PDA

View Full Version : HOT: GI Bill transfer rules change at the end of the month!



CrustySMSgt
06-26-2013, 09:57 AM
I wasn't aware of this until I read this article... starting 1 July the waiver for an ADSC commitment, even for those retirement eligible, expires. ADSC doesn't kick in until you transfer, so if yuo haven't already done so, you've got until the end of the month! You can always pull the transfer back for 15 years after you retire, but you can only transfer prior to separating/retiring. Best advice I've heard is to transfer all but one credit to your dependents; you can always take them back if you plan on going to school, BUT is you only transfer one credit to them and die, the rest of the credits go with you!




Troops nearing retirement can't transfer GI Bill benefits without giving 4 more years
By Jennifer H. Svan Stars and Stripes Tweet

Published: June 25, 2013

DVIDSKAISERSLAUTERN, Germany — Beginning Aug. 1, all active-duty military personnel who opt to transfer their Post-9/11 G.I. Bill benefits to a family member will be obligated to four more years of service, including troops who are eligible for retirement.

Through mass e-mails, squadron briefings and other methods, military officials at bases in Kaiserslautern are making efforts to inform servicemembers of the pending rule change that mostly affects senior officers and enlisted personnel who are nearing retirement.

Implemented on Aug. 1, 2009, as a recruiting and retention incentive, the Post-9/11 G.I. Bill allows eligible servicemembers to transfer unused education benefits to immediate family members.

For most servicemembers, the obligation to sign up for four more years has applied since 2009. After the Post 9/11 G.I. Bill was introduced, temporary rules for servicemembers nearing retirement were approved that allowed them to incur anywhere from no additional time to three years of service when they transferred benefits, depending on their retirement eligibility date, according to military officials.

That waiver period expires at the end of next month, said Keith Davis, chief of education and training at the Ramstein education office.
“It’s across the board,” he said. “Effective Aug. 1, all members of the military, regardless of branch, will be required to serve a four-year active-duty service commitment at the time they elect to transfer benefits to a family member.

“The clock does not start ticking until they execute the actual transfer,” he said, and doesn’t necessarily mean those servicemembers must re-enlist for another four years.
“You have to give the military four years from the day you execute the transfer,” Davis said. “If you have two years left and you transfer (benefits), you would have to extend for an additional two years to satisfy the requirement.”

To transfer Post-9/11 G.I. benefits, a servicemember must have a minimum of six years in the military; to be eligible to receive those benefits, a dependent, whether a spouse or child, must be enrolled in the Defense Enrollment Eligibility Reporting System (DEERS) computerized database.

Military members are able to pull back the benefit after transferring it, up to 15 years after separation, Davis noted, but they cannot transfer benefits after separating or retiring from the military.
“You have to be on active duty,” he said.

Members of the Selected Reserve are also eligible to transfer benefits.

In a news release on the pending rule change, Army officials noted that soldiers who are involuntarily separated under force-shaping initiatives who had previously transferred their Post-9/11 G.I. Bill education benefits may retain the transferred benefits without needing to repay them.

That is true for the Air Force, also, with some limitations, Davis said. “It has to be action out of the control of the member. If the member did something that changed the type of discharge from ‘honorable’ to ‘something other than honorable,’ that would negate the transfer.”

Since the benefits inception, the transfer option has been popular with servicemembers at Ramstein, Davis said, with interest tending to pick up around the time of high school graduation.

“It’s on their minds then,” he said, and “they’ve probably done some price checking” of what college costs.

Davis encourages personnel thinking of transferring benefits — a process that can be done online — to visit their education office first.

“We can talk through whether the transfer is the way to go,” he said, noting that in some cases, dependents may be eligible for other benefits.

svan.jennifer@stripes.com

71Fish
06-26-2013, 01:06 PM
I wonder if they worked out the math so there are no HYT issues.

On another note, my wife graduated this past friday from the GI Bill benefits I transfered to her!

Pullinteeth
06-26-2013, 01:18 PM
You can always pull the transfer back for 15 years after you retire, but you can only transfer while on AD.

Might want to re-read the article;

"Members of the Selected Reserve are also eligible to transfer benefits."

CrustySMSgt
06-26-2013, 02:00 PM
I wonder if they worked out the math so there are no HYT issues.

On another note, my wife graduated this past friday from the GI Bill benefits I transfered to her!

I suspect that is why the 3 year waiver was in place... if you failed to take advantage of the waiver period, I'm guessing you're ass out after 30 Jun if 4 years would put you past HYT.


Might want to re-read the article;

"Members of the Selected Reserve are also eligible to transfer benefits."

Rog, I misspoke... I meant if you are AD, you must transfer before you separate/retire. Same would apply to eligible ARC members, they could do so when eligible, but not after they retire/separate. Thanks for setting me straight! :)

Pullinteeth
06-26-2013, 03:58 PM
Rog, I misspoke... I meant if you are AD, you must transfer before you separate/retire. Same would apply to eligible ARC members, they could do so when eligible, but not after they retire/separate. Thanks for setting me straight! :)

Not exactly....If you are AD and separate and immediately go into the AFR or ANG, you are still GTG, if you are in the Reserve and go to the ANG=GTG. Reserve and go ADAF=GTG. The only time you might have an issue with switching components is if you went from the Guard to another component (for some reason the Guard tends to discharge instead of separate and transfer and a discharge would be a bad thing).

CrustySMSgt
06-27-2013, 03:50 AM
Not exactly....If you are AD and separate and immediately go into the AFR or ANG, you are still GTG, if you are in the Reserve and go to the ANG=GTG. Reserve and go ADAF=GTG. The only time you might have an issue with switching components is if you went from the Guard to another component (for some reason the Guard tends to discharge instead of separate and transfer and a discharge would be a bad thing).

Either I haven't had enough coffee or you're drunk... lol

Yes, if moved from being AD to ARC and were still eligible you would still be able to transfer, which would seem to be stating the obvious (the word eligible kinda gives it away). The point is once you are no longer eligible (AD or qualifying ARC) you can't transfer.

Pullinteeth
06-27-2013, 04:39 PM
Either I haven't had enough coffee or you're drunk... lol

Yes, if moved from being AD to ARC and were still eligible you would still be able to transfer, which would seem to be stating the obvious (the word eligible kinda gives it away). The point is once you are no longer eligible (AD or qualifying ARC) you can't transfer.

Right...just clarifying because you said when you separate from AD or ARC you would be ineligible...if you separate and continue to serve, you are still eligible... If you are DISCHARGED or go IRR, then you are no longer eligible...

Chief_KO
06-27-2013, 06:52 PM
Another reason not to transfer 100% of your GI Bill upfront. If you qualify for VA voc rehab (chapter 31), you can select between using your GI bill monthly stipend or your voc rehab stipend. Most cases the GI bill stipend will pay more.
All you need to use the GI bill is 1 day of eligibility.

Pullinteeth
10-03-2013, 07:34 PM
Poll: Troops using Post-9/11 GI Bill on their own educations
More than half don't transfer much of benefit

From Military Times http://www.militarytimes.com/article/20130927/EDU02/309270014/Poll-Troops-using-Post-9-11-GI-Bill-their-own-educations

So a college asked current students shortly after TA was shut off and then turned back on if they planned on using their GI Bill? And the results surprised who again?