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Shaken1976
07-30-2013, 05:52 PM
Often times running around town on weekends or on Thursday and Fridays after work I run into brand new airmen and their families. Normally I just say congrats and move on. A few times I have been asked questions about active duty. This past weekend I was asked by a father what the best advice I had for their son was. I told him....Don't break the law. Know the difference between a crime and a mistake. And last but not least....stay in shape.

What would you add?

Measure Man
07-30-2013, 06:02 PM
1. Get your education
2. Invest/Save some money
3. Marry wisely

Not necessarily in that order.

OtisRNeedleman
07-30-2013, 06:06 PM
I can think of some things..
1. Learn how to manage your time and your money.
2. Stay away from drugs and watch how much you drink. And NEVER drink and drive.
3. Always try to do the right thing.
4. It's a one-mistake Air Force, unfortunately.
5. Don't be in a hurry to get married. And if you can't feed 'em, don't breed 'em.
6. Come with honor, serve with honor. If you find the AF isn't for you, just do your time and leave with honor.

Measure Man
07-30-2013, 06:07 PM
Good stuff

I always told my Airmen, and my own kids, that those were the 3 most important decisions in their life.

technomage1
07-30-2013, 06:09 PM
Shut your mouth and open your ears.
Be humble.

SENDBILLMONEY
07-30-2013, 06:17 PM
Often times running around town on weekends or on Thursday and Fridays after work I run into brand new airmen and their families. Normally I just say congrats and move on. A few times I have been asked questions about active duty. This past weekend I was asked by a father what the best advice I had for their son was. I told him....Don't break the law. Know the difference between a crime and a mistake. And last but not least....stay in shape.

What would you add?

Do only four and not a day more.
Take on no financial obligations you can't pay off by the THREE year point (just in case of a rollback).
Pick a skill that is marketable in civilian life.
Take your experience and GI Bill, use your education benefits, don't look back.

LogDog
07-30-2013, 06:28 PM
My list of things to tell them:

1. Your young but that doesn't mean you have to get married right away. Take time to learn about life.
2. Don't do stupid things. If you don't know doing something is wrong or right then then answer this question: "If what you did was printed in the paper or on TV, would you be proud or embarrassed of what you did?" If you're embarrassed then chance are it's the wrong thing.
3. Save your money. You don't have to have the newest items. A new car becomes a used car the second you drive it off the dealer's lot. Early in your career, you'll be moving more often so buy durable items or used items. Save the luxury items for later in life. Don't try to keep up with what your friends have. Buy only what you really need.
4. Learn to invest. You have decades ahead of yourself to build your wealth and the earlier you start the more you'll likely have when you need it.
5. Take every opportunity to learn your job. Take advantage of any additional training, schools, etc. to gain experience. Listen and learn from those above you who have learned the jobs that you are now learning.
6. Promote yourself out of your job. Do an outstanding job so when a better position opens you'll be considered for it.
7. Learn how the promotion system works. Do wait until a couple of months before testing to start studying. Begin a year before your scheduled test date.
8. Don't be afraid of being nominated for awards. Winning awards throughout your career will aid you later in consideration for special assignments and promotion to the SNCO ranks later in your career.
9. Prepare yourself for leaving the military. Take college courses and complete your degree(s) for the career you want in civilian life.
10. Remember, no matter how bad it may get, there will be more positive memories of your service than negative memories.

euripedes
07-30-2013, 06:30 PM
1. Be prepared to become part of a team.
2. Listen to your trainers and instructors. Whatever career you have will stand on that foundation. Know it, Apply it.
3. Learn how to do your job before you move on to anything else. College money is great but if you don't pass the CDC's, it won't matter.
4. Don't blow your credit early. Enjoy the dorm, get a beater if you need a car.

Rusty Jones
07-30-2013, 06:31 PM
Do only four and not a day more.
Take on no financial obligations you can't pay off by the THREE year point (just in case of a rollback).
Pick a skill that is marketable in civilian life.
Take your experience and GI Bill, use your education benefits, don't look back.

Do NOT get married, do NOT get a woman pregnant, and if you can... avoid getting into ANY serious relationship.

Contribute a significant amount of money to TSP. Had I not married my first wife, I'd have saved up enough money to buy a mobile home and furnish it - that way, even IF all I could get was a job at McDonald's, I'd still be okay.

Make E5 before you get out. Believe it or not, many employers are aware that this is the paygrade where supervisory experience begins. If you get out without having made E5, you're shooting yourself in the foot.

Take all the CLEP/DSST exams that you can while you're in. They take as little as two weeks to study for; and all you need is an old edition of textbook for the subject of the exam that you're studying for. You can get them off of Amazon for as cheap five bucks. CLEP/DSST exams don't count against your TA for the year, and they don't count against your GI Bill.

That said... finish your degree before you get out. If you do your CLEP and DSST exams, you can finish well before your ETS. You've heard it many times before: the bachelor's degree is the new high school diploma.

imported_AFKILO7
07-30-2013, 07:06 PM
Do NOT get married to your tech school sweetheart. Knockout your CDC's ASAP, then school. Learn your job and don't take shortcuts.

Bunch
07-30-2013, 07:26 PM
I always told this to my applicants before they went to BMT:
1. Don't get in trouble, your life could probably be ruined
2. Don't marry in Tech School to a girl you just met there
3. Don't get married to get out of the dorms
4. Don't go to apartment parties
5. Don't buy anything (TV, radio, Ipod, Iphone, Laptops, DVD's video games) you probably could get it for free or heavily discounted at Airmen's attic or from a friend
6. Don't buy a car until you ar at least a SrA...buy a bike or get rides from dorm buddies
7. You only have one time to make a first impression, if you present yourself as a professional ready to contribute people will respect you, if you present yourself as a douchebag that image will haunt you probably until you PCS

LogDog
07-30-2013, 07:29 PM
Another item I'd include would be:

How you arrive into a squadron is just as important as how you leave a squadron. Make sure your entrance and exit leaves a positive impression.

VFFTSGT
07-30-2013, 07:31 PM
Do only four and not a day more.
Take on no financial obligations you can't pay off by the THREE year point (just in case of a rollback).
Pick a skill that is marketable in civilian life.
Take your experience and GI Bill, use your education benefits, don't look back.

This! Do your initial enlistment. Don't waste all of your money, save a little, and stay out of debt. Maximize your TA benefit by using it. Then pick a marketable career that is in demand and use your GI BIll for college, technical training, etc.

Bottom line: use and abuse your benefits because the air force sure will use and abuse you.

20+Years
07-30-2013, 07:44 PM
At your first duty station, if you find yourself in a drunken stupor out in a field in the middle of the night, don't try to pet the raccoon. :nono2:

Absinthe Anecdote
07-30-2013, 07:59 PM
1. Get your education
2. Invest/Save some money
3. Marry wisely

Not necessarily in that order.

I really needed someone like you to pound that into my head 20 years ago!

I had a few people try to warn me but I didn't listen despite that little voice inside of my head screaming at me too.

If only someone water-boarded me or just took me on a walk through base housing to see a real full grown depend-a-potamous in action.

Measure Man
07-30-2013, 08:07 PM
I really needed someone like you to pound that into my head 20 years ago!

So did I!

20+Years
07-30-2013, 08:10 PM
If only someone water-boarded me or just took me on a walk through base housing to see a real full grown depend-a-potamous in action.

OMG!!! My life would be so different! You think we could get this tour added to FTAC?

Absinthe Anecdote
07-30-2013, 08:16 PM
OMG!!! My life would be so different! You think we could get this tour added to FTAC?

I’m uncontrollably laughing at the prospect of that.

20+Years
07-30-2013, 08:18 PM
I was thinking that or they take them to an Enlisted Spouses Group meeting.... that would put the fear in them.

imported_AFKILO7
07-30-2013, 09:14 PM
Lord knows I've quite a few of the mistakes outlined in this thread. But I'm equally happy there are still an equal amount of them I managed to dodge. Some of what my parents said must've stuck and I had some good NCO's/SNCO's early on too.

KellyinAvon
07-30-2013, 10:59 PM
Pay attention, learn from what and who is around you. Learn from good leaders (what to do) and from bad leaders (what not to do).

Chief_KO
07-31-2013, 02:26 AM
Get your first assignment far away from home
Always get off base and explore the local area
Use your benefits
Take good care of your body
If you broke it, fix it...if it's dirty, clean it
Blossom where you're planted
Make it better than you found it
And always marry your second wife first!!

imported_Renazance
07-31-2013, 09:56 AM
1. Many have mentioned it but I can't stress it enough...don't be in a rush to get married. Stay single and enjoy your youth. Get married and have kids when you're mentally and financially able to.
2. Step out of your comfort zone. Volunteer for as many TDYs as you can, even if they don't sound too appealing. Some of my best TDY experiences were to places I dreaded going to at first.
3. Don't post stupid sh!t online. It'll come back to bite you in the long run.

fufu
08-01-2013, 03:59 AM
I always told this to my applicants before they went to BMT:
1. Don't get in trouble, your life could probably be ruined
2. Don't marry in Tech School to a girl you just met there
3. Don't get married to get out of the dorms
4. Don't go to apartment parties
5. Don't buy anything (TV, radio, Ipod, Iphone, Laptops, DVD's video games) you probably could get it for free or heavily discounted at Airmen's attic or from a friend
6. Don't buy a car until you ar at least a SrA...buy a bike or get rides from dorm buddies
7. You only have one time to make a first impression, if you present yourself as a professional ready to contribute people will respect you, if you present yourself as a douchebag that image will haunt you probably until you PCS

As an adult, not having a vehicle screams lazy, moocher douchebag. You're an adult, get a f'ing car. I, nor any of the other people in the workcenter, are your GD taxi drivers.

Shaken1976
08-01-2013, 04:04 AM
As an adult, not having a vehicle screams lazy, moocher douchebag. You're an adult, get a f'ing car. I, nor any of the other people in the workcenter, are your GD taxi drivers.

I would say...don't buy a brand new car you can't really afford. Don't buy at a buy here pay here lot. Your car should get you from point A to point B. You don't need a brand new SS Camaro or Mustang GT to do that as an airman. Knew a guy with a $650 car payment as an airman. His insurance was $300+ a month. Dumb move.

Bunch
08-01-2013, 04:12 AM
As an adult, not having a vehicle screams lazy, moocher douchebag. You're an adult, get a f'ing car. I, nor any of the other people in the workcenter, are your GD taxi drivers.

They can get a bike also.

Quixotic
08-01-2013, 07:01 AM
A few SNCO/NCOs will provide a great example of what to be.

Other SNCO/NCOs will provide a great example of what not to be.

Know the difference, see the difference, then be the difference.

fufu
08-02-2013, 03:41 AM
They can get a bike also.

Bikes are great in Florida. How's that bike working in Minot? Ellsworth? Fairchild? Elmo?

Not worth a shit in the winter. Be an adult, get a vehicle!

NOTE: This is my soapbox. As a Section Chief, nothing pissed me off more than A1C Snuffy needing a ride to his appt b/c he/she didn't have a car. Now, I have to give up 2 bodies for half hour instead of one? FTS! Start walking...

Funny story: A1C doesn't have a car, hasn't had a car for awhile(i.e. he isn't brand new). A1C breaks ankle and is in walking boot. WC is very busy and A1C NOCAR needs a ride to the med group. Nobody is available to drive him, he cries to the section chief. Section Chief tells him to start walking, A1C NOCAR says "I can only stand/walk for 15mins at a time". Section Chiefs says, "hang on". SC comes back with a folding chair. Hands it to A1C NOCAR and says start walking, sit down every 15 minutes.

Still makes me LOL thinking about it.

Bottom Line: Adults are RELIABLE, RESPONSBILE human beings. Not having a car, makes you not reliable.

Bunch
08-02-2013, 03:49 AM
Bikes are great in Florida. How's that bike working in Minot? Ellsworth? Fairchild? Elmo?

Not worth a shit in the winter. Be an adult, get a vehicle!

NOTE: This is my soapbox. As a Section Chief, nothing pissed me off more than A1C Snuffy needing a ride to his appt b/c he/she didn't have a car. Now, I have to give up 2 bodies for half hour instead of one? FTS! Start walking...

Funny story: A1C doesn't have a car, hasn't had a car for awhile(i.e. he isn't brand new). A1C breaks ankle and is in walking boot. WC is very busy and A1C NOCAR needs a ride to the med group. Nobody is available to drive him, he cries to the section chief. Section Chief tells him to start walking, A1C NOCAR says "I can only stand/walk for 15mins at a time". Section Chiefs says, "hang on". SC comes back with a folding chair. Hands it to A1C NOCAR and says start walking, sit down every 15 minutes.

Still makes me LOL thinking about it.

Bottom Line: Adults are RELIABLE, RESPONSBILE human beings. Not having a car, makes you not reliable.

A car is not a necessity, is a luxury, and one in which many airmen when they join can't afford, at least IMO. I rather have my airmen carpooling and giving a hand to each other that see any one of them fall into financial hardship and all what that entails. Granted they don't need to buy the coolest thing on the block but many of them do and then clearances are being pulled, guys are broke because 80% of their paycheck goes to car, insurance and gas. No way dude, in this one we would disagree.

Airborne
08-02-2013, 05:26 AM
My list of things to tell them:

1. Your young but that doesn't mean you have to get married right away. Take time to learn about life.
2. Don't do stupid things. If you don't know doing something is wrong or right then then answer this question: "If what you did was printed in the paper or on TV, would you be proud or embarrassed of what you did?" If you're embarrassed then chance are it's the wrong thing.
3. Save your money. You don't have to have the newest items. A new car becomes a used car the second you drive it off the dealer's lot. Early in your career, you'll be moving more often so buy durable items or used items. Save the luxury items for later in life. Don't try to keep up with what your friends have. Buy only what you really need.
4. Learn to invest. You have decades ahead of yourself to build your wealth and the earlier you start the more you'll likely have when you need it.
5. Take every opportunity to learn your job. Take advantage of any additional training, schools, etc. to gain experience. Listen and learn from those above you who have learned the jobs that you are now learning.
6. Promote yourself out of your job. Do an outstanding job so when a better position opens you'll be considered for it.
7. Learn how the promotion system works. Do wait until a couple of months before testing to start studying. Begin a year before your scheduled test date.
8. Don't be afraid of being nominated for awards. Winning awards throughout your career will aid you later in consideration for special assignments and promotion to the SNCO ranks later in your career.
9. Prepare yourself for leaving the military. Take college courses and complete your degree(s) for the career you want in civilian life.
10. Remember, no matter how bad it may get, there will be more positive memories of your service than negative memories.

You had some good ones but I would probably say to not get so wrapped up in getting promoted and job chasing that you forget what its like to be in the military. Drinking, chasing girls, that first "mistake" vehicle and maxing out your paycheck by the 16th puts some hair on your chest. Some lessons you have to learn yourself. Oh, and dont get married before your 10 year mark or 30 years old. Also, pick a job thats translates to the outside. There arent many jobs loading bombs on the bottom of fighter jets outside of the gate.

2G071
08-02-2013, 04:35 PM
Bikes are great in Florida. How's that bike working in Minot? Ellsworth? Fairchild? Elmo?

Not worth a shit in the winter. Be an adult, get a vehicle!

NOTE: This is my soapbox. As a Section Chief, nothing pissed me off more than A1C Snuffy needing a ride to his appt b/c he/she didn't have a car. Now, I have to give up 2 bodies for half hour instead of one? FTS! Start walking...

Funny story: A1C doesn't have a car, hasn't had a car for awhile(i.e. he isn't brand new). A1C breaks ankle and is in walking boot. WC is very busy and A1C NOCAR needs a ride to the med group. Nobody is available to drive him, he cries to the section chief. Section Chief tells him to start walking, A1C NOCAR says "I can only stand/walk for 15mins at a time". Section Chiefs says, "hang on". SC comes back with a folding chair. Hands it to A1C NOCAR and says start walking, sit down every 15 minutes.

Still makes me LOL thinking about it.

Bottom Line: Adults are RELIABLE, RESPONSBILE human beings. Not having a car, makes you not reliable.

On the car issue, I guess it depends on where you are. My first assignment was in England in the late '80's. I lived in the barracks but not having a car meant hanging around the base on weekends or bumming rides into town – not to mention walking to and from work in the ubiquitous English rainy weather. After about 3 months on base, a guy PCSing out was selling his 7 or 8 year old Mini (they weren’t spelled with all capitals back then…) for a fair price. I mentioned it to my supervisor who told me that I would be “an absolute idiot” to buy a car as a (then) Amn-select. He told me to get an insurance quote downtown first. Glad I did – I was quoted $155 a month for liability only! Since I was clearing just over $425 a month, I decided that that spending over a third of my take home just for insurance was probably not a smart idea so made the decision to I walk for my entire tour. I don’t remember it ever being an issue with my supervision that I took a little longer to walk from work to appointments.

Measure Man
08-02-2013, 04:59 PM
A car is not a necessity, is a luxury, and one in which many airmen when they join can't afford, at least IMO.

Definitely depending on location. For the most part, to be a bonafide adult, one needs to have transportation. Maybe if you're stationed in a large East Coast city, you can get by without one, or overseas...

Most Airmen can/should be able to afford a decent used car.

I did once work with a TSgt who, up to that point, had never even had a driver's license. Not sure how he did it. When I knew him, we were overseas though, and he was living in the dorm, walked to work and bummed rides off-duty, but didn't go out much. I honestly don't know how he did it. He was rich as anything though...

Shaken1976
08-02-2013, 05:24 PM
On the car issue, I guess it depends on where you are. My first assignment was in England in the late '80's. I lived in the barracks but not having a car meant hanging around the base on weekends or bumming rides into town – not to mention walking to and from work in the ubiquitous English rainy weather. After about 3 months on base, a guy PCSing out was selling his 7 or 8 year old Mini (they weren’t spelled with all capitals back then…) for a fair price. I mentioned it to my supervisor who told me that I would be “an absolute idiot” to buy a car as a (then) Amn-select. He told me to get an insurance quote downtown first. Glad I did – I was quoted $155 a month for liability only! Since I was clearing just over $425 a month, I decided that that spending over a third of my take home just for insurance was probably not a smart idea so made the decision to I walk for my entire tour. I don’t remember it ever being an issue with my supervision that I took a little longer to walk from work to appointments.

The insurance deal is something many fail to realize. An SUV is going to be a bit higher than a small sedan. Shop around for insurance and the car. Figure out what works best. If all else fails...get a scooter.

That being said...some people just shouldn't have a car, scooter, motorcyle, or anything else with wheels. Had an airman in one year on station wreck two vehicles, drop two crotch rockets, and hit a curb with a bike and go head first over. He didn't like it when we brought in a huge roll of bubble wrap for him.

Shaken1976
08-02-2013, 05:27 PM
Definitely depending on location. For the most part, to be a bonafide adult, one needs to have transportation. Maybe if you're stationed in a large East Coast city, you can get by without one, or overseas...

Most Airmen can/should be able to afford a decent used car.

I did once work with a TSgt who, up to that point, had never even had a driver's license. Not sure how he did it. When I knew him, we were overseas though, and he was living in the dorm, walked to work and bummed rides off-duty, but didn't go out much. I honestly don't know how he did it. He was rich as anything though...

I bought my first car with my own money at 16. It was an 86 Chevy Cavalier. It was three different shades of blue and was definately a rattle trap. But it got me from point A to point B which is the point of a car. I see so many airmen now pass up a perfectly good car that they could pay cash for to get something shiny and new. This is where they make that mistake. I paid cash for most of my cars. I bought my first new car in 2002. It was a two seater pick up. GMC Sonoma. It was the last one on the lot of the previous model year. I got a sweet deal on it and had great monthly payments.


Another thing I often see is the I made rank vehicle purchase. Doesn't matter if the other one was still just fine.

TWilliams
08-02-2013, 07:08 PM
I bought my first car with my own money at 16. It was an 86 Chevy Cavalier. It was three different shades of blue and was definately a rattle trap. But it got me from point A to point B which is the point of a car. I see so many airmen now pass up a perfectly good car that they could pay cash for to get something shiny and new. This is where they make that mistake. I paid cash for most of my cars. I bought my first new car in 2002. It was a two seater pick up. GMC Sonoma. It was the last one on the lot of the previous model year. I got a sweet deal on it and had great monthly payments.


Another thing I often see is the I made rank vehicle purchase. Doesn't matter if the other one was still just fine.

I was like you. I bought my first car as an 18 year old A1C. It was a 96 mercury tracer that the birds just love to crap on all the time. It got me from point A to B just fine. Then I hit my mid life crisis last year and bought a Dodge Challenger. Not the smartest move financially, but I love it and it was worth every penny! I read an article a couple months ago that said that the used car inventory is so low that there are certain models out there that the price is close between new and used that it is better to just buy new.

RobotChicken
08-02-2013, 09:11 PM
I was like you. I bought my first car as an 18 year old A1C. It was a 96 mercury tracer that the birds just love to crap on all the time. It got me from point A to B just fine. Then I hit my mid life crisis last year and bough a Dodge Challenger. Not the smartes move financially, but I love it and it was worth every penny! I read an article a couple months ago that said that the used car inventory is so low that there are certain models out there that the price is close between new and used that it is better to just buy new.

'My first car was a '63 SS Chevy Nova 'hardtop' with a 2 speed power slide posi traction inline 6 194ci and it sipped gas and hauled butt for $75!!"

Bunch
08-02-2013, 10:02 PM
Definitely depending on location. For the most part, to be a bonafide adult, one needs to have transportation. Maybe if you're stationed in a large East Coast city, you can get by without one, or overseas...

Most Airmen can/should be able to afford a decent used car.

I did once work with a TSgt who, up to that point, had never even had a driver's license. Not sure how he did it. When I knew him, we were overseas though, and he was living in the dorm, walked to work and bummed rides off-duty, but didn't go out much. I honestly don't know how he did it. He was rich as anything though...

You should come here to Chicago. I routinely screen applicants from 20 to 45 and many of them have never owned a car and some of them don't even know how to drive and they do ok in life.

Absinthe Anecdote
08-02-2013, 10:38 PM
You had some good ones but I would probably say to not get so wrapped up in getting promoted and job chasing that you forget what its like to be in the military. Drinking, chasing girls, that first "mistake" vehicle and maxing out your paycheck by the 16th puts some hair on your chest. Some lessons you have to learn yourself. Oh, and dont get married before your 10 year mark or 30 years old. Also, pick a job thats translates to the outside. There arent many jobs loading bombs on the bottom of fighter jets outside of the gate.

I never liked having hair on my chest and would always go to the salon for waxing. It can be more economical to just shave it if you are concerned about your budget though.

imnohero
08-02-2013, 10:54 PM
Concrete financial advice that I wish I had known and followed:

A car payment and insurance should not exceed 25% of your take home pay.
Put at LEAST 10% of your monthly pay into savings.
Rent (or house payment) should not exceed 35% of your take home pay.
Guard your credit rating, more often than you might think, it is the passkey to life. (put in simplest terms, always pay your bills on time)
Learn how to fix things yourself and don't replace things that aren't broken.

Measure Man
08-02-2013, 11:12 PM
You should come here to Chicago. I routinely screen applicants from 20 to 45 and many of them have never owned a car and some of them don't even know how to drive and they do ok in life.

Absolutely...Key point "in Chicago."

Big cities, it's definitely doable, other places, not so much.

BRUWIN
08-03-2013, 01:11 AM
Always use the elevator when one is available.

Never be a lender...always be the borrower.

FuelShopTech
08-03-2013, 01:13 AM
Advice to new female Airmen:

1. Don't be the dorm ho. Just because a man sleeps with you doesn't mean he likes you.

2. Make sure you're physically capable of doing the job you signed up to do. If you're not, start hitting the gym.

3. Babies are expensive. If you start crapping out kids, you can plan on doing 20 years in the military, or marrying a military guy and becoming a BMW.

4. Avoid "The Wives." If they try to pump you for information on what their husbands did on that TDY, plead ignorance and excuse yourself. Quickly.

5. Going out and getting smashed every weekend is a great way to get yourself in trouble.

LogDog
08-03-2013, 03:51 AM
You should come here to Chicago. I routinely screen applicants from 20 to 45 and many of them have never owned a car and some of them don't even know how to drive and they do ok in life.
I had an airmen from New York City and she never had a driver's license because living in the city she didn't need one. We had to use squadron funds to get her driving lessons so she could get her license.

Measure Man
08-03-2013, 05:42 AM
Advice to new female Airmen:

1. Don't be the dorm ho. Just because a man sleeps with you doesn't mean he likes you.

2. Make sure you're physically capable of doing the job you signed up to do. If you're not, start hitting the gym.

3. Babies are expensive. If you start crapping out kids, you can plan on doing 20 years in the military, or marrying a military guy and becoming a BMW.

4. Avoid "The Wives." If they try to pump you for information on what their husbands did on that TDY, plead ignorance and excuse yourself. Quickly.

5. Going out and getting smashed every weekend is a great way to get yourself in trouble.

Not sure what everyone has against the Dorm Ho...those are some of my favorites.

Much respect!

jshiver15
08-03-2013, 10:56 AM
Can't be foot-stomped enough . . manage your finances. I've seen MOST problems new Airmen have being related to their finances. Either they have marital issues involving money problems or they go delinquent on payments.

VCO
08-03-2013, 12:40 PM
Don't mess around with military females. Piss the wrong one off and you are a sex offender for life.

Gonzo432
08-03-2013, 01:05 PM
I'd forgot about troops without licenses. I trained a lot a troops on forklifts (some of them never saw a forklift before), but they move a lot slower. From past experience of training people on driving a car, don't let the guy from Atlanta teach them to drive. No good will come from that.

Rainmaker
08-03-2013, 04:54 PM
just do your job to the best of your ability and don't worry about what you're going to get for doing it.

jondstewart
08-04-2013, 02:56 AM
1. If you get stationed in a more rural or conservative area (Altus, Barksdale, Goodfellow, Minot, Whiteman, etc), stay away from the local girls who tend to look for young Airmen as a meal ticket and future sucker to milk for child support. In fact, forget about marrying until you're at least 30 and established in your career!

2. Get more than just a simple CCAF degree, even if nothing you want to do job wise later on requires a degree! Going to college is easy now while you're in, as opposed to the old days where a night class here and there was the best you could do if you had the drive

3. Don't expect a good paying job (more than $50K per year) after you retire from what you did in the Air Force as enlisted , unless you go to work for the state or government. And those jobs are not as easy to come by as they once were

4. Try to think "old school" in supervision and leading once you are a Senior Airman or Staff Sergeant. Forget all the stuff you learned in PME and having to be a PC social worker type. Put a foot in their a$$ if they mess up or try to take advantage of you! And if they report you to your supervisor, so what!

5. Before you go in, try to stay out of career fields where you deploy to combat zones a lot. And with the Army! Even though they are the largest branch of the military, they are a different breed, plus very rude and a little strange

LogDog
08-04-2013, 09:04 PM
1. If you get stationed in a more rural or conservative area (Altus, Barksdale, Goodfellow, Minot, Whiteman, etc), stay away from the local girls who tend to look for young Airmen as a meal ticket and future sucker to milk for child support. In fact, forget about marrying until you're at least 30 and established in your career!

2. Get more than just a simple CCAF degree, even if nothing you want to do job wise later on requires a degree! Going to college is easy now while you're in, as opposed to the old days where a night class here and there was the best you could do if you had the drive

3. Don't expect a good paying job (more than $50K per year) after you retire from what you did in the Air Force as enlisted , unless you go to work for the state or government. And those jobs are not as easy to come by as they once were

4. Try to think "old school" in supervision and leading once you are a Senior Airman or Staff Sergeant. Forget all the stuff you learned in PME and having to be a PC social worker type. Put a foot in their a$$ if they mess up or try to take advantage of you! And if they report you to your supervisor, so what!

5. Before you go in, try to stay out of career fields where you deploy to combat zones a lot. And with the Army! Even though they are the largest branch of the military, they are a different breed, plus very rude and a little strange
Hey! My brother serve 20 years in the Army and that comment was out of lin...... uh, you've got a point there.

omertalifestyle
08-05-2013, 01:52 AM
1. Don't believe anything you hear. Figure it out for yourself and bring the reference with you when talking to the so called "subject matter expert".
2. Don't trust your supervision to actively fight for you, don't hesitate to use your chain of command and if that doesn't work, the IG.
3. Learn your job and don't be afraid to take initiative to do something new.
4. Go to school, use your TA. Finish your CCAF now and get your degree before your first enlistment is over.
5. Cross train at the first chance you get and don't let anyone stop you. Also put in for special duties when available.