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garhkal
04-08-2013, 04:37 AM
Should press shield laws be involate, or have limitations.. Currently in Colorado one judge is trying to force a reporter to give up their confidential informant that "leaked" info related to the theatre shooting.. using the justification that the info is directly related to the case so the "press shield" should not apply..

Banned
04-08-2013, 07:47 AM
Absolutely not. The key part of a free press is that they can and will use leaked information... if reporters can be forced under threat of prosecution to give up their sources' identities... that basically destroys the entire concept of journalism.

Though in some peoples' minds - the government's unrestricted ability to deal with "threats" has higher priority over the people's access to accurate information about the actions of the government, military, and large companies.

Steve45213
04-09-2013, 04:40 PM
I'm all for "shield laws." If they are not in place, sources will not talk to reporters. If sources don't talk to reporters, the press can't function as a the watchdog of democracy it is supposed to be.

sandsjames
04-09-2013, 05:30 PM
Shield laws are there for a reason.

The only issue I'm on the fence about (and this may already be included in the law) is if the information will lead to protect someone who is in imminent danger. The problem is that imminent danger is subjective and the can of worms is open.

JD2780
04-09-2013, 06:34 PM
JB what about in regards to classified information? Should the press be protected then? I understand what your're saying about the press, and them needing people willing to leak stuff. They also need the protection afforded to them. Just curious as to the handling of classified infomation might change it.

Greg
04-09-2013, 08:05 PM
Shield laws are there for a reason.

The only issue I'm on the fence about (and this may already be included in the law) is if the information will lead to protect someone who is in imminent danger. The problem is that imminent danger is subjective and the can of worms is open.

Au contraire mon ami, I'm partially through an assignment where one of the essay questions concerns National Association of Social Workers, and its Code of Ethics. A professional social worker has a moral, and ethical, obligation to report a situation if there is a client, or another individual, in imminent danger.

Yes, shield laws protect social workers, as well as journalists.

JD2780
04-09-2013, 08:05 PM
Au contraire mon ami, I'm partially through an assignment where one of the essay questions concerns National Association of Social Workers, and its Code of Ethics. A professional social worker has a moral, and ethical obligation to report a situation if there is a client, or another individual, in imminent danger.

Yes, shield laws protect social workers, as well as journalists.

I believe Docs are required to report where somebody may harm somebody else or themselves.

sandsjames
04-09-2013, 08:12 PM
Au contraire mon ami, I'm partially through an assignment where one of the essay questions concerns National Association of Social Workers, and its Code of Ethics. A professional social worker has a moral, and ethical, obligation to report a situation if there is a client, or another individual, in imminent danger.

Yes, shield laws protect social workers, as well as journalists.

Thanks. I wasn't sure. That's kind of the problem. There is always some exception and that exception becomes subjective, which is when our rights end up getting taken advantage of.

Greg
04-09-2013, 08:25 PM
Thanks. I wasn't sure. That's kind of the problem. There is always some exception and that exception becomes subjective, which is when our rights end up getting taken advantage of.

Just "googled" this:

"Reamer (2003) offers four guidelines to help clinicians balance the professional obligation of confidentiality with the duties to warn (and protect):
First, the social worker should have evidence that the client poses a threat of violence to a third party.... Second, the social worker should have evidence that the violent act is foreseeable.... Third, the social worker should have evidence that the violent act is imminent.... Finally...a practitioner must be able to identify the probable victim. The disclosure of confidential information against a client’s wishes should not occur unless the social worker has specific information about the client’s apparent intent (pp. 38-39)."

http://www.socialworker.com/home/Feature_Articles/Ethics/Confidentiality_%26_the_Duty_to_Warn%3A_Ethical_an d_Legal_Implications_for_the_Therapeutic_Relations hip/

sandsjames
04-09-2013, 08:27 PM
Just "googled" this:

"Reamer (2003) offers four guidelines to help clinicians balance the professional obligation of confidentiality with the duties to warn (and protect):
First, the social worker should have evidence that the client poses a threat of violence to a third party.... Second, the social worker should have evidence that the violent act is foreseeable.... Third, the social worker should have evidence that the violent act is imminent.... Finally...a practitioner must be able to identify the probable victim. The disclosure of confidential information against a client’s wishes should not occur unless the social worker has specific information about the client’s apparent intent (pp. 38-39)."

http://www.socialworker.com/home/Feature_Articles/Ethics/Confidentiality_%26_the_Duty_to_Warn%3A_Ethical_an d_Legal_Implications_for_the_Therapeutic_Relations hip/

Google? What's that? (RFD reference).

I wonder if it is this specific for journalists.

sandsjames
04-09-2013, 08:27 PM
Just "googled" this:

"Reamer (2003) offers four guidelines to help clinicians balance the professional obligation of confidentiality with the duties to warn (and protect):
First, the social worker should have evidence that the client poses a threat of violence to a third party.... Second, the social worker should have evidence that the violent act is foreseeable.... Third, the social worker should have evidence that the violent act is imminent.... Finally...a practitioner must be able to identify the probable victim. The disclosure of confidential information against a client’s wishes should not occur unless the social worker has specific information about the client’s apparent intent (pp. 38-39)."

http://www.socialworker.com/home/Feature_Articles/Ethics/Confidentiality_%26_the_Duty_to_Warn%3A_Ethical_an d_Legal_Implications_for_the_Therapeutic_Relations hip/

Google? What's that? (RFD reference).

I wonder if it is this specific for journalists.