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BOSS302
05-24-2013, 04:37 AM
Sort of related to the "Retiring OCONUS" thread...

For those of you who were stationed overseas, what value did you get out of it? Did being overseas enlighten you? Did it cause you to take a more objective look at the U.S.? Perhaps it put a dent in any, "USA! USA! USA! We are #1!" feelings? Maybe it made you love the U.S. even more?

OtisRNeedleman
05-24-2013, 04:43 AM
I learned a great deal and appreciated the USA even more when I returned, both times. To be honest, I have no desire to go overseas again.

VFFTSGT
05-24-2013, 04:53 AM
Sort of related to the "Retiring OCONUS" thread...

For those of you who were stationed overseas, what value did you get out of it? Did being overseas enlighten you? Did it cause you to take a more objective look at the U.S.? Perhaps it put a dent in any, "USA! USA! USA! We are #1!" feelings? Maybe it made you love the U.S. even more?

Never been stationed at a "real" overseas assignment...been stationed OCONUS though. I have been deployed to other countries and visited other countries on my own.

I would have to say the experience of something outside 'my bubble' or my 'little world' probably started the shifting in viewpoints that led to where I am today...which is basically what you suggested...the US is not always #1 or always right and that we might have caused some of our own problems or even created some of them for our own self-interests.

BOSS302
05-24-2013, 04:53 AM
Never been stationed at a "real" overseas assignment...been stationed OCONUS though. I have been deployed to other countries and visited other countries on my own.

I would have to say the experience of something outside 'my bubble' or my 'little world' probably started the shifting in viewpoints that led to where I am today...which is basically what you suggested...the US is not always #1 or always right and that we might have caused some of our own problems or even created some of them for our own self-interests.

What does that mean?

eman_osan
05-24-2013, 05:05 AM
I was stationed in Thailand, England, three tours to Korea and been several different countries arouond the world. Each gave me a different outlook on what it is to be an American. England was always the place I wanted to visit as a child, but Asia is in the blood. I can say when it comes to family values compared to Asians, we've Amercans have lost some things over the years. Although I live in Korea, the US will always be home and great place to visit - not sure how long or any particular place I would prefer to live long-term. There are still too many places I want to explore.

VFFTSGT
05-24-2013, 06:00 AM
What does that mean?

Alaska and Hawaii

BOSS302
05-24-2013, 06:04 AM
Alaska and Hawaii


http://25.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_m0yyx7KDiD1roxjp8o1_500.jpg

Robert F. Dorr
05-24-2013, 09:50 AM
Sort of related to the "Retiring OCONUS" thread...

For those of you who were stationed overseas, what value did you get out of it? Did being overseas enlighten you? Did it cause you to take a more objective look at the U.S.? Perhaps it put a dent in any, "USA! USA! USA! We are #1!" feelings? Maybe it made you love the U.S. even more?

As a teenager, the Air Force sent me to do something I would never have requested -- study a foreign language -- and then sent me to a country that had been very big in the news while I was in high school. That led to a lifelong interest in other countries, cultures and languages. I was always proud to be an American and glad that people in other countries respected and admired us even in places where their governments didn't. That part changed forever on January 20, 2001. No one can ever repair the damage of eight years of George W. Bush. We lost that respect and admiration even in the countries that are most inclined to be friendly. If I go abroad again, I won't do anything to publicize the fact that I'm an American.

BOSS302
05-24-2013, 10:14 AM
As a teenager, the Air Force sent me to do something I would never have requested -- study a foreign language -- and then sent me to a country that had been very big in the news while I was in high school. That led to a lifelong interest in other countries, cultures and languages. I was always proud to be an American and glad that people in other countries respected and admired us even in places where their governments didn't. That part changed forever on January 20, 2001. No one can ever repair the damage of eight years of George W. Bush. We lost that respect and admiration even in the countries that are most inclined to be friendly. If I go abroad again, I won't do anything to publicize the fact that I'm an American.

This part might be true. Perhaps that is why President Obama decided to start killing American citizens with drone strikes. Maybe if we all were required to carry so-called "Photo IDs" with us at ALL times, the drones would leave us alone.

AF MUSTANG
05-24-2013, 12:22 PM
I'd have to disagree with you there, Bob. I've been overseas after January 20, 2001...in fact, I'm in the AFRICOM AOR right now. You know what? Africans, that's right Africans, have asked me on several occasions why "we got rid of George Bush for Obama." Go figure! They LOVED Bush. I know it sounds odd, but when you consider what his administration did for the people on this continent, I guess it makes sense.

Full disclosure: I don't believe Bush damaged our standing in the world any more than the current or previous administration. That's a line peddled by Democrats who wanted more power and ultraconservatives who didn't approve of Bush trying to govern from the middle. As far as our world standing is concerned, people who love freedom still love the USA no matter what. As for the others, as the younger generation says, "haters gonna hate."

AF MUSTANG
05-24-2013, 12:29 PM
One more thing, Bob. There is no place on this earth (outside of a hot spot where I'm required to) where I consciously "won't do anything to publicize the fact that I'm an American." Geez!

Mr. Happy
05-24-2013, 12:51 PM
I did six overseas tours (3 ROK, 2 Germany and 1 UK) and I believe without a doubt they made me a better person and broadened my world perspective. When you go to other countries, you can't go with a mindset of looking for all the reasons America is better. Instead, I always tried to appreciate the cultures and the people.

The first two Korea tours were Osan and Kunsan, and as a young troop I think I and a lot of other Americans falsely drew a perception of the Korean people and the country based on what we saw in Aragona Alley and A-Town during a 1 year tour. It wasn't until I went to Taegu for a tour and was more isolated from the typical sleaziness outside other American bases that I saw Korea was actually a beautiful country and the people were friendly. I had more fun at Taegu than the others hands down. I thought the real Korean people, not the trash in the juicey bars, were a warm, friendly and proud people. A lot of people don't realize they fought beside America in Vietnam and their troops were so valiant, the Viet Cong feared them the most.

My first base as a 19 year old was Germany, and at the time, I didn't appreciate the opportunity I had. Basically hung around base all the time, had no vehicle and wasted 2 years (although Gulf War I and a 6 month deployment didn't help matters much). There is so much history and cultures concentrated in Central Europe. As the years went by for my career and as I got older, I started to regret that missed opportunity. So I went back to Germany for another tour and had the time of my life. I stayed almost 4 1/2 years that time. Virtually every chance we had, we would do road trips to nearby villages and explore festivals, castles and other sights. I also admired the hard working nature and pride in quality of the German people. They often seem standoffish when you meet them, but they are very friendly once acquainted.

My other assignment was the United Kingdom, and to be honest, even though we share a common language and our histories are closely tied to each other, I didn't think much of the place. The weather was lousy, the food not so great (except the fish & chips with salt and vinegar) and it didn't help I couldn't stand Lakenheath. I still enjoyed some aspects of the tour though as the beverages in the local pubs tasted wonderful and I was quite fond of "pub crawling". Plus, there was a lot of history and sights there too. And unknown to a lot of Americans serving there, the pike fishing around there was phenomenal! For some reason though, England didn't strike a cord with me and I was eager to leave when the time came...could be Lakenheath the base spoiled it for me.

The only place I ever visited where I despised the people, the country and culture was Saudi Arabia. No one will ever convince me otherwise.

DWWSWWD
05-24-2013, 01:00 PM
Sort of related to the "Retiring OCONUS" thread...

For those of you who were stationed overseas, what value did you get out of it? Did being overseas enlighten you? Did it cause you to take a more objective look at the U.S.? Perhaps it put a dent in any, "USA! USA! USA! We are #1!" feelings? Maybe it made you love the U.S. even more? Yes to all of these things. I've been to 30 or so countries. I am always glad to get home, though I've had some unbelievable experiences. I am definitely not a USA is #1 guy. Though it may be to me, it is within the context of my upbringing and the things that we westerners enjoy. The ability to appreciate other cultures is a constant reinforcement that the measure of winning a war should not be putting everyone in a pair of Levi's and giving them an iPod. Spending billions, and more importantly, the lives of our brothers and sisters, to make countries like ours is a notion that I do not understand.

DWWSWWD
05-24-2013, 01:01 PM
Sort of related to the "Retiring OCONUS" thread...

For those of you who were stationed overseas, what value did you get out of it? Did being overseas enlighten you? Did it cause you to take a more objective look at the U.S.? Perhaps it put a dent in any, "USA! USA! USA! We are #1!" feelings? Maybe it made you love the U.S. even more? Yes to all of these things. I've been to 30 or so countries. I am always glad to get home, though I've had some unbelievable experiences. I am definitely not a USA is #1 guy. Though it may be to me, it is within the context of my upbringing and the things that we westerners enjoy. The ability to appreciate other cultures is a constant reinforcement that the measure of winning a war should not be putting everyone in a pair of Levi's and giving them an iPod. Spending billions, and more importantly, the lives of our brothers and sisters, to make countries like ours is a notion that I do not understand.

Chief_KO
05-24-2013, 06:02 PM
Korea, Portugal (Azores), Germany, France, Qatar, Kuwait, Jordan, Djibouti, Japan (Okinawa). Each were great to see and experience, and all made me appreciate things about America that most would take for granted. The farther you get away from the base, the more real the people are (the same can be said about CONUS bases too). If you are the "Ugly Amercian" you will be (and should be) treated likewise.

imported_Sgt HULK
05-25-2013, 07:32 AM
. No one can ever repair the damage of eight years of George W. Bush. .

You're a moron, Scandal Obama easily did more damage in his first yr. Its almost june time for another cover up

Airborne
05-25-2013, 12:46 PM
As far as if it's worth it, thats up to the individual. There is the typical person that gets there and wonders why there are no 24 hour walmarts and that the roads are too small for his ram 3500 that will never be swayed. But if you go there with an open mind get away from the base and even farther from the community that the base is in, it is an eye opening experience. I was never a "WERE #1!!!" guy but I was even less so once I was there. I did a decade in the UK and was totally ingrained in the culture. You could never leave the island and still have something interesting to do on the weekend.

I had satellite tv and got into a lot of their documentaries. You start to realize how our public school system indoctrinates us to believe that everything was invented, perfected and controlled by Americans, but nothing is farther from the truth. And thats where you get the "we saved your ass in WW2" mentality. You also start to realize how hateful, racist and close minded many Americans after getting to know Europeans.

I also learned how our food and the people in charge would rather make money and kill us than put out a decent product. You go to France and their McDonalds actually tastes good. You go to Italy and their processed junk food is to die for. If your stationed in England they have some of the best strawberries and asparagus you will ever taste. The best steak I had was in a crumbling village in Croatia. Not that it was big and marbled, but it was grass fed and aged well. And thats the norm, not the top shelf. Never been to Asia, but Im sure the experience is similar.
If you have kids over 5 or so, do a four year tour or more. They will be more well rounded than their peers.

It has permanently changed some of my thought processes. I no longer think big trucks or cars are awesome and I prefer a stick shift. I still make recipes that I grew to like over there like indian cuisine, crepes, and eton mess. All my old British neighbors grew vegetables during the summer and I do too now. I no longer think socialism is a bad word. I hate commercials on tv. I think our bread is too sweet. I always appreciated how "fast" politics worked over there. When the people protested laws changed. I could go on and on. Even if you hate, you will get something out of it.

BOSS302
05-25-2013, 01:59 PM
I always appreciated how "fast" politics worked over there. When the people protested laws changed. I could go on and on. Even if you hate, you will get something out of it.

You were on a roll until this part.

Airborne
05-25-2013, 02:41 PM
You were on a roll until this part.

Why do you disagree? I even put fast in quotes as to give me some leeway.

Mcjohn1118
05-25-2013, 02:43 PM
As a teenager, the Air Force sent me to do something I would never have requested -- study a foreign language -- and then sent me to a country that had been very big in the news while I was in high school. That led to a lifelong interest in other countries, cultures and languages. I was always proud to be an American and glad that people in other countries respected and admired us even in places where their governments didn't. That part changed forever on January 20, 2001. No one can ever repair the damage of eight years of George W. Bush. We lost that respect and admiration even in the countries that are most inclined to be friendly. If I go abroad again, I won't do anything to publicize the fact that I'm an American.
Mr. Dorr, I can't prove or disprove your thoughts on President Bush because I do not have first hand knowledge on how other country's citizens feel about the USA. Do you? And I am not talking about what is read in the overseas newspapers or seen on overseas news channels. I think we can all agree that news is slanted and may not present the real picture. What I am talking about is first hand knowledge from the citizens. Do some countries have disdain for us? Of course. Can we put the entire blame on Bush? I don't know. What I do know is that every administration has had damaging foreign policy. I wasn't alive after WWII, but I'd be willing to bet that Japanese citizens weren't too happy with the Truman administration for dropping the atomic bomb on them...twice. How far into the future did our country blame that administration for the horrible foreign relations we had with Japan? And you also state you were always proud to be an American but that was changed forever after 20 Jan 2001. Were you proud after President Clinton launched 79 tomahawk cruise missiles into Sudan and Afghanistan? I'm sure they loved and respected us after that? Here is a quote from Charles Smith from his article from 1998 (link below):
"First, the missile strike brought a sudden wave of Islamic hatred for the U.S. This was predictable, and will be very costly. The diplomatic and street protests are a reflection of Islamic polling, and right now Bill Clinton’s numbers are not too good. There will be a surge in volunteers and money for several terrorist groups from both ordinary citizens and several oil rich governments. The surge will appear in the form of more suicide bombings, killings and airliner hijackings aimed at America."

http://www.wnd.com/1998/08/7010/

JD2780
05-26-2013, 01:40 AM
As a teenager, the Air Force sent me to do something I would never have requested -- study a foreign language -- and then sent me to a country that had been very big in the news while I was in high school. That led to a lifelong interest in other countries, cultures and languages. I was always proud to be an American and glad that people in other countries respected and admired us even in places where their governments didn't. That part changed forever on January 20, 2001. No one can ever repair the damage of eight years of George W. Bush. We lost that respect and admiration even in the countries that are most inclined to be friendly. If I go abroad again, I won't do anything to publicize the fact that I'm an American.

Yea but somebody can certainly make it worse, like somebody has been. We've lost even more respect since he has gone on his apology tour.

BOSS302
05-26-2013, 02:07 PM
Before living in Europe, I was the typical American car driver. I'd hop in the car and drive to the store even if it was only a few blocks away. Waste of fuel. Being in Europe opened me up to bicycling and public transport because both are embraced and encouraged. When home in the US on leave, I am actually discouraged by the lack of pedestrian sidewalks, lack of GOOD public transport, and the hostile cycling environment. I hate having to drive everywhere.

FLAPS, USAF (ret)
05-26-2013, 05:46 PM
I hate having to drive everywhere.

Must be that Mustang gas mileage?

RobotChicken
05-26-2013, 11:01 PM
:clock:car:lol:lol

BOSS302
05-27-2013, 01:20 AM
Must be that Mustang gas mileage?

Mustang gets best mileage in its class...which isn't saying a lot. The BOSS 302 fares only slightly worse, which is great with how modded the engine is. But driving a Mustang and worrying about MPG is moot. The next-gen Mustang is rumored to pack a dual-turbo-boosted (EcoBoost) V6 - much like the current SHO Taurus - that will give it better performance than the current V8 with its Coyote engine. It will be interesting to see what Ford does with its small-block V8s to keep them top of the class...there is no way one can let a V6 outdo a V8.

Then it'd REALLY feel like it is Europe....

Back when I was still doing the "drive everywhere" bit, I had my F-150 - worse than a Mustang with fuel.

BOSS302
05-27-2013, 01:41 AM
200 German horses will always out-run (and out-corner) 400 American horses :usa2

RobotChicken
05-27-2013, 02:04 AM
:clock:lol:car NOT when you put a 4-bolt main 350 in a 3 series beemer conv and out run the Polizi..:closed_2

BOSS302
05-27-2013, 10:26 AM
I had my first "free range egg" in England several years ago. For anyone unfamiliar with "free range eggs", they are eggs laid by hens who are not kept prisoner in a battery farm and force-fed processed animal feed. They are free to roam about and eat a natural diet of worms, bugs, and whatever it is that hens eat.

The shell is brown and slightly thicker as opposed to white and brittle; the egg white is a bit creamier and stockier than the eggs one would find in the U.S.; and the egg yolk is a rich orange in color as opposed to the tired yellow found in battery-farmed hen eggs.

Even British "junk food" is amazing; I tried a bag of Walker's Crisps "Bacon flavour" and was hooked.

loggie94
05-31-2013, 10:00 AM
I have been blessed with the chance to take the family around the world on various assigmnents in Asia and Europe and of course, spent some quality solo time in a variety of middle-eastern countries. We've lived in 3 other countries (+2 for me on remotes) and visited over a dozen more.

When preparing to move the family from their designated location (I was on a remote tour prior to this), a sweet neighbor lady asked my 7 year old if he'd been on an airplane before. He looked her in the eye and said "Yes, ma'am...I havea Delta frequent flyer account and I have one on United and Alaska Air" She then confessed to him that she'd only flown once back in 1962.

We have seen and experienced some amazing things that, as a child, I could only read about. We've seen graffiti older than our county and been where the Roman ruins are the 'new' ones. It hasn't lessened our love of the USA, but has certainly opened our eyes to a wide spectrum of lifestyles, politics, religion, and community that we'd have never fully experienced in the US.

I wouldn't trade any of it for the world...(well, except time in Saudi...I'd give most of that back).

Sergeant eNYgma
05-31-2013, 02:51 PM
Was waiting for Bush name to come up.................

CYBERFX1024
05-31-2013, 03:33 PM
I have lived in numerous different countries around the world and been to many more. All of it has helped broaden my thinking about the world and America in general. I know most of the world loves us and what we do for the world. Yeah they do have differences in opinions about things, but for the most part they love us. We have led the world from a show of power. Right now the world is losing respect for America due to Obama apologizing for everything we have ever done. He is trying to lead from a position of weakness and the rest of the world sees this as well.

I have made many good friends from almost every corner of the globe. I have learned what being a "dumb american" means and I can't stand them at all. When you travel to a country, you conform it. Not they conform to you. The USA as a whole has the lowest percentage of people that don't have passports and never been outside of the country in the first world. Which is pretty sad.

I thank God everyday for being born in the United States. Here you have homeless people who receive more food than alot of people in the rest of the world.

BOSS302
06-02-2013, 02:28 AM
Living in Britain and spending extended periods of time in France & Italy also showed me the vast differences between the U.S. and these countries in terms of "customer service." The customer is definitely NOT always right and British business, for instance, is not afraid to say so. I did a lot of my shopping off base in places like Bury St. Edmunds, Cambridge, and Norwich; there were times when I'd have to return something. It's not the process that's difficult - if you have the receipt, you're fine - but it's the personalities behind the counter. When I returned some shirts I had purchased because they did not fit (and I had been too silly to try them on before I bought them), the lady said to me, "Well that was rather thick of you...next time you will try them on before you purchase, yeah?" I couldn't imagine that scenario happening in a U.S. department store. But I was not offended...I actually found it to be funny and we both laughed (at my expense).

I also do not like paying their TV Tax in the UK; I do not watch TV and I have no cable hook-up. Yet I was ignorant of the finer details of the system; if you have ANYTHING in your house that COULD be used to watch TV either through the airwaves, a cable hook-up, satellite, Internet, etc...you must pay. It is reimbursable, but I was being stubborn. I got the threatening letters in the post and my British colleagues said to ignore them, they never follow up. Well, they followed up after a year; a man from the TV Tax office showed up on my doorstep and gave me two options: (1) pay the tax on the spot, (2) receive a fixed penalty on the spot and a summons to court. He wasn't nice about it at all and it worked...I paid on the spot and every year thereafter =)

I found Germany to be more like the U.S. when it comes to customer service...

RobotChicken
06-02-2013, 07:41 AM
:car As you all know; in Germany they like ALL things in ORDER and CORRECT! 'Machine666' will love this $hit...US Passport, German Drivers Licence(For Life) Mazda (nippon) with Czech plates Military ID, and drive to Czechoslovakia for american cigs and booze,gas, cheaper then on base with a ration card!! Plus spend the weekend partying with Fine LADIES,2 days at hotel, .05 cents for a liter of Real BEER in Pilsner, Real Bud(God is it good) .25 cents for a real vodka....and Still had money left sunday night when I got back to Graf!! (out of 50 bucks) :outtahere::banana::very_drunk::beerchug::smoker2:

BOSS302
06-02-2013, 02:50 PM
:car As you all know; in Germany they like ALL things in ORDER and CORRECT! 'Machine666' will love this $hit...US Passport, German Drivers Licence(For Life) Mazda (nippon) with Czech plates Military ID, and drive to Czechoslovakia for american cigs and booze,gas, cheaper then on base with a ration card!! Plus spend the weekend partying with Fine LADIES,2 days at hotel, .05 cents for a liter of Real BEER in Pilsner, Real Bud(God is it good) .25 cents for a real vodka....and Still had money left sunday night when I got back to Graf!! (out of 50 bucks) :outtahere::banana::very_drunk::beerchug::smoker2:

Must be nice. The only places left like that in Europe are Poland, Lithuania, Estonia, and others of a similar feather. I spent a weekend in Poland with 200 Euro and came back with money still left from that little wad of spending cash. I spent more on the budget airline plane ticket than I did on a weekend of bars, clubs, and restaurants.

TJMAC77SP
06-02-2013, 06:07 PM
As a teenager, the Air Force sent me to do something I would never have requested -- study a foreign language -- and then sent me to a country that had been very big in the news while I was in high school. That led to a lifelong interest in other countries, cultures and languages. I was always proud to be an American and glad that people in other countries respected and admired us even in places where their governments didn't. That part changed forever on January 20, 2001. No one can ever repair the damage of eight years of George W. Bush. We lost that respect and admiration even in the countries that are most inclined to be friendly. If I go abroad again, I won't do anything to publicize the fact that I'm an American.

See post above (#7).

- - - Updated - - -


Was waiting for Bush name to come up.................

Bob will NEVER let you down in that regard.

Sergeant eNYgma
06-03-2013, 01:06 PM
See post above (#7).

- - - Updated - - -



Bob will NEVER let you down in that regard.

Apparently not...I overslept my alarm by 5 minutes this morning...wonder what Bush had to do with that?

JD2780
06-03-2013, 01:33 PM
Apparently not...I overslept my alarm by 5 minutes this morning...wonder what Bush had to do with that?

Everything. It's always Bush's fault.

Back to the oconus thing. Yes Hawaii is oconus, if you've lived in Hawaii it's got a vibe of a different country. It's crazy.

BOSS302
06-03-2013, 01:54 PM
it's got a vibe of a different country. It's crazy.

So does West Virginia.

JD2780
06-03-2013, 02:06 PM
So does West Virginia.

Never been, but I don't doubt it.

RobotChicken
06-03-2013, 06:46 PM
:hat "Trust us,IT DOES!!!

eman_osan
06-03-2013, 11:42 PM
I had a ball in Saudi Arabia - pre-Gulf War 1.

QUOTE=loggie94;629242]I have been blessed with the chance to take the family around the world on various assigmnents in Asia and Europe and of course, spent some quality solo time in a variety of middle-eastern countries. We've lived in 3 other countries (+2 for me on remotes) and visited over a dozen more.

When preparing to move the family from their designated location (I was on a remote tour prior to this), a sweet neighbor lady asked my 7 year old if he'd been on an airplane before. He looked her in the eye and said "Yes, ma'am...I havea Delta frequent flyer account and I have one on United and Alaska Air" She then confessed to him that she'd only flown once back in 1962.

We have seen and experienced some amazing things that, as a child, I could only read about. We've seen graffiti older than our county and been where the Roman ruins are the 'new' ones. It hasn't lessened our love of the USA, but has certainly opened our eyes to a wide spectrum of lifestyles, politics, religion, and community that we'd have never fully experienced in the US.

I wouldn't trade any of it for the world...(well, except time in Saudi...I'd give most of that back).[/QUOTE]

loggie94
06-04-2013, 06:05 AM
Eman -- What little I saw of Saudi wasn't bad... my two trips into Riyad to escape the square-mile prison-like compound known as Prince Sultan Air Base. So, I guess it isn't fair to judge the whole country by time there.

However, aside from the dumbassery self-imposed by the AF, my worst experience with the locals was daily dealings with the customs folks assigned to the base to defend Allah's turf from the heathen Americans. Bandar the customs chief was a hypocrite of the worst form. His inspectors spent 72 hours at work (mostly sleeping) and then 72 hours off (mostly in Bahrain, where Allah couldn't see their transgressions).

JD2780
06-04-2013, 11:32 AM
Eman -- What little I saw of Saudi wasn't bad... my two trips into Riyad to escape the square-mile prison-like compound known as Prince Sultan Air Base. So, I guess it isn't fair to judge the whole country by time there.

However, aside from the dumbassery self-imposed by the AF, my worst experience with the locals was daily dealings with the customs folks assigned to the base to defend Allah's turf from the heathen Americans. Bandar the customs chief was a hypocrite of the worst form. His inspectors spent 72 hours at work (mostly sleeping) and then 72 hours off (mostly in Bahrain, where Allah couldn't see their transgressions).

When hanging out in AUAB a few of us drove into Doha and it was interesting. I did have trouble relaxing though. I had never been into a middle eastern country without my weapon, vest, additional armor. I heard the call to prayer which reminded of a couple ambushes we had been in before, they used the loud speakers to tell folks our positions, hearing the folks in the market yelling in Arabic also kept me on edge. Until I literally sat down and took deep breath I wasn't actually enjoying myself. After taking those measures I did enjoy it. Good food, good people, granted they may have been nice because I was spending money.

This wasn't an assignment, just passing through on my way to afghaniland.

JD2780
06-04-2013, 12:04 PM
JD -- I know the feeling. Qatar, Kuwait and Iraq are very similar and I had more than a couple flashbacks to the roads of Iraq (from '05) while in Kuwait last year.

Yea, it was crappy because I didn't get to fully enjoy myself until half way through our adventure into town.

loggie94
06-04-2013, 12:07 PM
JD -- I know the feeling. Qatar, Kuwait and Iraq are very similar and I had more than a couple flashbacks to the roads of Iraq (from '05) while in Kuwait last year.

JD2780
06-04-2013, 12:14 PM
JD -- I know the feeling. Qatar, Kuwait and Iraq are very similar and I had more than a couple flashbacks to the roads of Iraq (from '05) while in Kuwait last year.

Yea, it was crappy because I didn't get to fully enjoy myself until half way through our adventure into town.

eman_osan
06-05-2013, 03:11 AM
I was there long before PSAB was built. Eskan Village was under construction as a palace for one of the royal family when they gave it to the US military for our use. I understand how god forsaken it would be out in the middle ot the dessert. Riyadh was rocking back then with the tea runs to the embassy compound and several of the private companies in the area. Use to go to the O-3 compound and purchase pork ribs at the commissary for our Filipino chef to cook back at the hotel. We stayed in the Al Yamama Hotel which was not too far from Al Shula Mall in Riyadh.

I used to work customs at King Khalid airport and know how terrible the Saudis were. To the infidels be damned. We had a SSgt come in from Barksdale with a bottle of booze in his luggage and was shipped out the same day with the hardcopy Article 15 in hand. A flash copy was sent to his wing commander. If the dumb a__ would have let us check his bags, he would have been ok.


Eman -- What little I saw of Saudi wasn't bad... my two trips into Riyad to escape the square-mile prison-like compound known as Prince Sultan Air Base. So, I guess it isn't fair to judge the whole country by time there.

However, aside from the dumbassery self-imposed by the AF, my worst experience with the locals was daily dealings with the customs folks assigned to the base to defend Allah's turf from the heathen Americans. Bandar the customs chief was a hypocrite of the worst form. His inspectors spent 72 hours at work (mostly sleeping) and then 72 hours off (mostly in Bahrain, where Allah couldn't see their transgressions).

BOSS302
06-05-2013, 03:14 AM
I used to work customs at King Khalid airport and know how terrible the Saudis were. To the infidels be damned. We had a SSgt come in from Barksdale with a bottle of booze in his luggage and was shipped out the same day with the hardcopy Article 15 in hand. A flash copy was sent to his wing commander. If the dumb a__ would have let us check his bags, he would have been ok.

I'm not sure if it is one of those "base legends" or if it is truth, but during my last stint in Qatar we heard of an entire C-17 aircrew being given the boot by Qatari authorities during their intro because the aircrew gave them attitude and the Qatari officials would have none of it. (Edit...if it is true, makes me wonder who the hell flew the C-17 home...)

Those Qatari customs/immigrations officials must be well-connected or something. Are they members of the royal family? Or just the Qatari-equivalent of high-class? Does anyone remember seeing them drive their new-style Camaros, H2 Hummers, and giant F-150s to the PAX terminal? For about a week, one of them was driving a powder-blue Lamborghini. I guess he got tired of all the American guys taking pictures with it outside the little "Q-Turn" grab-n-go because we never saw it again after that week.

RobotChicken
06-05-2013, 03:37 AM
:carBlue looks better on you 'BOSS302'!

BOSS302
06-05-2013, 10:08 AM
:carBlue looks better on you 'BOSS302'!

BOSS 302 looks great in "Grabber Blue." It also looks disgusting in "Gotta Have It Green." I also wish Ford would just call their colors "Blue" and "Green" instead of sourcing their names from 13 year-old kids.

Greg
06-05-2013, 11:27 AM
BOSS 302 looks great in "Grabber Blue." It also looks disgusting in "Gotta Have It Green." I also wish Ford would just call their colors "Blue" and "Green" instead of sourcing their names from 13 year-old kids.

A friend of mine bought new an '89 5.0 HO, 4-speed, w/moon roof in "hot strawberry." A real neck-snapper.

BOSS302
06-05-2013, 12:21 PM
A friend of mine bought new an '89 5.0 HO, 4-speed, w/moon roof in "hot strawberry." A real neck-snapper.

The 87-93 Mustang "5.0s" were a treat. They were light, inexpensive for what they offer (as Mustangs still are today), and fairly dependable. A big issue with that generation of 5.0s is that the differential housing will develop leaks. It's interesting; that generation of "5.0s" had an engine size closer to 4.7L. But it isn't exactly marketable to put "4.7" on the side, so Ford was generous and rounded up. The current generation of "5.0s" have an engine size of 4.99L, so "5.0" applies more aptly.

Today's 5.0 has a great engine in the Coyote line. It has the best HP-to-weight ratio in its class and that's why, despite being a small-block 5.0, can beat the pants off 6.2L Camaros and 7.1L HEMI Challengers.

Having said that, being in Europe made me appreciate the advantages of "Euro-Tuning" over big, burly V8s. Even on straight-line 1/4 mile tracks, I was barely beating these little V4 and V6 Volkswagens and BMWs. It wasn't until I souped up my engine and took some weight out of the body (aluminum shaft, after market suspension, etc) that the raw horsepower finally had a distinct advantage.

However, being in Germany and the UK and actually going on tracks and circuits with turns and bends...no way. European cars destroy American muscle in that regard. I recall Motor Trend testing the Mustang 5.0 against the BMW M3 and stating that the 5.0 handled better than the M3. Yeah, right. What were they smoking?