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View Full Version : Who says you can't retire from the military and never work again..



ROAD
02-24-2013, 02:48 AM
no comment

Drackore
02-24-2013, 08:10 AM
Ain't it awesome? One of the places I am considering where they say you can live without a worry for $2k a month isn't on that list, but I love seeing those lists.

So sick of America anymore that every time I see those lists, the wife and I start doing our homework.

Robert F. Dorr
02-24-2013, 11:51 AM
Surfing yahoo, because I'm old and I still think yahoo rocks and I rfan across this article. If this article is even remotely true, goodbye US and hello...to those place i can live very comfortably for 1500 a month!!

http://finance.yahoo.com/news/8-great-places-to-retire-abroad-175538395.html?page=1&desktop_view_default=true

Why would anyone want not to work?

Drackore
02-24-2013, 12:47 PM
Because we're paying for those who don't, and getting the rich richer off of our backs for an unfair share of that pie. Why not take our retirements and move somewhere so that it can stretch out to a comfortable, work-free and abuse free society?

CrustySMSgt
02-24-2013, 03:43 PM
Surfing yahoo, because I'm old and I still think yahoo rocks and I rfan across this article. If this article is even remotely true, goodbye US and hello...to those place i can live very comfortably for 1500 a month!!

http://finance.yahoo.com/news/8-great-places-to-retire-abroad-175538395.html?page=1&desktop_view_default=true

In April I took a 10 day motorcycle tour around Ecuador and was AMAZED at all the ex-pats living there. They live like kings, and if you're single, you ARE a king!! Prime example, we were in Canoa for 2 days, staying at a hotel right on the beach. Walking down the row of bars/resturaunts along the water and stopped for lunch and sat at one of the tables out in front of the joint, sharing a table with an older Canadian fellow, probably pushing 65... balding, with a nice beer gut. We chatted and he was telling us about his place in the town just south of there; he lived in an apartment 2 blocks from the beach. He has most of his meals delivered and once a week a guy brings him a bucket full of GIANT shrimp to throw on the grill and he pays a whopping $10 for them! As we're chatting, this SMOKING HOT 20-something black/hispanic mixed looking gal in a teeny bikini and sarong comes and sits down next to him and kisses him on the cheek. Seeing our jaws drop, he acknowledged that this was his "room mate!!" He said if you've got money, they don't care how old you are... treat them nice and they are all yours! Only problem is they think you have a never ending supply of money, so you've got to get to be realistic.. but beyond that, he said there are 1000 more like her out there. He said he lives on between $1000-1200 a month and lives like a millionare.

And once you turn 65, you've REALLY got it made!



Ecuador’s senior-citizen discount program is intended to help its own citizens. But the country’s constitution guarantees foreign residents the same rights as citizens—so as a retiree, you’ll enjoy the same benefits.

These include:

50% off public and private transportation within the country (including the Galápagos)
50% off tickets for all cultural and sporting events, including movies
50% off electric and water bills (below certain usage levels)
Free domestic landline phone service (does not include long distance and other services)
You’ll also get 50% off international airfares on Taca, Copa, or AeroGal for round-trip flights originating in Ecuador
Best of all, you never have to stand in line. If you’re a senior citizen, when you make a bank deposit or pay your utility bill, it’s the law that you go directly to the front of the line.

When you’re over 65, you pay lower income tax. And you get any money spent on VAT (value-added tax) refunded each month—up to about $250.

The Ecuadorian government also guarantees senior citizens access to free health care and medication, and exemption from notary and registration fees.



If you are a "pensioner" who can prove you make over $8,000 a month, and you stay in Ecuador for 9 months out of two consecutive years, you become a "resident" (which is different than citizenship, which would require you to renounce your US citizenship) and have all the rights of an Ecuadorian, except the right to vote!
http://www.discovercuencaecuador.com/2011/08/pensioner-10-i-residency-visa-in.html

As you can tell, I've given it a little thought :)

Airborne
02-24-2013, 04:49 PM
Because we're paying for those who don't, and getting the rich richer off of our backs for an unfair share of that pie. Why not take our retirements and move somewhere so that it can stretch out to a comfortable, work-free and abuse free society?

Ummm....damn near all of those cities are in countries with single payer health care and social programs that would put us to shame. If you dont like that then you might as well stay in the US.

OtisRNeedleman
02-24-2013, 05:06 PM
Why would anyone want not to work?

Because there are many more other neat things to do in life besides work. Have worked in a number of areas since retiring. Never had a single job that really compared to most of the things I did on active duty, even as a new second lieutenant. No, if you can afford not to work, than why waste the time? You won't be missed in the civilian workforce - too many unemployed as it is. Look at it this way - if you can afford not to work and don't work, then someone who really needs the job has a better chance of getting the job. And your time is your own. A win-win all around.

CrustySMSgt
02-24-2013, 05:11 PM
Why would anyone want not to work?

Not a matter of not WANTING to work, but not HAVING to work. When I retire I'll do something I WANT to do, even if it is just volunteering. I'll find plenty of ways to keep myself busy and out enjoying life.

CrustySMSgt
02-24-2013, 05:36 PM
I thought the place in Malaysia would be the best until I read up on Malaysian laws, which are basically Muslim laws, no thanks. So now i'm thinking Panama or Ecuador, not sure what the guidelines are for either country, but I will find out. Plus let's face it, Hispanics are hot

Ecuador has so much to see... you can be at 14,000' in the morning and drive to the beach. And the Equator is pretty cool! People are very nice, from the mom & pop roadside resturaunts, to the city folks in Quito. And you can eat until you pop for under $20 pretty much anywhere. I would love to get back down there and spend a year riding around the country on a motorcycle!

Drackore
02-24-2013, 05:54 PM
The point I was making was that if I can't escape it, then I'll go somewhere that my money is worthwhile and a better place to live overall. And one benefit of military service - you get to see a LOT of places that are better to live than in the US.


Ummm....damn near all of those cities are in countries with single payer health care and social programs that would put us to shame. If you dont like that then you might as well stay in the US.

bluecyclone1
02-24-2013, 07:09 PM
It appears there has been a shift in the expat migration from west to south. It used to be everyone went to the Philippines. I guess Latin America has just become the new "Florida" for retired GIs??

tiredretiredE7
02-24-2013, 07:23 PM
Not a matter of not WANTING to work, but not HAVING to work. When I retire I'll do something I WANT to do, even if it is just volunteering. I'll find plenty of ways to keep myself busy and out enjoying life.

I am jobless so I volunteer to take the dog I rescued from my last assignment around to oldfolks homes to visit terminally ill residents. Hopefully carma will swing my way soon or I am moving the the Republic of Texas.

jondstewart
02-25-2013, 06:36 AM
What the hell?! Living like a king in Ecuador on a $1500 a month military pension, elderly, and with a smoking hot young girl?! Jeez, I live in Alaska and my military pension does not even cover my house payment! But nevertheless, I've been fortunate, since I'm now working a job that pays a little more overall than I made when I retired

giggawatt
02-25-2013, 10:47 AM
Why would anyone want not to work?

Not everyone can get paid for doing what they love. If I could get paid for playing hockey, I'd never stop "working".

Airman of Darkness
02-25-2013, 11:37 AM
Not everyone can get paid for doing what they love. If I could get paid for playing hockey, I'd never stop "working".

how about you START WORKING NOW INSTEAD OF DOING NOTHING AT ALL>!

BENDER56
02-25-2013, 03:29 PM
Let's take a vote:
How many people retired and stopped working for good?

I have, so far. And I'm not even doing any of the supposed-to-do stuff, e.g., volunteering, either. I do whatever I feel like doing whenever I feel like doing it. I live a totally selfish life and I don't feel a twinge of guilt about it.

I sleep in. When I get up I pour myself a cup of coffee (made by my wife before she leaves for work), turn on the local public radio station, turn on the TV to Sport Center with the sound off, and read the Tampa Bay Times in a recliner. By the time I've read all the sections and completed the three crossword puzzles, the chess puzzle, the Jumble, the Cryptoquote and the Kakuro, it's around noon. Then I'll make brunch and surf the web for a while. After that I usually go for a jog or a bicycle ride. Before the wife gets home I straighten up the condo and, if necessary, do laundry. When she gets home we have cocktails and I make dinner. Then we go to the hot tub for a while and after that watch the shows we've DVR'ed. On weekends we do long rides on the Pinellas bike trail and watch the sun set on the water over drinks and beach-shack food.

Due to our location, we also frequently entertain friends and relatives from the North. That's kinda like work in a sense, but it's fulfilling work.

giggawatt
02-25-2013, 03:44 PM
how about you START WORKING NOW INSTEAD OF DOING NOTHING AT ALL>!

how about you SHUT THE HELL UP<@#$

TSgt"M"
02-25-2013, 04:09 PM
Let's take a vote:
How many people retired and stopped working for good?

I teach high school auto shop 9 months a year. Almost a perfect job.

Pullinteeth
02-25-2013, 04:46 PM
My wife...

Rainmaker
02-25-2013, 04:47 PM
LBFM's!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Flip LBFMs > Ecuadorian LBFMs in Rainmaker professional opinion. Boff excellent choices for retirement

Rainmaker
02-25-2013, 04:49 PM
LBFM's!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


My wife...

Ex Wife's Shyster Divorce Lawyer!

BENDER56
02-25-2013, 04:54 PM
Hopefully you are serious, it sounds a lot like my days...
Next time we go to Florida, ill look you up.
I'm only 7 months into being retired, any advice
For this rookie?

Hmm ... unsure how that could have been interpreted as facetious, but yeah, that's my typical day.

The only advice I have for anyone who wants to live like this is to not buy stuff you don't need throughout your lives and instead sock your earnings away for later. Also, it helps to be content living a modest lifestyle.

OtisRNeedleman
02-25-2013, 07:48 PM
how about you START WORKING NOW INSTEAD OF DOING NOTHING AT ALL>!

If they don't have to work, why work?

MACHINE666
02-25-2013, 09:22 PM
Does sperm donor count as 'work'?

:D :D :D :D :D

Rainmaker
02-25-2013, 09:25 PM
Does sperm donor count as 'work'?

:D :D :D :D :D

Rainmaker checked into this. You have to be Under 30 yrs old over 6' and have an Associates Degree. Folks, Yet another reason to get your CCAF.

CrustySMSgt
02-26-2013, 05:15 AM
Rainmaker checked into this. You have to be Under 30 yrs old over 6' and have an Associates Degree. Folks, Yet another reason to get your CCAF.

Well played!!

CrustySMSgt
02-26-2013, 05:21 AM
I have, so far. And I'm not even doing any of the supposed-to-do stuff, e.g., volunteering, either. I do whatever I feel like doing whenever I feel like doing it. I live a totally selfish life and I don't feel a twinge of guilt about it.

I sleep in. When I get up I pour myself a cup of coffee (made by my wife before she leaves for work), turn on the local public radio station, turn on the TV to Sport Center with the sound off, and read the Tampa Bay Times in a recliner. By the time I've read all the sections and completed the three crossword puzzles, the chess puzzle, the Jumble, the Cryptoquote and the Kakuro, it's around noon. Then I'll make brunch and surf the web for a while. After that I usually go for a jog or a bicycle ride. Before the wife gets home I straighten up the condo and, if necessary, do laundry. When she gets home we have cocktails and I make dinner. Then we go to the hot tub for a while and after that watch the shows we've DVR'ed. On weekends we do long rides on the Pinellas bike trail and watch the sun set on the water over drinks and beach-shack food.

Due to our location, we also frequently entertain friends and relatives from the North. That's kinda like work in a sense, but it's fulfilling work.


You sir are my hero!! I look forward to living just such a dream in the next couple years!! Except I'm lucky enough that I'll be sharing that time with my wife who's already living that dream!



My wife...

<doh>

BENDER56
02-26-2013, 06:38 PM
You sir are my hero!! I look forward to living just such a dream in the next couple years!! Except I'm lucky enough that I'll be sharing that time with my wife who's already living that dream!

With Chief's retirement pay and (I'm assuming) your wife's retirement pay you shouldn't have any problem living without having to work again. Hell, I'm doing it on a MSgt's retirement.

My wife's still the love of my life but sometimes I wonder "what if" when I think of all the hot captains and majors who used to flirt with me during my medic days. I could enjoy a fairly lavish lifestyle on a combined E-7/O-5 retirement income.

BENDER56
02-26-2013, 06:40 PM
over 6' or 6" ???

Maybe he isn't referring to height, but length.

Rainmaker
02-26-2013, 09:19 PM
Maybe he isn't referring to height, but length.

Raimaker like a smashed oil can.

Shrike
02-28-2013, 05:21 AM
Sounds like the dream.
Shrike used to talk about
Cigar on back porch.
Maybe hell chime in
And say what he's doing.
See ya this summer.

Retirement is awesome. I sleep in until the dog comes whining to be taken for a walk around 0730. We take about a 1.5 mile walk. Then it's breakfast time, coffee, and checking the news, cigar forum, and e-mail. Do about 1/2 hour on the exercise bike, some housework, shower, then it's lunchtime. Grab a cigar after lunch, head out to the patio, smoke and do some sudokos. Take a hike through the woods with the dog. Then back to the house to take care of any chores, housework, or shopping that remains to be done. Wife gets home, we have dinner, then it's time for a good cigar along with a good glass of whiskey on the back porch as the moon rises above the trees.

I do not miss the USAF at all - except for the people, some of whom are among the best people I'll ever encounter - but then again I did spend a fuckload of my last decade of service on staff. There is very little to be missed about staff work. If I had retired out of a squadron I'm sure I'd miss it more.

I'm not working and have no plans to start soon. I did over 24 years on AD and I'm enjoying the down time. My wife's still on AD and we're PCS'ing later on this year. Once we get to our new base I plan on looking for a part-time job. Several years ago we were in Edinburgh and stumbled upon a shop that sold nothing but whiskey and cigars. It is my fondest dream that at our new base there is a similar shop in the community and they need an assistant manager. :)

There's life after the USAF, folks. And if you don't want to spend your life after it answering to other people you don't have to if you're smart about it.

Drackore
02-28-2013, 05:41 AM
I've been maxing out my IRA, putting money into the wife's IRA, putting money into TSP, and I had started a college IRA for my kid several years before the new GI Bill (so now my kid gets the GI Bill and I kept putting money into that IRA so he is cleared hot all the way to Master's Degree).

I could really stop at 20, but I want to do 24 or 25 (if I have the patience for it). I should be SMSgt by then. I took the dreaded REDUX (I know I know) but we looked at our debt and decided that the $30K (well $23K after taxes) against the debt and the money we save into TSP and her IRA would be a better choice.

If the economy recovers in five years and the wife can find a job, we'll stay in the States. If not, one of these many overseas locations will become our new home.

CrustySMSgt
02-28-2013, 06:49 AM
Retirement is awesome. I sleep in until the dog comes whining to be taken for a walk around 0730. We take about a 1.5 mile walk. Then it's breakfast time, coffee, and checking the news, cigar forum, and e-mail. Do about 1/2 hour on the exercise bike, some housework, shower, then it's lunchtime. Grab a cigar after lunch, head out to the patio, smoke and do some sudokos. Take a hike through the woods with the dog. Then back to the house to take care of any chores, housework, or shopping that remains to be done. Wife gets home, we have dinner, then it's time for a good cigar along with a good glass of whiskey on the back porch as the moon rises above the trees.

I do not miss the USAF at all - except for the people, some of whom are among the best people I'll ever encounter - but then again I did spend a fuckload of my last decade of service on staff. There is very little to be missed about staff work. If I had retired out of a squadron I'm sure I'd miss it more.

I'm not working and have no plans to start soon. I did over 24 years on AD and I'm enjoying the down time. My wife's still on AD and we're PCS'ing later on this year. Once we get to our new base I plan on looking for a part-time job. Several years ago we were in Edinburgh and stumbled upon a shop that sold nothing but whiskey and cigars. It is my fondest dream that at our new base there is a similar shop in the community and they need an assistant manager. :)

There's life after the USAF, folks. And if you don't want to spend your life after it answering to other people you don't have to if you're smart about it.

Glad to hear you're living the dream!!

giggawatt
02-28-2013, 12:35 PM
Retirement is awesome. I sleep in until the dog comes whining to be taken for a walk around 0730. We take about a 1.5 mile walk. Then it's breakfast time, coffee, and checking the news, cigar forum, and e-mail. Do about 1/2 hour on the exercise bike, some housework, shower, then it's lunchtime. Grab a cigar after lunch, head out to the patio, smoke and do some sudokos. Take a hike through the woods with the dog. Then back to the house to take care of any chores, housework, or shopping that remains to be done. Wife gets home, we have dinner, then it's time for a good cigar along with a good glass of whiskey on the back porch as the moon rises above the trees.

I do not miss the USAF at all - except for the people, some of whom are among the best people I'll ever encounter - but then again I did spend a fuckload of my last decade of service on staff. There is very little to be missed about staff work. If I had retired out of a squadron I'm sure I'd miss it more.

I'm not working and have no plans to start soon. I did over 24 years on AD and I'm enjoying the down time. My wife's still on AD and we're PCS'ing later on this year. Once we get to our new base I plan on looking for a part-time job. Several years ago we were in Edinburgh and stumbled upon a shop that sold nothing but whiskey and cigars. It is my fondest dream that at our new base there is a similar shop in the community and they need an assistant manager. :)

There's life after the USAF, folks. And if you don't want to spend your life after it answering to other people you don't have to if you're smart about it.

Outstanding! I'm PCSing to the UK in a few months and plan on making many trips to Scotland. My wife is British and I've often thought about settling in England. I could really see myself living in Edinburgh.

KellyinAvon
03-01-2013, 02:12 AM
Retirement is awesome. I sleep in until the dog comes whining to be taken for a walk around 0730. We take about a 1.5 mile walk. Then it's breakfast time, coffee, and checking the news, cigar forum, and e-mail. Do about 1/2 hour on the exercise bike, some housework, shower, then it's lunchtime. Grab a cigar after lunch, head out to the patio, smoke and do some sudokos. Take a hike through the woods with the dog. Then back to the house to take care of any chores, housework, or shopping that remains to be done. Wife gets home, we have dinner, then it's time for a good cigar along with a good glass of whiskey on the back porch as the moon rises above the trees.

I do not miss the USAF at all - except for the people, some of whom are among the best people I'll ever encounter - but then again I did spend a fuckload of my last decade of service on staff. There is very little to be missed about staff work. If I had retired out of a squadron I'm sure I'd miss it more.

I'm not working and have no plans to start soon. I did over 24 years on AD and I'm enjoying the down time. My wife's still on AD and we're PCS'ing later on this year. Once we get to our new base I plan on looking for a part-time job. Several years ago we were in Edinburgh and stumbled upon a shop that sold nothing but whiskey and cigars. It is my fondest dream that at our new base there is a similar shop in the community and they need an assistant manager. :)

There's life after the USAF, folks. And if you don't want to spend your life after it answering to other people you don't have to if you're smart about it.

Great to hear from you Shrike. Glad to hear you're enjoying retirement. Blue-ID Mafia, life of leisure family:biggrin

BENDER56
03-01-2013, 04:18 PM
Retirement is awesome. I sleep in until the dog comes whining to be taken for a walk around 0730. We take about a 1.5 mile walk. Then it's breakfast time, coffee, and checking the news, cigar forum, and e-mail. Do about 1/2 hour on the exercise bike, some housework, shower, then it's lunchtime. Grab a cigar after lunch, head out to the patio, smoke and do some sudokos. Take a hike through the woods with the dog. Then back to the house to take care of any chores, housework, or shopping that remains to be done. Wife gets home, we have dinner, then it's time for a good cigar along with a good glass of whiskey on the back porch as the moon rises above the trees.

I do not miss the USAF at all - except for the people, some of whom are among the best people I'll ever encounter - but then again I did spend a fuckload of my last decade of service on staff. There is very little to be missed about staff work. If I had retired out of a squadron I'm sure I'd miss it more.

I'm not working and have no plans to start soon. I did over 24 years on AD and I'm enjoying the down time. My wife's still on AD and we're PCS'ing later on this year. Once we get to our new base I plan on looking for a part-time job. Several years ago we were in Edinburgh and stumbled upon a shop that sold nothing but whiskey and cigars. It is my fondest dream that at our new base there is a similar shop in the community and they need an assistant manager. :)

There's life after the USAF, folks. And if you don't want to spend your life after it answering to other people you don't have to if you're smart about it.

Well, welcome back. You pretty much fell off the Earth a few months back. I was actually worried something bad had happened to you. Good to see my fears were unfounded.

Robert F. Dorr
03-09-2013, 11:58 PM
Retirement is awesome. I sleep in until the dog comes whining to be taken for a walk around 0730. We take about a 1.5 mile walk. Then it's breakfast time, coffee, and checking the news, cigar forum, and e-mail. Do about 1/2 hour on the exercise bike, some housework, shower, then it's lunchtime. Grab a cigar after lunch, head out to the patio, smoke and do some sudokos. Take a hike through the woods with the dog. Then back to the house to take care of any chores, housework, or shopping that remains to be done. Wife gets home, we have dinner, then it's time for a good cigar along with a good glass of whiskey on the back porch as the moon rises above the trees.

I do not miss the USAF at all - except for the people, some of whom are among the best people I'll ever encounter - but then again I did spend a fuckload of my last decade of service on staff. There is very little to be missed about staff work. If I had retired out of a squadron I'm sure I'd miss it more.

I'm not working and have no plans to start soon. I did over 24 years on AD and I'm enjoying the down time. My wife's still on AD and we're PCS'ing later on this year. Once we get to our new base I plan on looking for a part-time job. Several years ago we were in Edinburgh and stumbled upon a shop that sold nothing but whiskey and cigars. It is my fondest dream that at our new base there is a similar shop in the community and they need an assistant manager. :)

There's life after the USAF, folks. And if you don't want to spend your life after it answering to other people you don't have to if you're smart about it.

Wasn't the same around here without Shrike.

sandsjames
03-10-2013, 12:27 PM
Great to hear from you Shrike. Glad to hear you're enjoying retirement. Blue-ID Mafia, life of leisure family:biggrin106 days....

RobotChicken
08-24-2013, 12:05 AM
Retirement is awesome. I sleep in until the dog comes whining to be taken for a walk around 0730. We take about a 1.5 mile walk. Then it's breakfast time, coffee, and checking the news, cigar forum, and e-mail. Do about 1/2 hour on the exercise bike, some housework, shower, then it's lunchtime. Grab a cigar after lunch, head out to the patio, smoke and do some sudokos. Take a hike through the woods with the dog. Then back to the house to take care of any chores, housework, or shopping that remains to be done. Wife gets home, we have dinner, then it's time for a good cigar along with a good glass of whiskey on the back porch as the moon rises above the trees.

I do not miss the USAF at all - except for the people, some of whom are among the best people I'll ever encounter - but then again I did spend a fuckload of my last decade of service on staff. There is very little to be missed about staff work. If I had retired out of a squadron I'm sure I'd miss it more.

I'm not working and have no plans to start soon. I did over 24 years on AD and I'm enjoying the down time. My wife's still on AD and we're PCS'ing later on this year. Once we get to our new base I plan on looking for a part-time job. Several years ago we were in Edinburgh and stumbled upon a shop that sold nothing but whiskey and cigars. It is my fondest dream that at our new base there is a similar shop in the community and they need an assistant manager. :)

There's life after the USAF, folks. And if you don't want to spend your life after it answering to other people you don't have to if you're smart about it.

:spy "SHRIKE 'Brass' where the H*** are you?"(You don't know what you're 'MISSING')