done on purpose. Did said senior person intentionally break the rules, e.g. wear his/her sunglasses on their head? Or was it an oversight, like an accidently popped collar? I would hope the younger troops would know the difference and judge accordingly.

In any case, if someone is hoping to look good by pointing out the wrongdoings of others, perhaps they need to rethink their priorities.

jmb27
08-12-2013, 05:26 PM
I see Emails as a cop out for those passive aggressive types who are afraid of confrontation.

I had a flight chief that used to bitch people out in e-mails. He used all capital letters, exclamation marks, the whole nine yards. When I recieved one I would go to his office and he would talk softly and say that whatever the issue is wasn't a big deal.

Rusty Jones
08-12-2013, 05:33 PM
I had a flight chief that used to bitch people out in e-mails. He used all capital letters, exclamation marks, the whole nine yards. When I recieved one I would go to his office and he would talk softly and say that whatever the issue is wasn't a big deal.

Yep; had that happen to me a few times. In fact, I would run down to his office immediately after opening these emails; just to see if there was anything I could do to give him a warm & fuzzy. But then, it was as if he never sent the email.

I used to forward these emails home to my wife. Unfortunately, I don't have these emails anymore. I would have loved to be able to post them here.

Class5Kayaker
08-12-2013, 05:50 PM
I hated getting repeat emails. The chief would send one out, the shirt would forward it to us, then the sup would forward it to us. For fun I forwarded it to the squadron a couple times to see what would happen. Laughter ensued for all E6 and below.

This drives me CRAZY! Take the damn time to look in the "To" block of the email you received before sending it out again!!! If something has been emailed to "Base XYZ All Personnel" we don't need the shirt to email it out to everyone again, and then the flight chief to email it out to all of his folks again, etc.

Shaken1976
08-12-2013, 05:57 PM
Yep; had that happen to me a few times. In fact, I would run down to his office immediately after opening these emails; just to see if there was anything I could do to give him a warm & fuzzy. But then, it was as if he never sent the email.

I used to forward these emails home to my wife. Unfortunately, I don't have these emails anymore. I would have loved to be able to post them here.

We had a SNCO who would send out random e-mails of no great importance and then two seconds later come into your office to find the answer. Sometimes he beat the e-mail. One day he sent one to me asking what days I had scheduled for leave the following month. I was typing my response as he walked into the office. He then asked the same question. I told him I was in the middle of typing my response but answered him verbally instead. He then walks back to his office and I get another e-mail asking if I am going to answer his question. This all went down in about two minutes.

Same guy used to also send out tasks via e-mail from his office. Things like sweep the patio, take out the garbage, neaten the break room area ,and stuff like that. He then expected to see someone moving immediately to do his bidding. One day we were all in the office but were doing some training on a new peice of test equipment. When no one ran off to vacuum the front hallway he came in asking why...none of us were at the computers and had not yet seen the e-mail.

There is a time and place for e-mail. I will often follow up a shop meeting with an e-mail as to what was covered. Especially if there were important things that I want to make sure are conveyed correctly. I will also follow up on e-mail if there are multiple steps to a task or if I want to get something clarified. MSgt Smith, Just to clarify, I am cleared to do PT from 1530-1630, Mon, Wed, Fri...

71Fish
08-12-2013, 06:13 PM
When someone send me an email then comes to my desk to ask if I got their email. Why didn't you just walk over and talk to me in the first place?

Another regarding email, when someone emails me and CC's someone in leadership. I guess that is to give it and me a sense of urgency knowing Col or CMSgt So and so are aware. Doesn't usually work.

Mcjohn1118
08-12-2013, 07:05 PM
I have two pet peeves and to many probably seem trivial, but hey, the OP asked. First, I hate hearing "YEPS and NOPES or NAHS." If/when someone asks you a Yes/No question, especially if they are senior in rank (I'm talking NCO to Airman, not SrA to A1C, etc), please answer with a Yes Sir/Ma'am, or No Sir/Ma'am. Oh and since there are some Navy and Army brethren on here, if the term Sir bothers you as an enlisted person, please insert appropriate terminology like "No SSGT" or "No Chief" instead of just "Nope". Anyway, the second pet peeve I have is the phone ringing 3-4 times and I see someone at their desk but decides to screen or ignore the call.

Shaken1976
08-12-2013, 07:18 PM
I have two pet peeves and to many probably seem trivial, but hey, the OP asked. First, I hate hearing "YEPS and NOPES or NAHS." If/when someone asks you a Yes/No question, especially if they are senior in rank (I'm talking NCO to Airman, not SrA to A1C, etc), please answer with a Yes Sir/Ma'am, or No Sir/Ma'am. Oh and since there are some Navy and Army brethren on here, if the term Sir bothers you as an enlisted person, please insert appropriate terminology like "No SSGT" or "No Chief" instead of just "Nope". Anyway, the second pet peeve I have is the phone ringing 3-4 times and I see someone at their desk but decides to screen or ignore the call.

I don't screen my calls but I do check the caller ID. It sometimes changes how I answer the phone. If I know it is someone within the building I am not going into the entire spiel that I do for someone who is a customer. I also don't let it ring 3-4 times before answering. That being said...I was on hold for a call and there was only one other person in the office on his cell phone on a personal call. The phones were ringing and he just let them go. I actually had to tell him to put his cell away and answer work calls.

Rusty Jones
08-12-2013, 07:32 PM
Anyway, the second pet peeve I have is the phone ringing 3-4 times and I see someone at their desk but decides to screen or ignore the call.

This is definitely a military thing. On the outside, there's a reason for this. Some people organize themselves to return calls at certain times during the day, or days during the week.

Some people have a "rthym" going with how they get their work done... that will get thrown out of whack if they answer the phone.

I know that, in the military, none of this is supposed to matter.

But then... you have some people that are just "needy." They call about every little thing. Or someone calls with a few questions about a form. And they want you to walk them block-by-block on the whole damn form. You have some people that like to shoot the shit with you for awhile on the phone, after you've answered their questions and you're trying to get back to doing your work.

One thing I like about my job is that I get to use a little more discretion as to how I take care of phonecalls.

Rusty Jones
08-12-2013, 07:39 PM
At my job, we actually have one person who strictly works with SES'ers only. That's it. Her workload is actually very small. At least in theory it is. But the reason she exists is to deal with their neediness and to shoot the shit with them on the phone, if that's what they want to do.

LogDog
08-12-2013, 08:22 PM
I didn't mind if a troop occasionally came in late as long as it wasn't a pattern or the weren't missing a mandatory appointment or formation. If they were habitually late then I had no hesitation in giving them paperwork or making them work late to catch up on the work the missed because they were late.

My biggest pet peeve with troops was if they were disrespectful with each other and especially to anyone else, military or civilian. IMO, it was unprofessional for them to be disrespectful. If they're disrespectful with each other then they'll slip and be disrespectful with a SNCO or officer and then they'll be in trouble and I'll have to answer s to why my troop was disrespectful.

giggawatt
08-12-2013, 10:02 PM
Rusty, I see your point. But I think it's a matter of how bad the infraction is and if it's done on purpose. Did said senior person intentionally break the rules, e.g. wear his/her sunglasses on their head? Or was it an oversight, like an accidently popped collar? I would hope the younger troops would know the difference and judge accordingly.

In any case, if someone is hoping to look good by pointing out the wrongdoings of others, perhaps they need to rethink their priorities.

There's nothing more exhilarating than pointing out the short comings of others.

sharkhunter
08-12-2013, 10:05 PM
As a troop: unprofessional relationships. There have to be supervisors and subordinates. Yet, the subordinates sometimes become too friendly with the sups: making rude comments and insults to each other, making beer drinking plans on the weekends, making fun of others in the shop, passing on easy jobs to friends and hard jobs to others.
Another...being told to be ready to go on time. I arrived at 0725 with the uniform on and ready to work, yet half the shop are still in civilians and eating breakfast until at least 8am.

As a sup: Lying and not taking faults for your actions. If you crashed into the lamp post, just admit it and don't give me the runaround. Being late is not a pet peeve of mine, as long as my troop shows up before I do, then he/she is not late. So if I showed up at 8am and he/she arrived at 0755, they're not late.

technomage1
08-12-2013, 10:17 PM
Stupidity. Backstabbing. Politics.

BRUWIN
08-12-2013, 10:29 PM
Mine were:

1. Wood Sharks.

2. People that don't STFU in meetings, conferences, ect. They always have something to add and it's usually irrelevant...they can't just STFU.

3. People that reverse into parking places at work.

4. Snack bar thieves.

5. Debbie Downers/Negative Nancy's. They always seem to know why they can't possibly get something done...but never have a clue as to what they could do.

6. Smoke pit slobs.

7. Those that put those stiff cardboard thingy's in their ABU hat.

8. Flight suits when not flying.

9. Tech School Ropes...even 30 years later they still irked me.

10. Preprinted LOCs....just type the name in.

I got more. The list is endless.

tiredretiredE7
08-12-2013, 10:57 PM
My biggest pet peeve as a supervisor is people being late. It really gets under my skin. Then the excuses...there was a line at the gate, traffic, or whatever.

Also lying. Own it if you did something wrong.



As a troop...my supervisor throwing me under the bus for something they told me to do. Crappy feedback. Not having a backbone. I had one who refused to ever let anyone go early because the CC might get mad.

1. Women with female hygiene issues emanating unacceptable body odor (I had to counsel three women in field conditions over 20 years).
2. Leadership by exemption not by example (very common by CCs/Chiefs in the SF field). Chiefs in Maintenance led by example during my 20 years.
3. Thieves.
4. Careerists NCOs/SNCOs.
5. Finance and Personalists.

FLAPS, USAF (ret)
08-12-2013, 11:46 PM
3. People that reverse into parking places at work.



People backing into their spots. I thought I was the only one with that pet peeve. Do they think they're saving time somehow? Don't they realize that it takes more effort to back into most spots than to back out???

cloudFFVII
08-12-2013, 11:52 PM
People backing into their spots. I thought I was the only one with that pet peeve. Do they think they're saving time somehow? Don't they realize that it takes more effort to back into most spots than to back out???

But then they'd lose their "cool" points for driving ability. ;)

As a troop: A supervisor throwing someone under the bus all for the purpose of trying to make promotion, usually to the upper 2 enlisted ranks (Meaning, I don't have time for your problems or my work, you handle it for me, I'll be out of the office constantly, and so on).

As a supervisor: For the love of all things sacred, people who cannot get to work on time. Seriously. That's pretty much the first thing you're taught in BMT, outside of wearing of the uniform and marching. If you can't be on time, it's highly likely you'll have trouble with the more common aspects of military life (probably my least favorite excuse: "I live 40 minutes away and got stuck in traffic". My reply: "Well, the AF didn't tell you to live 40 minutes from work, but the AF does expect you to be present for duty".

Chief_KO
08-12-2013, 11:53 PM
People backing into their spots. I thought I was the only one with that pet peeve. Do they think they're saving time somehow? Don't they realize that it takes more effort to back into most spots than to back out???

They're tactical...ready to roll out to accomplish the mission (by that I mean go to lunch, the BX or go home)

FLAPS, USAF (ret)
08-12-2013, 11:56 PM
But then they'd lose their "cool" points for driving ability. ;)

As a troop: A supervisor throwing someone under the bus all for the purpose of trying to make promotion, usually to the upper 2 enlisted ranks (Meaning, I don't have time for your problems or my work, you handle it for me, I'll be out of the office constantly, and so on).

As a supervisor: For the love of all things sacred, people who cannot get to work on time. Seriously. That's pretty much the first thing you're taught in BMT, outside of wearing of the uniform and marching. If you can't be on time, it's highly likely you'll have trouble with the more common aspects of military life (probably my least favorite excuse: "I live 40 minutes away and got stuck in traffic". My reply: "Well, the AF didn't tell you to live 40 minutes from work, but the AF does expect you to be present for duty".

What bothers me the most about tardiness is that if you promised to pay people $10K for each time they showed up ON TIME, they'd always be early. This tells me it's all about priorities, and being on time isn't one of them.

AFcynic
08-13-2013, 12:13 AM
I don't screen my calls but I do check the caller ID. It sometimes changes how I answer the phone. If I know it is someone within the building I am not going into the entire spiel that I do for someone who is a customer. I also don't let it ring 3-4 times before answering. That being said...I was on hold for a call and there was only one other person in the office on his cell phone on a personal call. The phones were ringing and he just let them go. I actually had to tell him to put his cell away and answer work calls.

If a customer took time out of his/her day to come to my office for assistance, I'm going to give my physical customer my undivided attention. It's poor customer service. Every organization on Lackland already provides poor service, I want to be able to actually help people. You should see the shock on peoples faces when service organizations are polite and efficient.

Capt Alfredo
08-13-2013, 12:40 AM
What bothers me the most about tardiness is that if you promised to pay people $10K for each time they showed up ON TIME, they'd always be early. This tells me it's all about priorities, and being on time isn't one of them.

In most office jobs, being precisely on time is not important, so long as your work gets done and no one else if left picking up your slack.

FLAPS, USAF (ret)
08-13-2013, 12:48 AM
In most office jobs, being precisely on time is not important, so long as your work gets done and no one else if left picking up your slack.

True, but I was thinking of scheduled roll calls, dinner dates, etc....generally expected show times.

Gonzo432
08-13-2013, 12:55 AM
What bothers me the most about tardiness is that if you promised to pay people $10K for each time they showed up ON TIME, they'd always be early. This tells me it's all about priorities, and being on time isn't one of them.

Yes!!

Gonzo432
08-13-2013, 12:55 AM
People backing into their spots. I thought I was the only one with that pet peeve. Do they think they're saving time somehow? Don't they realize that it takes more effort to back into most spots than to back out???


You park like you're leaving. Many years as a Supply troop, I still back in/pull through. I also still hit the keys really hard from using a UTS-40 terminal (ancient computer system, I think they use it still today only with a Windows front.)

Gonzo432
08-13-2013, 12:58 AM
Mine were:

1. Wood Sharks.

2. People that don't STFU in meetings, conferences, ect. They always have something to add and it's usually irrelevant...they can't just STFU.

3. People that reverse into parking places at work.

4. Snack bar thieves.

5. Debbie Downers/Negative Nancy's. They always seem to know why they can't possibly get something done...but never have a clue as to what they could do.

6. Smoke pit slobs.

7. Those that put those stiff cardboard thingy's in their ABU hat.

8. Flight suits when not flying.

9. Tech School Ropes...even 30 years later they still irked me.

10. Preprinted LOCs....just type the name in.

I got more. The list is endless.

#9, I know what you mean.

imported_Shove_your_stupid_meeting
08-13-2013, 01:17 AM
Mine were:

2. People that don't STFU in meetings, conferences, ect. They always have something to add and it's usually irrelevant...they can't just STFU.




This, and there are a lot of these f***ers out there.

WX Vortex
08-13-2013, 02:17 AM
Supervisor or troop! Being lied to or lied on!! I absolutely HATE liars. Integrity first, correct?

SgtS
08-13-2013, 05:56 AM
9. Tech School Ropes...even 30 years later they still irked me.

We had a freshly minted Airman show up at our duty section still wearing his rope once, as if it actually meant something.

Peeves as a troop:

A.) Supervision who takes all the credit for the hard work their team does for them.

B.) Busy work. If there is nothing going on or nothing to do, don't start LOOKING for shit.

Peeves as a Supervisor

A.) Tardiness. You have a prescribed duty location and start time and it generally doesn't randomly change from day to day. Don't be fucking late!

B.) Not taking responsibility for actions. I have screwed up a lot of shit in my time. But I have owned and learned from everyone of those mistakes. Take responsibility for your actions and stop trying to blame other people for your incompetence.

C.) I also don't suffer fools or stupidity very well ... like, AT ALL.

FuelShopTech
08-13-2013, 06:07 AM
As a troop:

When they would take lazy, irresponsible people and, instead of making them do their jobs, they just moved them into an "easy" position with little to no responsibility.

Lazy people get rewarded for being lazy and the rest of us are stuck with all of the crap work.

As a supervisor:

People who put ZERO effort into maintaining their uniforms. You're in the military. Keeping your uniforms clean and up to date should be a priority. The fact that you'd rather blow all of your cash on video games is not an excuse for not getting your proper rank sewn on, or your blues dry cleaned.

BigBaze
08-13-2013, 06:37 AM
1. Incompetence. I hate walking into a support agency and ask a question, and they look at you like you asked them what the airspeed velocity of a fully laden African swallow is.

2. Training days. Are you telling me you can't provide 1 person out of your entire shop to man the phone while this event is going on? We pull it off just fine during squadron PT or CC calls etc.

YesIam
08-13-2013, 08:03 AM
The "its not my job" people. I understand there are some duties that truely are not our job, but in a customer support position it is your job to help out as much as you can. If you have the rights and knowledge for some things but your primary duties are something else, step up if the office needs help. People like that are the ones that give Personnelists and Knowledge Ops a bad name.

Excessive cussing in an office environment...especially when you are working at a MAJCOM or for the Wing CC. Dropping the F-bomb four times in one sentence when there are General officers within hearing range is a bit much. I'm not a prude, but there is a time and place, and in a high vis position is not it.

People who are put into a leadership position and get off on power trips. The guy I replaced in my current position made it a point to see how many times a week he could make the new Airman cry.

Drackore
08-13-2013, 11:31 AM
1) People with pet peeves are my pet peeves. :P

2) People that fuck up my time managment by overloading me with bullshit taskers then tell me I need better time management.

3) People that dump bullshit takers only on my shop because I have "the largest manpower pool". I have the largest manpower pool for a fucking reason, and it isn't so I can make you look fucking good for being an asskisser by saying yes to every fucking tasker that comes down from the group.

4) Premeetings (the meeting before a meeting)

5) Powerpoint

Chief_KO
08-13-2013, 12:19 PM
Uniform pet peeves:
1. Ranger Rolled hats, 2: Pockets sewn shut, 3. Not wearing specialty badge, 4. Starched/creased work uniform (fatigues, BDUs or ABUs), 5. Males wearing the "Mr Rodgers" sweater, 6. Not wearing ribbons on blues shirt.
Personnel pet peeves:
1. Made up positions (execs, protocol, AFSO 21, special assistant to the _______, etc.) If it is a real need, get a billet. Stop taking the best away from their PAFSC for your staff.
2. One-deep expertise
Management pet peeves:
1. Extra clean up in prep for a visit (especially the clean desk/clean in-box).
2. Having to set up the DV brief to include his/her favorite beverage/snack (and don't forget to turn the cup so the handle is facing the correct way!)
3. Staff meetings when more than 25% is spent on PT, EPRs.

FLAPS, USAF (ret)
08-13-2013, 12:44 PM
1. Scheduling any mandatory meeting between 1100-1300, or worse, a meeting lasts that whole time! Believe it or not, many of us like to run errands, work out, bang the wife, or many other things during this time, like EAT.

2. Scheduling a meeting over lunch at the last minute because you weren't able to hold it at the normal time. If you do this, then you're a d-bag. Do the right thing and canx that meeting. See #1 for things I like to do at lunchtime.

71Fish
08-13-2013, 12:52 PM
1. Incompetence. I hate walking into a support agency and ask a question, and they look at you like you asked them what the airspeed velocity of a fully laden African swallow is.2. Training days. Are you telling me you can't provide 1 person out of your entire shop to man the phone while this event is going on? We pull it off just fine during squadron PT or CC calls etc.

There are 47 swallows found in Africa, but only 2 named for the continent; the West African Swallow and the South African Swallow, with the South African Swallow being non-migratory. Which swallow are you having trouble finding the answer for? I fart in your general direction.

71Fish
08-13-2013, 12:56 PM
Mine were:

1. Wood Sharks.

2. People that don't STFU in meetings, conferences, ect. They always have something to add and it's usually irrelevant...they can't just STFU.

3. People that reverse into parking places at work.

4. Snack bar thieves.

5. Debbie Downers/Negative Nancy's. They always seem to know why they can't possibly get something done...but never have a clue as to what they could do.

6. Smoke pit slobs.

7. Those that put those stiff cardboard thingy's in their ABU hat.

8. Flight suits when not flying.

9. Tech School Ropes...even 30 years later they still irked me.

10. Preprinted LOCs....just type the name in.

I got more. The list is endless.

During my short time driving at UPS, we were taught that your first move should never be to reverse. The ideal way to park is to pass and scan the parking spot, then reverse to the drivers side if possible. Now when you pull out later, you see any obsticles in your way since you are pulling foreward first. Injuries and deaths in driverways always happen when someone backs first. You almost never hear of someone ulling foreward from their driveway and running over their kid.

Absinthe Anecdote
08-13-2013, 01:21 PM
During my short time driving at UPS, we were taught that your first move should never be to reverse. The ideal way to park is to pass and scan the parking spot, then reverse to the drivers side if possible. Now when you pull out later, you see any obsticles in your way since you are pulling foreward first. Injuries and deaths in driverways always happen when someone backs first. You almost never hear of someone ulling foreward from their driveway and running over their kid.

Why are people hating on backing into parking spaces?

Don't they realize that it is an ingenious and oh so subtle window dressing to my created persona of being highly organized and prepared.

Plus, backing into a parking spot in my F-350 with dualies allows me easy access to the tailgate so I can get at all those bake sale supplies, crock pots and hot plates for Top 3 fund raisers.

I think they are hating on backing into parking spots because I cut such an impressive figure as I back my gigantic highly waxed rig into a parking spot.

It makes others feel unorganized and sloppy and that's exactly why I do it!

BOSS302
08-13-2013, 01:34 PM
1) People who like to chew out others in front of a group of their peers. I've known many gung-ho types who say, "Well that's how the Army does it, hurr hurr!" We aren't the Army. I like to think one is professional enough and possessing enough empathy to pull the idiot to the side.

2) Uniform issues. It's one of the easiest things to do - wear the uniform properly. Just do it.

3) Military wives/girlfriends who openly flirt with others at squadron functions. It creates awkwardness.

4) Military husbands/boyfriends who openly bang whatever/whenver the moment they are on TDY or their significant other is on TDY. It creates awkwardness.

5) Drivers who think life is one big "Fast and Furious" movie. People die on the roads from reckless assholes such as them. I've been to one too many memorial services for people who died because of reckless/dangerous driving.

6) "My Guys". I talked about this in another thread. Perhaps it's a by-product of the new generation of NCOICs who came from a softer generation and rose through the ranks of a softer Air Force and thus they developed a "Mother Hen" mentality. This is the military. Sometimes you just have to shut the hell up & get shit done to earn your paycheck. And I have no sympathy when those NCOICs or supervisors whine that the Super or Commander "was mean to them*" and now we "have to do this bullshit.*" There is a time & place for the "my guys" attitude. At the end of the day, "your guys" belong to the Air Force and one needs to quit being a pain in the ass and start playing on the same team instead of acting like a referee.

7) **People in positions of leadership who give you taskings and blame those above them. Stop trying to be friends with everyone and start owning the responsibilities that come with higher rank, to include tactfully and professionally breaking the "bad news" of doing the stuff no one wants to do but has to do anyways.

8) Young and attractive female airmen (E2-E4) who, due to their peers and piss-poor leaders all playing nice and treating them like princesses in an attempt to get in their ABUs, have developed a holier-than-thou attitude and have lost just about all military bearing and military respect in regards to customs & courtesies.

9) Spiders.

10) Movies with rap "artists" in them.

20+Years
08-13-2013, 01:45 PM
During my short time driving at UPS, we were taught that your first move should never be to reverse. The ideal way to park is to pass and scan the parking spot, then reverse to the drivers side if possible. Now when you pull out later, you see any obsticles in your way since you are pulling foreward first. Injuries and deaths in driverways always happen when someone backs first. You almost never hear of someone ulling foreward from their driveway and running over their kid.

Back in first, or back out first, you spend the same amount of time backing up. In that time, no matter what you do, there is still a chance a kid on a bike will come zipping through the area.

1. Backing in does NOT make you look cool.
2. Other drivers do NOT enjoy waiting while you back in your precious vehicle (even if you think your fast and cool).
3. You did NOT up your chance of a quick escape if there is a zombie apocolypse. (as a matter a fact, if I see you running for a backed in car, I will kick you in the knee and knock you down for zombie fodder)
4. You are basically a douche, turn down your radio while you are at it LL Cool J.

XxATCxX
08-13-2013, 01:48 PM
Biggest pet peeve is supervisors who made rank because they did good at a test that is 50% useless information that doesn't pertain to the job and meanwhile suck at said job.

I'm not a supervisor but my biggest pet peeve is trainees who make excuses for every time they mess up during training (aka try to put two planes together or bust airspace etc) I expect them to mess up in training, but I also expect them to admit their mistake and move on, not make some stupid excuse for every time.

sandsjames
08-13-2013, 01:55 PM
Well, in fairness I have sent (and still do) emails to workers nearby when the idea I am communicating is complex, important or has information they will need later or when I know they can't (or don't need to) address it immediately. Of course I usually take a walk and speak with them as well. I do know what you mean about the 'bashful boss'. Tools.

I'd agree with that. If it's informational, something for a record, then email is fine. Though the complaint from imnohero was that he doesn't receive responses. There's really no need for a response to an email like unless you don't feel your troops will follow up. If that's the case, then there definitely needs to be some face to face going on.

To me the emailing of most things serves only one purpose. It's a CYA thing. It's to have "proof" that the you told somebody something. It's from a supervisor that wants to be able to pass the blame onto someone else instead of taking responsibility for his lack of communication skills and respect he has from his troops.

Rusty Jones
08-13-2013, 02:11 PM
Why are people hating on backing into parking spaces?

BRUWIN explained this before. It makes people look like they're eager to leave.

Interesting story:

In the Navy, when a ship pulls back in from an underway period; the rest of the day is normally off - everyone goes home, except for those in the duty section.

Also, the coveralls are worn underway and cannot be worn off the pier; and the NWU's (and formerly the utilities) are worn in port and can be worn off base.

So, what happens is that as soon as the ship pulls in; the FIRST thing that those not in the duty section whose sea & anchor station has secured do... is run down to the berthing, put on their civvies, and then grab their bags and start hanging around the quarterdeck; waiting to go on liberty.

But what happens? Chiefs see these guys standing around in civvies, and... "Hey shipmate, we need some help with that task over there. Go!"

And usually... that task ends up lasting pretty long. They're not finished until long after the brow was open.

I actually learned my lesson the first time. I was there two hours after the brow was open.

So what did I do next time? Instead of putting on my civvies and carrying a bag; I put on my utilities. I put all of my belongings in a bag, and left the bag in my shop. The utilities gave the impression that I was either in the duty section, or that I had intended to stay a little while to get something done. Or simply that I wasn't "eager" to leave. Of course, having a bag with me would kill the impression that I tried to make.

I would simply walk around topside, keeping a close eye on the brow. Because, you know, walking around in uniform gives people the impression that I'm actually doing something. As soon as the brow opened, I walked right off in my uniform. And I came back a few hours later to grab my bag.

Later on, I simply grabbed a few clothing articles to leave on the ship that I would only wear at liberty ports; that way I'd no longer have to go back for a bag.

But that's the way it works. The more eager you look to leave, the more likely you are to get stopped. I think that's a bitch move on the part of the leadership; but then again... why bitch about the system when you can game it?


7) **People in positions of leadership who give you taskings and blame those above them. Stop trying to be friends with everyone and start owning the responsibilities that come with higher rank, to include tactfully and professionally breaking the "bad news" of doing the stuff no one wants to do but has to do anyways.

Unfortunately, this is learned behavior. Many people you see doing this have had leadership that was the exact same way, so this is all they know.


Biggest pet peeve is supervisors who made rank because they did good at a test that is 50% useless information that doesn't pertain to the job and meanwhile suck at said job.

I don't know you, and I'm not trying to make accusations; but in my experience, the majority of the people who say this have sour grapes.

You have to remember that being a good technician does not equal being a good leader. Theoretical knowledge makes one a more competent leader; the ability to turn more wrenches in a day than the next guy does not.

71Fish
08-13-2013, 02:17 PM
Back in first, or back out first, you spend the same amount of time backing up. In that time, no matter what you do, there is still a chance a kid on a bike will come zipping through the area.

1. Backing in does NOT make you look cool.
2. Other drivers do NOT enjoy waiting while you back in your precious vehicle (even if you think your fast and cool).
3. You did NOT up your chance of a quick escape if there is a zombie apocolypse. (as a matter a fact, if I see you running for a backed in car, I will kick you in the knee and knock you down for zombie fodder)
4. You are basically a douche, turn down your radio while you are at it LL Cool J.

It isn't about saving time, it's about safety and saving money due to damages from improper backing. If you work(ed) in mx, then you know the troubles people have with backing a vehicle.

20+Years
08-13-2013, 02:30 PM
I know the troubles people have with backing in by watching everyone trying to back in. God help us when this generation is a bunch of retirees trying to back in thier cars in the commisary parking lot.

Absinthe Anecdote
08-13-2013, 03:07 PM
Backing into a parking spot DOES make you look cool!

Airmen who back into parking spots stand out when mixed in with other airmen, much like Combat Comm airmen used to stand out, before they got rid of Combat Comm and took away their ball hats.

Anyway, I got to go wax my F-350...

Grammar Police
08-13-2013, 03:35 PM
As a (Soon to be) Superviser: I don't.....

My biggest pet peeve is how fast people are allowed to become NCOs without knowing how to spell. Another pet peeve is how this person will claim that this is the Internet and how spelling shouldn't matter.

71Fish
08-13-2013, 03:45 PM
My biggest pet peeve is how fast people are allowed to become NCOs without knowing how to spell. Another pet peeve is how this person will claim that this is the Internet and how spelling shouldn't matter.

Do you not know how to use the active voice?

BigBaze
08-13-2013, 04:02 PM
There are 47 swallows found in Africa, but only 2 named for the continent; the West African Swallow and the South African Swallow, with the South African Swallow being non-migratory. Which swallow are you having trouble finding the answer for? I fart in your general direction.

I'm too busy to fully answer this question since I am trying to build a large wooden badger..I mean rabbit.

Pullinteeth
08-13-2013, 05:30 PM
I hate a supervisor that has no backbone... If I ask for your help, don't tell me to try what I have already done again...I asked for your help for a reason...

I hate it when my minions won't give me a straight answer... If I ask why you didn't do something don't tell me what you did...tell me why you didn't do what I am referring to...


I never did send emails or call when the person was within walking distance. I still don't.

I do it ALL the time... When I get a tasking that is something for my Administrative Professional, I will email it to her rather than walking across the hall, trying to explain what someone wants (probably incorrectly), and leaving her more confused than just forwarding her the damn email. Now I will walk over there to clarify if need be but.... There are also times when the email serves as a record...

XxATCxX
08-13-2013, 06:58 PM
"I don't know you, and I'm not trying to make accusations; but in my experience, the majority of the people who say this have sour grapes.

You have to remember that being a good technician does not equal being a good leader. Theoretical knowledge makes one a more competent leader; the ability to turn more wrenches in a day than the next guy does not.

Last edited by Rusty Jones; Today at 11:33 AM. "

Well I'm not talking about turning wrenches, I'm talking about keeping airplanes separated in the air. And although I agree being good at your job does not necessarily make you a good leader, I have yet to see a good leader who is bad at their job. Being a good leader requires the respect of those who you are leading. The AF is the first place I have worked (I was a auto mechanic and worked for an insurance company before AF) where people are promoted based on their knowledge of random trivia facts that have nothing to do with your responsibilities or how much time you volunteer outside of your duty days. I'm sorry but whether or not I know what CMSgt of the AF did this or did that is completely irrelevent to anything I do or will do short of the promotion test.

Mcjohn1118
08-13-2013, 11:04 PM
1) People with pet peeves are my pet peeves. :P

2) People that fuck up my time managment by overloading me with bullshit taskers then tell me I need better time management.

3) People that dump bullshit takers only on my shop because I have "the largest manpower pool". I have the largest manpower pool for a fucking reason, and it isn't so I can make you look fucking good for being an asskisser by saying yes to every fucking tasker that comes down from the group.

4) Premeetings (the meeting before a meeting)

5) Powerpoint

YES!!! Pre-briefs are a huge waste of time.

Mr. Happy
08-13-2013, 11:46 PM
1 - People who apparently have no job or responsibilities lighting my inbox up every day with every conceivable event the Top 3 or Chief's Group is hosting.

2 - Crucifying otherwise well written EPRs with changes on A1Cs thru SSgt...a little hint, the board probably will not see those, or if they do, they will carry little weight.

3 - People or organizations who have the means to help you with a problem or provide the assistance, but yet automatically say no or direct you through the most hassle laden and bureaucratic direction possible.

4 - Air Force people who say "hooah"...grates the nerves.

5 - Short notice taskers that require reading a 200+ page document...with those I just quick scan key words related to my function and press on.

6 - Cynical people who bitch regardless of what you try to do, but NEVER offer anything positive or solutions.

7 - People who double park a vehicle in congested areas that are already hard to find a spot; especially if it is some hunk of shit vehicle.

8 - Careerist

71Fish
08-14-2013, 12:03 AM
1 - People who apparently have no job or responsibilities lighting my inbox up every day with every conceivable event the Top 3 or Chief's Group is hosting.

2 - Crucifying otherwise well written EPRs with changes on A1Cs thru SSgt...a little hint, the board probably will not see those, or if they do, they will carry little weight.

3 - People or organizations who have the means to help you with a problem or provide the assistance, but yet automatically say no or direct you through the most hassle laden and bureaucratic direction possible.

4 - Air Force people who say "hooah"...grates the nerves.

5 - Short notice taskers that require reading a 200+ page document...with those I just quick scan key words related to my function and press on.

6 - Cynical people who bitch regardless of what you try to do, but NEVER offer anything positive or solutions.

7 - People who double park a vehicle in congested areas that are already hard to find a spot; especially if it is some hunk of shit vehicle.

8 - Careerist

Damn I hate that. If you spent much time with F-15s there is a SNCO with the initials SB who uses a version of hooah (sounds like hwup) like a period at the end of a sentence. The first time I was in a meeting with him I thought he had the hiccups.

Sergeant eNYgma
08-15-2013, 12:08 PM
My biggest pet peeve is how fast people are allowed to become NCOs without knowing how to spell. Another pet peeve is how this person will claim that this is the Internet and how spelling shouldn't matter.

Yoo guessed it, spelling doesn't matter it's the interwebz after all...

imported_chipotleboy
08-15-2013, 01:11 PM
YES!!! Pre-briefs are a huge waste of time.

Depends on the briefer. A lot of guys I work with have the briefing ability of the kid who plays the tree in the 2nd grade Holiday Pageant.

BENDER56
08-15-2013, 02:09 PM
This isn't a pet peeve 'cause I'm retired and no longer give two s#!ts, but I'm guessing about 95% of enlisted personnel air force-wide have their chevrons sewn way too high on the sleeves of their ABUs. Look around and tell me I'm not right.

71Fish
08-15-2013, 02:23 PM
When someone is briefing and reads word for word what is on the power point slide.

Pullinteeth
08-15-2013, 02:28 PM
Clapping during the AF song... Yes I know they re-wrote the AFI to allow/encourage it but c'mon! As I always say..."clap if you don't know the words."

20+Years
08-15-2013, 03:41 PM
YES!!! Pre-briefs are a huge waste of time.

I love pre-briefs. There is nothing like sitting in a meeting and already knowing for what I am being briefed on. I also like a post-brief, so I can ensure what I was pre-briefed and then briefed on is actually what I think it was.

:fing02:

tiredretiredE7
08-15-2013, 03:54 PM
I love pre-briefs. There is nothing like sitting in a meeting and already knowing for what I am being briefed on. I also like a post-brief, so I can ensure what I was pre-briefed and then briefed on is actually what I think it was.:fing02:

I worked for a prior enlisted female Capt that used to want to have a "working lunch" to prepare a meeting for a pre-brief to ensure the briefing would be very "professional".

BENDER56
08-15-2013, 08:18 PM
I love pre-briefs. There is nothing like sitting in a meeting and already knowing for what I am being briefed on. I also like a post-brief, so I can ensure what I was pre-briefed and then briefed on is actually what I think it was.

:fing02:

That's AF training in a nutshell:
1. Tell them what you're going to teach them.
2. Teach them.
3. Tell them what you taught them.

OtisRNeedleman
08-15-2013, 08:25 PM
Most meetings. WAY too many meetings turn into verbal masturbation sessions. When I was in a position to call my own meetings I did it Captain Kirk style - situation was pretty serious and the meeting lasted no longer than needed to address the problem and determine the course of action.

Shaken1976
08-15-2013, 08:48 PM
Most meetings. WAY too many meetings turn into verbal masturbation sessions. When I was in a position to call my own meetings I did it Captain Kirk style - situation was pretty serious and the meeting lasted no longer than needed to address the problem and determine the course of action.

Just today I attended a training class that was 1.45 hours. My attention was gone after 30 minutes when all the pertinent info was given.

imported_chipotleboy
08-16-2013, 12:22 AM
Most meetings. WAY too many meetings turn into verbal masturbation sessions. When I was in a position to call my own meetings I did it Captain Kirk style - situation was pretty serious and the meeting lasted no longer than needed to address the problem and determine the course of action.

I once read a management book called "Up the Organization" by the guy who raised AVIS Car Rental from a small business to the #2 car rental company in the US. He said he would hold his staff meetings without chairs in the room. It focused the meetings on important items and cut out the chatter.