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Chief_KO
06-04-2013, 07:07 PM
I have a couple:
1. BMTS: As we were lying prone firing the M-16 (w/ .22 adapter) the Airman to my left yelled out "OUCH" (and maybe a couple other words). Seems the ejected cartridge from my rifle bounced and hit him in the eye. It actually fused his eyelids together. The CATMS trainer came over and popped his eyelids back open.
2. Robins AFB: Qualifying on the .38 revolver (back in the day before the 9mm). There was a Lt qualifying as well. Had to help him with his belt and holster. He was a good shot, providing the target was about 10 ft in front and laying flat on the ground. He could have thrown the pistol at the target and scored better. Needless to say, he was the only one that day who did not qualify.

Calmo70
06-04-2013, 07:12 PM
Pease AFB NH - 1979 - had to re-qualify on M-16. This was during the days they were using 22 caliber adapters on the M-16 to save money. Anyway, young SrA next to me kept missing the target, in fact hitting my target several times. Instructor asked him what the problem was and SrA tells the instructor the gun was "kicking" too much. Come to find out SrA had an assignment to Korea and thought that if he failed qualification he would have his assignment cancelled. Needless to say - that didn't work.

LogDog
06-04-2013, 08:05 PM
I have one similar to Calmo70. I had to re-qualify on the M-16 along with a bunch of others in our squadron. After we did some practice firing to sight in our weapons, we shot for qualifying score. When my target was checked I had 10 extra holes in it. It turns out the guy next to me on my right had 10 shots less in his target. I re-qualified but he didn't. He didn't shot my target on purpose or to try to fail but simply shot at the wrong target.

imported_chipotleboy
06-04-2013, 08:28 PM
AFROTC Field Training 1987 at Lowry/Buckley -- .38 revolver qualification -- we were told that as long as we shot in the general direction of the target and didn't hit any fellow cadets or instructors that we would qualify.

20+Years
06-04-2013, 08:41 PM
Back in the mid 90s, Keesler, we went out to qualify. There was a nurse (like a LtCol) who needed to pass to go overseas in something like 2 days. The lady couldn't have shot straight to save her life. This was back when there was no ammo shortage like today. One of the instructors grabbed his weapon and went down about 4 lanes to practice. When the next round ended she miraculously had just over passing in her target, the instructor seemed to have missed his target just about the same amount.

OtisRNeedleman
06-04-2013, 09:07 PM
Goodfellow AFB, early 1982, during my SIGINT Officer course. Some of us heading overseas had to go shoot the .38. Went to the cop shop, who were the honchos for shooting. We were standing around with our pistols waiting to go shoot when the SPs brought in a deserter. He looked pretty mellow about the whole thing. We went to shoot. You guessed it...some of us had more holes in the target than bullets fired. Nobody gave a shit. The box was checked. Don't think I even touched an AF weapon after that for the rest of my career.

One from Osan when I was a linguist. For some reason they had a bunch of us go get re-familiarized with the M-16 one hot Korean summer day. We were in a classroom and some SP TSgt shows up for the pre-brief. He said, "Security Service, huh? Okay, guys, the bullet comes out of this end!", pointing to the end of the barrel. We shot. It was fun.

RFScott
06-04-2013, 09:10 PM
This is a hearsay story, but I thought I would share. My flight commander at my last base had gone to do his M-9 qualification and came back with an interesting story. Apparently the person in the lane next to him decided to adjust his safety goggles with the business end of his pistol just before firing....

SomeRandomGuy
06-04-2013, 10:04 PM
I have a couple:
1. BMTS: As we were lying prone firing the M-16 (w/ .22 adapter) the Airman to my left yelled out "OUCH" (and maybe a couple other words). Seems the ejected cartridge from my rifle bounced and hit him in the eye. It actually fused his eyelids together. The CATMS trainer came over and popped his eyelids back open.
2. Robins AFB: Qualifying on the .38 revolver (back in the day before the 9mm). There was a Lt qualifying as well. Had to help him with his belt and holster. He was a good shot, providing the target was about 10 ft in front and laying flat on the ground. He could have thrown the pistol at the target and scored better. Needless to say, he was the only one that day who did not qualify.

A girl in my sister flight shot a perfect 57 out of 50 during her qualification. The girl next to her shot a pretty terrible 7 out of 50.

El Kabong
06-05-2013, 12:25 AM
moody afb, maybe 1987, M-16. we shot the first bunch of rounds for sight alignment then went to look at the targets. mine looked like i hit it with a shotgun using buckshot, all over the place. the tsgt catm guy looks at it and says, well, it ain't the gun.

imported_DannyJ
06-05-2013, 12:53 AM
Our dorm chief in basic shot an 8. No shit, an 8. The hilarity only really began when the TI got a look at our scores. He proceeded to call him trainee 8 for the remainder of basic.

Bunch
06-05-2013, 01:40 AM
Ever wondered why on M16 qualification left handed shooters are ask to go to the right side separated from right handed shooters? Yeah I learned the hard way on basic. BTW I shot a 4 out of basic... Had to do remedial once I got to my unit.

B1k3rBoi
06-05-2013, 02:28 AM
Ft. Riley, Kansas- ILO training with the Army. We were on the M9 range and a MSgt decided to use his pistol to scratch his head with the Range Master standing right next to him. Range Master flipped his shit, took the guys weapon and escorted him off the range.

Malmstrom AFB, Mont.- Shotgun training. The range was covered halfway with a roof that was supported by 4x4 wood beams every 10 feet or so. A female next to me had a misfire or something and blew one of the beams in half, wood splinters flew everywhere. It was actually a pretty cool sight.

TREYSLEDGE
06-05-2013, 06:34 AM
Lackland '95, M-9 training. It was July and they let us remove our BDU blouses because of the heat. One of my brass flew down the T-shirt of the girl next to me (our t-shirt collars were streched out from the sweat of marching to the range that morning). She bitched me out like I did it on purpose. Before we finished I think a couple more made it into her shirt. She didn't talk to me for a couple of days after that.

Guam '01, M-9 trianing. A medical logistics Capt came to the range in his short sleeve blues. That was the first sign of trouble. He was next to me of course and I don't think he ever held a weapon before. He flagged me twice before he was escorted off the range.

F.E. Warren '10, M-4 training. We were at an outdoor range due to repairs on the indoor range. It was Dec, temps in the 20s with 30 MPH winds (pretty standard for Wyoming). We zero'ed the M-4 then the instructors, who were just as frozen as us, said that their observation of how well we handled the weapons during zeroing allowed them to qualify us all and we left to warm up.

insidiousbookworm
06-05-2013, 06:55 AM
During CST (Combat Skill Training) I was next to a Medical Captain who managed to fire a round straight through his rifle strap.

JD2780
06-05-2013, 11:26 AM
Watched those charged with base security have to shoot several cycles just to qualify. Yup, keep defending my family. Aah, never mind. Ill do it myself thanks.

JD2780
06-05-2013, 01:01 PM
I was un-Q several times in my LE days. It wasn't until I got a flight physical prior to retraining that I discovered I needed glasses. Shortly after that I went out to the range with the German AF and fired their rifle. I was the only person on the range that day to go 6 for 6 on a half man knockdown @100meters.

Can't shoot what you can't see. It's legit!!

ttribe
06-05-2013, 01:03 PM
Watched those charged with base security have to shoot several cycles just to qualify. Yup, keep defending my family. Aah, never mind. Ill do it myself thanks.

I was un-Q several times in my LE days. It wasn't until I got a flight physical prior to retraining that I discovered I needed glasses. Shortly after that I went out to the range with the German AF and fired their rifle. I was the only person on the range that day to go 6 for 6 on a half man knockdown @100meters.

SomeRandomGuy
06-05-2013, 01:05 PM
Story I heard from a CATM Instructor: A SSgt was qualifying on M-9. This guy was absolutely nailing it. Very accurate and almost looked like he was getting into it a little too much. The CATM instructor asks him what his stratgey for shooting so well is. He said, "I got in an argument with my wife last night so I just pictured her face on the target". They escorted him off the range right away.

JD2780
06-05-2013, 01:10 PM
I was un-Q several times in my LE days. It wasn't until I got a flight physical prior to retraining that I discovered I needed glasses. Shortly after that I went out to the range with the German AF and fired their rifle. I was the only person on the range that day to go 6 for 6 on a half man knockdown @100meters.

Can't shoot what you can't see. It's legit!!

JD2780
06-05-2013, 01:11 PM
Story I heard from a CATM Instructor: A SSgt was qualifying on M-9. This guy was absolutely nailing it. Very accurate and almost looked like he was getting into it a little too much. The CATM instructor asks him what his stratgey for shooting so well is. He said, "I got in an argument with my wife last night so I just pictured her face on the target". They escorted him off the range right away.

I think that one is just a good story from the CATMs guys. Regardless it's damn funny.

loggie94
06-05-2013, 01:11 PM
During CST (Combat Skill Training) I was next to a Medical Captain who managed to fire a round straight through his rifle strap.


Last time on an AF range, I was next to a medical officer as well. She actually qualified (barely) based on shot placement, but was the last one done every round by several minutes... While not a perfect shot, I typically unholstered, shot, reloaded and shot again before she had pulled the trigger twice. I've seen muzzle-loaders fired more rapidly...

I must admit, despite growing up huntin' varmit.... during basic, I was one of those that helped the shooting average of those around me. You see, I didn't bother wearing my glasses during basic training. My shot grouping at the close-range was a 2in circle (w/the old .38s), but once moved to the medium and distance targets, my shot grouping became a horizontal line that covered my target and the two targets on either side, cause I wasn't sure which one was mine.

My best experience involved going to INTAC training -- We spent one class day on the range doing weapons familiarization, which meant we spent the day shooting M-9, .45, M-4, AK-47 and a couple shotguns. Most of the shooting time was spent with the M-9, but rather than just the 30-40 rounds to qualify, we shot a couple hundred rounds in a variety of situations, which included everything from shooting from the draw in close-quarter self defense to ending the day with a multi-target one-on-one shooting competition. It was a definate shift from learning how to operate the weapon to learning how to save your life with the weapon.

coloringoutsidethelines
06-05-2013, 02:07 PM
JBER '10 I had a medical officer who did not speak very good English in my class. When we first started handling the weapon she kept dropping it. CATM removed her from the class and had her shoot at the range by herself.

JBER '11 About halfway through my shoot I for whatever reason started shooting at the target to my right instead of my own. That guy was happy to get his first expert and I had to reshoot.

JD2780
06-05-2013, 02:14 PM
Whats the medical trend here? Doh.

Mn of the docs don't speak English very well?

20+Years
06-05-2013, 02:24 PM
Whats the medical trend here? Doh.

JD2780
06-05-2013, 02:25 PM
Whats the medical trend here? Doh.

Mn of the docs don't speak English very well?

My wife has had to work docs and techs that can barely speak English then use their inability for speaking English as an excuse for screwing up. I understand you came here but learn the language and learn it well. Also here is another idea, make folks take a language test. I would think its pretty important for folks working in an ICU, L&D or ER to speak English clearly.

Sergeant eNYgma
06-05-2013, 02:58 PM
I shot the M16 at basic and when my magazine was empty I tried to bend down to pick it up with my weapon still facing in front of me. The instructor ran over yelling "WTF TRAINEE, WTF"!!!!!!! He picked the mag up and forcefully placed it in my hand....O and I qualified but barely I think I gave the guy next to me an extea 3 pts SMH...

ttribe
06-05-2013, 03:54 PM
Old school qualification lesson. Funnier today than when it happened. I was about 12 years old on my grandfathers Walnut Shade Mo. farm. My cousin and I were out shooting stuff. I don't quite remember my transgression with the gun, but my grandfather ran up, took the 30.06 pump action from me and cracked me across the back with the stock. I do remember it knocked the sh*t out of me. I also remember my mother running from the house and screaming at my grandfather. I'm pretty sure he prevailed in that conversation. Apparently that is how boys in my family learn about gun safety. I wasn't banned from handling his guns, but I never screwed around with them again. A lesson that I remember everytime someone brings up firearms safety.

It's a tool in my box, I doubt I will ever have to break that one out on my boys, or grandhildren.

I'm sure many a CATM wish they could crack a knucklehead or two on the range when they screw up.

technomage1
06-05-2013, 06:21 PM
A couple incidents...back when I first came in we fired the M-16. Since it hadn't been modified to the A1 yet, it still had full automatic instead of burst. Until the change was made, it was quite common to hear people empty their magazines accidently when qualifying or zeroing because they'd flipped the selector to full automatic instead of semi. And there was no disguising that "BBRRRRTTTT" sound instead of a bang - everyone knew who had done it.

The first time we fired with a gas mask - this would have been in 2004 - the instructor gave us no tips for it. So we donned the masks, got into the prone position, got the command to fire, then all you heard was a bunch of thunks as people tried to bring the rifles to their cheeks and hit the mask instead. Then there was a bunch of "What the" and "Huh"s as we tried to figure it out.

Fired once with a Lt who had to have Aspergers. He was a great guy, an absolute genius, but he just had a certain way about him. We shot OK, but when it came time to clean the weapons (M4 & M9) he did the most meticulous job I've ever seen. You could've performed surgery with that weapon, it was that clean. I don't know how long it took him in the end, but the rest of us cleaned our weapons, the classroom, the restrooms, and shot the breeze for an hour while he was still cleaning. Finally CATM took mercy on us and released us without him. I'm pretty sure one day I'm going to see him patent a new weapon design because I'm sure his mind was cranking about it while he worked on every part.

Calmo70
06-05-2013, 07:32 PM
Not a training/qualification story. But, funny anyway. Charleston AFB about 1974. I worked nights in the Pax Terminal. Three cops came in to get coffee in the cafeteria. Go back to their truck (an old Dodge P/U single bench seat cab). Guy sitting in the middle has a M-16, gets in and puts M-16 between his legs with barrel on the floor. As he is adjusting himself and M-16, driver gets in, spills coffee on the middle guy - middle guy jerks the M-16 up and shoots the truck through the firewall of the truck and puts a hole through the air cleaner, radiator, and front grill of the truck. Luckily, the truck was parked in front of the pax terminal's brick wall as the bullet hit that and pretty much died. All of us in the Pax Terminal heard the gunshot and thought something bad was going on - but then found out it was just a cop killing a pick up truck.

JD2780
06-05-2013, 07:35 PM
Not a training/qualification story. But, funny anyway. Charleston AFB about 1974. I worked nights in the Pax Terminal. Three cops came in to get coffee in the cafeteria. Go back to their truck (an old Dodge P/U single bench seat cab). Guy sitting in the middle has a M-16, gets in and puts M-16 between his legs with barrel on the floor. As he is adjusting himself and M-16, driver gets in, spills coffee on the middle guy - middle guy jerks the M-16 up and shoots the truck through the firewall of the truck and puts a hole through the air cleaner, radiator, and front grill of the truck. Luckily, the truck was parked in front of the pax terminal's brick wall as the bullet hit that and pretty much died. All of us in the Pax Terminal heard the gunshot and thought something bad was going on - but then found out it was just a cop killing a pick up truck.

That cop would have some explaining to do. Why was it on fire (I've seen this a few times), why was a round chambered. Only the M9 is supposed to have a round chambered. Oh well.

Cops destroy vehicles on an hourly occurrence.

LogDog
06-05-2013, 07:51 PM
During CST (Combat Skill Training) I was next to a Medical Captain who managed to fire a round straight through his rifle strap.
Always beware of medics bearing weapons.

RobotChicken
06-05-2013, 08:26 PM
TSA would be all over that 'terrorist' moment.....be a wild west shoot out before it was over!

Absinthe Anecdote
06-05-2013, 08:36 PM
TSA would be all over that 'terrorist' moment.....be a wild west shoot out before it was over!

No emoticons!!?!!

Holy Cow!

Keep up the good work!

RobotChicken
06-05-2013, 08:52 PM
"Only for you!!"...'RC'.

Chief_KO
06-05-2013, 09:00 PM
Preparation for ORI, 5th Combat Comm, circa 1989. Two live fire discharges at deployed locations. Group CC said no more and "heads would roll if another". One month later, shot rang out from armory shelter...TSgt and Sgt armorers inside...both white as a ghost. Their story was an M-16 fell over and discharged. Real story, they were playing "quick draw McGraw" with loaded, safety's off M-16s about 5 ft from each other.
Post deployment there was a new SrA and Amn in the unit...

Bunch
06-05-2013, 09:30 PM
On my first base I was doing SF augmentee duty and we had this shift supervisor that was a pain in the ass. She be on this SF kids for any single thing making their lives very miserable, she just had SSgt put on but she carry herself like she was CSAF. One morning coming into getting our briefing we were getting our weapons and she was loading her M9 on the safe area and had an accidental discharge, it scared the shit out of everyone there. I don't think I ever saw her again in all my days remaining as a augmentee.

The thing I don't understood though was why she got in apparently so much trouble if the weapons discharge happened in that safe area that is made just for that?

JD2780
06-05-2013, 09:36 PM
On my first base I was doing SF augmentee duty and we had this shift supervisor that was a pain in the ass. She be on this SF kids for any single thing making their lives very miserable, she just had SSgt put on but she carry herself like she was CSAF. One morning coming into getting our briefing we were getting our weapons and she was loading her M9 on the safe area and had an accidental discharge, it scared the shit out of everyone there. I don't think I ever saw her again in all my days remaining as a augmentee.

The thing I don't understood though was why she got in apparently so much trouble if the weapons discharge happened in that safe area that is made just for that?

Because it still show complacency, and carelessness. I would rather it happen there than any other place.

Psy
06-06-2013, 04:22 PM
Now, on the Army side, NCOs are never supposed to make a monetary bet with any soldier. I like betting for fun, so on range day I put out a bet that nobody could outshoot me, at 5 pushups per hit. When a Junior Enlisted has that rare opportunity to make an NCO push for THEM, they usually take it unless they know something is up. 4 did, and the looks on their faces when the tower called out my name with 39 of 40 hits was priceless. So were the pushups, totaling 70 between them.

What's even funnier here is that the story has spread. Now, any time I go to a range or EST, someone inevitably takes up the challenge. Never yet had to pay up on it, though I had one tie last time. Might have to stop while I'm ahead...

coloringoutsidethelines
06-06-2013, 04:39 PM
Now, on the Army side, NCOs are never supposed to make a monetary bet with any soldier. I like betting for fun, so on range day I put out a bet that nobody could outshoot me, at 5 pushups per hit. When a Junior Enlisted has that rare opportunity to make an NCO push for THEM, they usually take it unless they know something is up. 4 did, and the looks on their faces when the tower called out my name with 39 of 40 hits was priceless. So were the pushups, totaling 70 between them.

What's even funnier here is that the story has spread. Now, any time I go to a range or EST, someone inevitably takes up the challenge. Never yet had to pay up on it, though I had one tie last time. Might have to stop while I'm ahead...

If you were dealing with Airmen they would have combined their shots to hit 129 of 40 and you would have been pushing 450 times.