PDA

View Full Version : The needs of the Air Force...



Shadowless
03-25-2013, 06:35 PM
I am currently in Korea and I am going to apply to have my follow on canceled. I love Korea and I want to move to another assignment in Korea after my current assignment is up. One of the boxes ask me to give a reason on why I want to cancel my follow on and how it will benefit the needs of the Air Force.

I was wondering if anyone could give me some good suggestions on what to type in the box, I have 4,000 words or less to fill in and I am having writers block like never before. If anyone has any good advice or words please let me know. I know by staying in Korea I would save the Air Force time, money and training but other then that I am drawing a blank.

Thank you very one in advance for your help.

JD2780
03-25-2013, 06:59 PM
I am currently in Korea and I am going to apply to have my follow on canceled. I love Korea and I want to move to another assignment in Korea after my current assignment is up. One of the boxes ask me to give a reason on why I want to cancel my follow on and how it will benefit the needs of the Air Force.

I was wondering if anyone could give me some good suggestions on what to type in the box, I have 4,000 words or less to fill in and I am having writers block like never before. If anyone has any good advice or words please let me know. I know by staying in Korea I would save the Air Force time, money and training but other then that I am drawing a blank.

Thank you very one in advance for your help.

Figure out the cost of PCS'ing yourself to another base then bringing somebody else in. You'd be saving money in a very fiscally constrained time. Or you can say because Chuck Norris said so.

Shadowless
03-25-2013, 07:48 PM
Figure out the cost of PCS'ing yourself to another base then bringing somebody else in. You'd be saving money in a very fiscally constrained time. Or you can say because Chuck Norris said so.

Great tip, thanks.

Robert F. Dorr
03-25-2013, 07:54 PM
I am currently in Korea and I am going to apply to have my follow on canceled. I love Korea and I want to move to another assignment in Korea after my current assignment is up. One of the boxes ask me to give a reason on why I want to cancel my follow on and how it will benefit the needs of the Air Force.

I was wondering if anyone could give me some good suggestions on what to type in the box, I have 4,000 words or less to fill in and I am having writers block like never before. If anyone has any good advice or words please let me know. I know by staying in Korea I would save the Air Force time, money and training but other then that I am drawing a blank.

Thank you very one in advance for your help.

The catch is, your boss doesn't really benefit simply because an action benefits the Air Force. If you're really going to use up 4,000 words, be sure to put your main points in the first couple of sentences. In fact, your first sentence should summarize everything to follow. Be sure to use short paragraphs. Maybe it might be okay, in addition to savings in money, time, and effort, to say something modest about your own sense of well-being.

Shadowless
03-25-2013, 07:58 PM
The catch is, your boss doesn't really benefit simply because an action benefits the Air Force. If you're really going to use up 4,000 words, be sure to put your main points in the first couple of sentences. In fact, your first sentence should summarize everything to follow. Be sure to use short paragraphs. Maybe it might be okay, in addition to savings in money, time, and effort, to say something modest about your own sense of well-being.

Thanks for the advice, I was also going to be honest and say how much I love Korea and that by moving to another location in Korea I would help the Air Force by gaining new experience but also keeping the continuity of have already serving in Korea for a year.

OtisRNeedleman
03-25-2013, 08:05 PM
Figure out the cost of PCS'ing yourself to another base then bringing somebody else in. You'd be saving money in a very fiscally constrained time. Or you can say because Chuck Norris said so. Agree the monetary savings should be heavily emphasized. Don't say how much you like Korea; someone at MPC will then make sure you go to Minot. You could say you enjoy being part of the most dynamic mission in today's AF. But above all emphasize the cost savings to the AF. Everything else comes later, and you shouldn't need 4000 words to do it.

imported_KnuckleDragger
03-25-2013, 11:27 PM
Just make sure you start a new thread, during every step of the process:noidea

imported_chipotleboy
03-26-2013, 12:58 PM
In addition to the saving money angle, you could also mention this could save the assignment team from having to nonvolunteer someone for the assignment.

JD2780
03-26-2013, 01:17 PM
Another good angle!! I bet the AF denies it although he has got plenty of good reasons.

CrustySMSgt
03-26-2013, 01:17 PM
Thanks for the advice, I was also going to be honest and say how much I love Korea and that by moving to another location in Korea I would help the Air Force by gaining new experience but also keeping the continuity of have already serving in Korea for a year.

As Otis said, DO NOT reference "how much you like Korea!!!" You've got great advice already, highlight the cost savings to leave you in place (though if you think it through, they'll have to send someone to your follow-on location, so it REALLY isn't that big a saving). You've got continuity (assuming you'll be filling a similar position) on your side, as well as highlighting how the move will make you a better Airman and NCO, and (insert AFSC).

And DON'T ramble on for 4000 words. Keep it short, sweet, and to the point. You're not the first person to want to stay in Korea, so they've seen it all before.

JD2780
03-26-2013, 01:18 PM
Another good angle!! I bet the AF denies it although he has got plenty of good reasons.

CrustySMSgt
03-26-2013, 01:18 PM
Thanks for the advice, I was also going to be honest and say how much I love Korea and that by moving to another location in Korea I would help the Air Force by gaining new experience but also keeping the continuity of have already serving in Korea for a year.

As Otis said, DO NOT reference "how much you like Korea!!!" You've got great advice already, highlight the cost savings to leave you in place (though if you think it through, they'll have to send someone to your follow-on location, so it REALLY isn't that big a saving). You've got continuity (assuming you'll be filling a similar position) on your side, as well as highlighting how the move will make you a better Airman and NCO, and (insert AFSC).

And DON'T ramble on for 4000 words. Keep it short, sweet, and to the point. You're not the first person to want to stay in Korea, so they've seen it all before.

BRUWIN
03-26-2013, 02:14 PM
I once used the reason "this place will fail without me" but they sent me packing so don't use that one.

XxATCxX
03-26-2013, 02:46 PM
With all the rhetoric from the DPRK, it is a good idea to keep an Airman in place who is familiar with the area and already spun up as opposed to someone new coming in who will need however long to gain the same knowledge you currently possess.

thread_cop
03-26-2013, 02:58 PM
Just tell them the truth. You've met a "juicy" and she does some freaky stuff to you that American women would never dream of so you want another year of it before you decide whether or not you're going to bring her back to the "Big BX".

Robert F. Dorr
03-26-2013, 09:55 PM
Just tell them the truth. You've met a "juicy" and she does some freaky stuff to you that American women would never dream of so you want another year of it before you decide whether or not you're going to bring her back to the "Big BX".

That was a given from the first post.

Shadowless
03-27-2013, 10:15 AM
That was a given from the first post.

I just love everything about Korea and I don't think a year is long enough to get what I want out of it.

BRUWIN
03-27-2013, 10:44 AM
I just love everything about Korea and I don't think a year is long enough to get what I want out of it.

Seriously...I never really thought they cared whatever reason you put down. The bottom line is that if it suits them for you to stay they will make it happen. For instance, if they have a non-vol scheduled to replace you that has been non-voled before than they just might make it happen. I know my career field would do anything they could to reduce non-vol assignments.

Keep in mind...if they have to cancel someone else (volunteer) that already has orders to go so you can stay and it creates a domino effect than they might just shoot it down no matter how good the reason because it will mean additional work for AFPC. Now AFPC will never say that but I always highly suspected it. AFPC'ers can chime in anytime.

Shadowless
03-29-2013, 12:36 AM
Seriously...I never really thought they cared whatever reason you put down. The bottom line is that if it suits them for you to stay they will make it happen. For instance, if they have a non-vol scheduled to replace you that has been non-voled before than they just might make it happen. I know my career field would do anything they could to reduce non-vol assignments.

Keep in mind...if they have to cancel someone else (volunteer) that already has orders to go so you can stay and it creates a domino effect than they might just shoot it down no matter how good the reason because it will mean additional work for AFPC. Now AFPC will never say that but I always highly suspected it. AFPC'ers can chime in anytime.

Thanks for the help, I appreciate it. A co worker of mine who is trying to do the same thing just got his follow on canceled so it is possible. I am currently trying to get with him to figure out exactly what he put as his justification for canceling his follow on though.

Robert F. Dorr
03-29-2013, 01:46 AM
I just love everything about Korea and I don't think a year is long enough to get what I want out of it.

How I felt, too. Did two consecutive Korea tours in the AF (1958-60), visited when traveling as an author (1963), was there at the embassy (1967-69) and visited again as an author (1999). Also worked on Korean issues in Washington with occasional trips to Korea (1970-72 and 1975-79). Probably would not enjoy living at Osan today and wonder if it was a good idea to have accompanied tours there. Would like to see North Korea from some perspective other than looking down from the air.

Robert F. Dorr
03-29-2013, 01:48 AM
How I felt, too. Did two consecutive Korea tours in the AF (1958-60), visited when traveling as an author (1963), was there at the embassy (1967-69) and visited again as an author (1999). Also worked on Korean issues in Washington with occasional trips to Korea (1970-72 and 1975-79). Probably would not enjoy living at Osan today and wonder if it was a good idea to have accompanied tours there. Would like to see North Korea from some perspective other than looking down from the air.

Must add, though that liked living in Japan especially in Fukuoka (1973-74) when there were almost no Americans to be found in the city. Japanese people and language more complex but were always friendly.

Mcjohn1118
03-29-2013, 12:48 PM
Must add, though that liked living in Japan especially in Fukuoka (1973-74) when there were almost no Americans to be found in the city. Japanese people and language more complex but were always friendly.

Mr. Dorr, if you want to see North Korea you'll have to be a former NBA (National Baketball Association, just in case you didn't know) star, or become friends with one named Dennis Rodman. Apparently, him and the Supreme Leader are best friends now. I mean Dennis was able to go to North Korea and hang with Kim Jong-Un. Wait, I think President Carter went there a few years ago as well. If you know the former president, see if you can hitch a ride with him. If all else fails, start a petition on the White House web-site allowing you to go. All you need is 100,000 e-signatures and the White House has to provide an answer. In all seriousness, if you do ever get to go, I encourage you to write about it. I would buy your book.

Robert F. Dorr
03-31-2013, 12:53 AM
Mr. Dorr, if you want to see North Korea you'll have to be a former NBA (National Baketball Association, just in case you didn't know) star, or become friends with one named Dennis Rodman. Apparently, him and the Supreme Leader are best friends now. I mean Dennis was able to go to North Korea and hang with Kim Jong-Un. Wait, I think President Carter went there a few years ago as well. If you know the former president, see if you can hitch a ride with him. If all else fails, start a petition on the White House web-site allowing you to go. All you need is 100,000 e-signatures and the White House has to provide an answer. In all seriousness, if you do ever get to go, I encourage you to write about it. I would buy your book.

We forget today that in years past no one from the West, but no one, traveled to North Korea. That's what it was like when I was North Korea watcher in the State Department (1970-72 and 1976-79). One day, a western journalist made it to Pyongyang. At that time, that was very unusual and we devoted a lot of effort to debriefing him when he got back. Then as now, however, the best way to understand the North Koreans was to read their speeches, statements and media. The U.S. government has been congenitally lazy about doing this.

Thank you for your offer to buy my future book, "In with Kim, or: How I Stopped Worrying and Learned to Love Pyongyang." Unfortunately, even if Kim Jong-Un sent an engraved invitation -- or better yet, his personal Tupolev Tu-154 -- I would have to decline the opportunity. For a variety of reasons, of which my aversion to so-called "photo ID" is only one, I'm not able to travel. I would have loved to be a fly on the wall when Dennis Rodman and the Supreme Leader were getting it on.

RobotChicken
03-31-2013, 03:31 AM
:clock Even with all your language skills, you still wouldn't be able to understand either one of 'em. Me either. :tape :doh

Capt Alfredo
03-31-2013, 09:33 PM
We forget today that in years past no one from the West, but no one, traveled to North Korea. That's what it was like when I was North Korea watcher in the State Department (1970-72 and 1976-79). One day, a western journalist made it to Pyongyang. At that time, that was very unusual and we devoted a lot of effort to debriefing him when he got back. Then as now, however, the best way to understand the North Koreans was to read their speeches, statements and media. The U.S. government has been congenitally lazy about doing this.

Thank you for your offer to buy my future book, "In with Kim, or: How I Stopped Worrying and Learned to Love Pyongyang." Unfortunately, even if Kim Jong-Un sent an engraved invitation -- or better yet, his personal Tupolev Tu-154 -- I would have to decline the opportunity. For a variety of reasons, of which my aversion to so-called "photo ID" is only one, I'm not able to travel. I would have loved to be a fly on the wall when Dennis Rodman and the Supreme Leader were getting it on.

The way those -154s fall out of the sky, you might not survive take-off or landing.

MACHINE666
04-01-2013, 07:00 PM
I just love everything about Korea and I don't think a year is long enough to get what I want out of it.


The hell are you smoking, Beavis?

Or are you waiting for Tattoo Sue to return to her home land? Between Osan, Kunsan and Itaewon, I've lost track of her whereabouts. Rumor has it she morphed into Songtan Sally!!!

:D :D :D :D :D



http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c23/ronburton22/-1.jpg

eman_osan
04-02-2013, 08:07 AM
Machine - Trust me Tatoo Sue is a live and well. I met her the first time back in 1983 at the Kun and yes. she's still around.



The hell are you smoking, Beavis?

Or are you waiting for Tattoo Sue to return to her home land? Between Osan, Kunsan and Itaewon, I've lost track of her whereabouts. Rumor has it she morphed into Songtan Sally!!!

:D :D :D :D :D



http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c23/ronburton22/-1.jpg