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Blue Warrior
01-28-2013, 10:02 AM
Once upon a time I was a member of the club, then one day I woke up and realized that I was pissing away $18.00 in membership fees per month for absolutely NOTHING in return (sorry, but the $2.00 lunch discount isn't a return on investment).

About a year ago, our Director (Gen Officer) decided against holding a professional development session at the club because they wanted $50.00 for the room. That's right, they lost 35 potential lunch customers ($8.00 per plate?) because they insisted on the $50 room fee. Fools!

Not sure why CONUS clubs haven't completely died yet, but I'd love to see their financial statements. There's absolutely NO WAY most of them can stay afloat without taxpayer subsidies.

Does your leadership still push club membership, even if there's zero return on investment? Are there any clubs in the states even worth belonging to? Seems to me that unless you're at Nellis, your club gets almost no business.

tiredretiredE7
01-28-2013, 10:08 AM
Once upon a time I was a member of the club, then one day I woke up and realized that I was pissing away $18.00 in membership fees per month for absolutely NOTHING in return (sorry, but the $2.00 lunch discount isn't a return on investment).

About a year ago, our Director (Gen Officer) decided against holding a professional development session at the club because they wanted $50.00 for the room. That's right, they lost 35 potential lunch customers ($8.00 per plate?) because they insisted on the $50 room fee. Fools!

Not sure why CONUS clubs haven't completely died yet, but I'd love to see their financial statements. There's absolutely NO WAY most of them can stay afloat without taxpayer subsidies.

Does your leadership still push club membership, even if there's zero return on investment? Are there any clubs in the states even worth belonging to? Seems to me that unless you're at Nellis, your club gets almost no business.

Enlisted leadership did push club membership. I have a friend who is the director of services (retired SMSgt services) and we were talking about club membership. He said the enlisted clubs stopped making money 15 years ago. I believe the enlisted clubs will be closed or combined with officer clubs very soon.

crwchf16
01-28-2013, 10:56 AM
Enlisted leadership did push club membership. I have a friend who is the director of services (retired SMSgt services) and we were talking about club membership. He said the enlisted clubs stopped making money 15 years ago. I believe the enlisted clubs will be closed or combined with officer clubs very soon.

Unless I'm mistaken (I'm not a club patron so I'm not 100% sure) weren't Officer and Enlisted clubs already combined at most bases? I agree with you though, nobody on his or her time off wants to spend it on base with all the rules and regs they must abide by.

TVANSCOT
01-28-2013, 11:16 AM
Back in the 80's most Airman's clubs were combined with the NCO clubs. Most officers clubs would likely close down before they allowed enlisted slugs in. I was just at JBLM and was surprised to see they still had a rather larger Officers club, didn't see any other club but was not looking for one either.

To the original poster, $50 to rent a room seems pretty reasonable to me, but I agree with you. The clubs are not essential to morale and if are not self-sustaining should be closed.

Pullinteeth
01-28-2013, 01:51 PM
Unless I'm mistaken (I'm not a club patron so I'm not 100% sure) weren't Officer and Enlisted clubs already combined at most bases? I agree with you though, nobody on his or her time off wants to spend it on base with all the rules and regs they must abide by.

Yep...........

sandsjames
01-28-2013, 02:00 PM
It's probably been 8-10 years since I was last asked/told that I should be a club member.

Sergeant eNYgma
01-28-2013, 02:36 PM
Back in the 80's most Airman's clubs were combined with the NCO clubs. Most officers clubs would likely close down before they allowed enlisted slugs in. I was just at JBLM and was surprised to see they still had a rather larger Officers club, didn't see any other club but was not looking for one either.

To the original poster, $50 to rent a room seems pretty reasonable to me, but I agree with you. The clubs are not essential to morale and if are not self-sustaining should be closed.

Here they are combined but I never go anyway. I went once to the E Club for a UFC PPV which they tried to make me a member of the club at that time. I refused...Senior was pissed but w/e...

Shaken1976
01-28-2013, 03:13 PM
I remember frequenting the club at Eielson as an airman. I had no car and it was within walking distance. There was a food place that was decent called Frick and Fracks. There were a lot of events hosted geared towards us as well. Then I PCS'd and went to the club at my new base and was highly disappointed.

BRUWIN
01-28-2013, 03:19 PM
Enlisted leadership did push club membership. I have a friend who is the director of services (retired SMSgt services) and we were talking about club membership. He said the enlisted clubs stopped making money 15 years ago. I believe the enlisted clubs will be closed or combined with officer clubs very soon.

I gave 3 EPRs to SNCOs that weren't members....right up until the day I retired. No CCAF...same dealeo.

bigKranium
01-28-2013, 04:23 PM
Having just retired, the last time I had anyone push club membership was my first assignment back in 93. After that, people figured it was wrong to strong arm memberships I guess. However, you go to the club at Andrews, and you will find the mugs on the wall (of pilots or squadron CC's don't care either way) in one of the smaller bars in the club. So I guess to be a part of that club, you need to be a part of the club. I was always a member at every overseas assignment I was at, because you could make up for it in some ways. I know Kadena had a great program. But stateside... crickets. Example... I could go to the Sports Page (yeah, not the club, but overseen by Services) and spend $9 for a small draft pitcher of domestic beer. OR go to the Legion in Clinton and spend $5 for a big pitcher of domestic. Tough choice.

grimreaper
01-28-2013, 05:30 PM
Once upon a time I was a member of the club, then one day I woke up and realized that I was pissing away $18.00 in membership fees per month for absolutely NOTHING in return (sorry, but the $2.00 lunch discount isn't a return on investment).

About a year ago, our Director (Gen Officer) decided against holding a professional development session at the club because they wanted $50.00 for the room. That's right, they lost 35 potential lunch customers ($8.00 per plate?) because they insisted on the $50 room fee. Fools!

Not sure why CONUS clubs haven't completely died yet, but I'd love to see their financial statements. There's absolutely NO WAY most of them can stay afloat without taxpayer subsidies.

Does your leadership still push club membership, even if there's zero return on investment? Are there any clubs in the states even worth belonging to? Seems to me that unless you're at Nellis, your club gets almost no business.

Unless you are overseas, it is pointless to have a club membership. When I was at Kadena, it was well worth it though. Club member discounts just about wherever you went and member's night at the club meant you would recoup you dues within the first week of the month.

Robert F. Dorr
01-28-2013, 05:34 PM
Having just retired, the last time I had anyone push club membership was my first assignment back in 93. After that, people figured it was wrong to strong arm memberships I guess. However, you go to the club at Andrews, and you will find the mugs on the wall (of pilots or squadron CC's don't care either way) in one of the smaller bars in the club. So I guess to be a part of that club, you need to be a part of the club. I was always a member at every overseas assignment I was at, because you could make up for it in some ways. I know Kadena had a great program. But stateside... crickets. Example... I could go to the Sports Page (yeah, not the club, but overseen by Services) and spend $9 for a small draft pitcher of domestic beer. OR go to the Legion in Clinton and spend $5 for a big pitcher of domestic. Tough choice.

The Legion is a taxpayer-subsidized bar where old white men sit around, drink, smoke, and waste time. Once a week they hold meetings where they recite a preamble that no members understand. They also have prayer, which has no place in this kind of meeting. They also promote sexism with a "sons of..." organization and a "women's auxiliary" (the latter term is not official but everyone uses it). Most large organizations in America are out of touch, especially with younger service members and veterans, but none is more out of touch than the American Legion.

71Fish
01-28-2013, 05:35 PM
Closing clubs CONUS is a cost cutting measure that can be taken and no one would know it happened. I was a club member in te 90's when I was at Ramstein, but haven't been a membe since. When I was recently at Kunsan, membership was pushed to the extent it can be pushed without making it a requirement for SNCOs and officers. I just can't see "supporting" something I have no interest in personally. The 2-3 time I went to s function at the club I just sucked it up and paid the extra $2.

sandsjames
01-28-2013, 06:39 PM
The Legion is a taxpayer-subsidized bar where old white men sit around, drink, smoke, and waste time. Once a week they hold meetings where they recite a preamble that no members understand. They also have prayer, which has no place in this kind of meeting. They also promote sexism with a "sons of..." organization and a "women's auxiliary" (the latter term is not official but everyone uses it). Most large organizations in America are out of touch, especially with younger service members and veterans, but none is more out of touch than the American Legion.

Luckily you aren't required to be a member.

71Fish
01-28-2013, 06:44 PM
The Legion is a taxpayer-subsidized bar where old white men sit around, drink, smoke, and waste time. Once a week they hold meetings where they recite a preamble that no members understand. They also have prayer, which has no place in this kind of meeting. They also promote sexism with a "sons of..." organization and a "women's auxiliary" (the latter term is not official but everyone uses it). Most large organizations in America are out of touch, especially with younger service members and veterans, but none is more out of touch than the American Legion.

Are they tax payer subsidized? I thought they were paid for by dues and fund raisers. You're right though about the clientele you find at a legion. I went to a legion once in about 2000, and it exactly that, old men smoking and drinking and wasting time. Probably was valid 60 years ago, but not today.

sandsjames
01-28-2013, 06:48 PM
The Legion is a taxpayer-subsidized bar where old white men sit around, drink, smoke, and waste time. Once a week they hold meetings where they recite a preamble that no members understand. They also have prayer, which has no place in this kind of meeting. They also promote sexism with a "sons of..." organization and a "women's auxiliary" (the latter term is not official but everyone uses it). Most large organizations in America are out of touch, especially with younger service members and veterans, but none is more out of touch than the American Legion.

In England, I was a member of the British Ex-Servicemans Club (great community bullet for 3 straight years). It was very similar (probably more like VFW), except we watched a lot of soccer. Great organization. I didn't find it out of touch at all. In fact, having beer while watching "footie" was exactly in touch with the younger generation.

bigKranium
01-28-2013, 07:13 PM
It's funny you say that. Because I have been witness to prayers at commanders call or other squadron organized events. I have witnessed groups within the military exclusive to certain races or cultures too. And to bring my final two cents to the club, every club stateside I have ever visited has been out of touch with it's customer in one way or the other.

I didn't mean to bring the Legion into it. I just used it as an example of where I would rather spend my money. On a side note, I will agree with you the Legion is out of touch with the younger veterans. But until organizations such as IAVA becomes larger and more organized than the Legion or VFW, then they will be still dominant organizations. Besides, I don't mind the old farts sitting around telling their stories. Fights hardly ever break out, and if they do, they don't last long because their O2 tanks will empty. That, and I hardly pay them any mind, afterall that's how I get through your articles! (I KID! :laugh) And on the subsidized thing. I agree. If a benevolent organization runs a business (like a bar) out of it's facilities, it should have to pay taxes like everyone else. But I also feel that orgs like the Legion, VFW, Lions, etc do a lot of good with their money that a Dave & Busters wouldn't.

Airborne
01-28-2013, 07:16 PM
Just another example of the base not being able to keep up with the current marketing techniques used off base. That and the anti-drinking culture. I can go to Buffalo wild wings closer to my house, talk to non air force people, eat food thats not jazzed up chow hall food, watch multiple screens and play the quiz thing they have. I can have two beers and not get the stink eye or get a ride if Im too inebriated instead of paying for a taxi from the base that is located 15 miles outside of town that the cabbies hate coming to anyway.
The clubs I have been to overseas are just "the club". Everyone welcome and they usually have the beer that is available in the host country. And public transportation is better overseas so its easier to get a ride home if youre wasted. Most people live near base overseas since outside of the gate is not infested with cheap hotels, pimps, and hookers like it is CONUS.

imported_chipotleboy
01-28-2013, 09:22 PM
My senior year of college, the Offutt AFB O Club gave free memberships to ROTC cadets in their last year. It was a blast. Friday nights they had free buffett, reasonable drink prices, a Top 40 band, and lots of eye candy. I show up to my first assignment at WPAFB and the club was a disappointment.

The only club I ever liked was McClellan AFB. They had free pizza for Monday Night Football. It was crappy pizza, but I gave them credit for trying--and this was after the base closure was announced.

OtisRNeedleman
01-28-2013, 11:05 PM
As a young lieutenant joined the Osan O Club. Didn't go there often but it was expected. After Osan joined the Goodfellow Consolidated Club. Again, rarely went but it was expected. When I went to Randolph as a captain joined the Randolph O Club. On the first day of school took my daughter for lunch at the Club. She got a big kick out of it. Remember the Club having some stuff for the kids. And I'll never forget getting food poisoning there when my boss had his retirement luncheon. When I went to Fort Meade didn't join the Fort Meade O Club. Nobody cared. Didn't join the Consolidated Club at the Presidio of Monterey when I went there. Had better things to do with my time and my money. Overall liked the Randolph O Club the best, if for nothing else than the memory of seeing my little daughter having lunch with her dad on the first day of school.

Mr. Happy
01-29-2013, 12:11 AM
I fail to see how merely "being a club member" makes someone any more professional, committed or dedicated to the Air Force. It may have been relevant decades ago when people sat around smoking and having drinks after the duty day to build camraderie, but that era died out a long time ago.

sandsjames
01-29-2013, 12:25 AM
I fail to see how merely "being a club member" makes someone any more professional, committed or dedicated to the Air Force. It may have been relevant decades ago when people sat around smoking and having drinks after the duty day to build camraderie, but that era died out a long time ago.

Man, if we could sit around smoking and having drinks after the duty day, I'd be a member.

Blue Warrior
01-29-2013, 12:42 AM
It may have been relevant decades ago when people sat around smoking and having drinks after the duty day to build camraderie, but that era died out a long time ago.

Ah...the good 'ole days. These days...
- If you drink two beers, you're over the legal limit to drive and risk losing rank.
- If you don't drive and you're seen drinking three beers, then you're a suspect drunk. Get ready to visit the shirt!
- If you drink four beers and accidently bump into someone, then you can be arrested for an ARI (alchohol related incident). Get your blues ready for your CC appointment!
- If you drink five beers and smile the wrong way at a hot Airman/LT, then you have created a hostile environment for the female "warriors," and become public enemy #1 by Gen Welsh.
- If you drink six beers at the club, then off to ADAPT you go!

- If you go downtown to hang out, well then have a great time!

JD2780
01-29-2013, 12:46 AM
Ah...the good 'ole days. These days...
- If you drink two beers, you're over the legal limit to drive and risk losing rank.
- If you don't drive and you're seen drinking three beers, then you're a suspect drunk. Get ready to visit the shirt!
- If you drink four beers and accidently bump into someone, then you can be arrested for an ARI (alchohol related incident). Get your blues ready for your CC appointment!
- If you drink five beers and smile the wrong way at a hot Airman/LT, then you have created a hostile environment for the female "warriors," and become public enemy #1 by Gen Welsh.
- If you drink six beers at the club, then off to ADAPT you go!

- If you go downtown to hang out, well then have a great time!

Unless you're an O-6 or higher. Then you just get orders to a new duty station.

sgtpotsie
01-29-2013, 06:15 AM
The only place it has ever been beneficial to have a club membership was in Korea. At Kunsan, they did free food all the time, and it was a great place to go after curfew until they closed. Aside from my 2 tours in Korea, I have not set foot in an E Club, either stateside or at my current assignment at Ramstein. I recently cancelled my membership, because I couldn't justify the dues for the occasional discount at various on-base eateries. If I ever go back to Korea, I will get a membership again. Unless and until that happens, I'll survive without it.

As for the American Legion, VFW, AMVETS, etc, they are definitely out of touch with the younger generation and I don't see that changing until the younger generation does something about it. It would take involvement from the younger crowd at a national level to institute changes. The generation gap is just too large between the Vietnam vets and our generation. I have a lifetime membership for the VFW, even though I rarely find myself there.

Blue Warrior
01-29-2013, 10:03 AM
As for the American Legion, VFW, AMVETS, etc, they are definitely out of touch with the younger generation and I don't see that changing until the younger generation does something about it.

The younger generation will do something about it. They will ignore those organizations and watch them close, one post after the next as the older generation dies off. I've served 23 years and never once stepped foot into a VFW or American Legion. I have no interest now and doubt I ever will.

sgtpotsie
01-31-2013, 01:05 PM
Which is unfortunate, considering many of these organizations lobby for veterans' benefits at the national level. Without a voice, what will happen to the benefits we have earned when the politicians decide that will be the first place to start making cuts? Food for thought.

OtisRNeedleman
01-31-2013, 09:07 PM
Which is unfortunate, considering many of these organizations lobby for veterans' benefits at the national level. Without a voice, what will happen to the benefits we have earned when the politicians decide that will be the first place to start making cuts? Food for thought.

Good point, but the organizations need to stay relevant to the younger generations. Had 21 years and some change. Retired 14 years ago. See no reason to join the VFW or the American Legion. Just have no desire to sit around somewhere, smell tobacco smoke, and listen to the same stories over and over. Since I don't drink or smoke there's nothing there for me.

TVANSCOT
02-01-2013, 10:57 AM
when people sat around smoking and having drinks after the duty day to build camraderie, but that era died out a long time ago.

Sigh.... don't you know it. Now to build camaraderie we form teams of people to run around offices looking for offensive magazines and pictures. Sad.

imported_chipotleboy
02-01-2013, 11:56 AM
Sigh.... don't you know it. Now to build camaraderie we form teams of people to run around offices looking for offensive magazines and pictures. Sad.

And we didn't have a problem with club membership when they had strippers...

BRUWIN
02-01-2013, 12:34 PM
And we didn't have a problem with club membership when they had strippers...

I only went on chess night. Oh...and ladies mud wrestling night at Lakenheath, until it got banned.

tiredretiredE7
02-01-2013, 12:40 PM
I only went on chess night. Oh...and ladies mud wrestling night at Lakenheath, until it got banned.

How many matches did you win?

BRUWIN
02-01-2013, 12:48 PM
How many matches did you win?

It wasn't for men with CCAF degrees so I couldn't wrestle. It was mainly for ladies without a CCAF degree but they may have waived the female sex requirement for you.

Robert F. Dorr
02-01-2013, 12:50 PM
I'm pretty sure that the past practice of pressuring Air Force members to join clubs is on the wane. I'm not sure why we need clubs at stateside bases when civilian facilities are nearby. I would like to hear whether anyone has been pressured recently to sign up for club membership or of any other developments that makes membership anything but 100% voluntary.

BRUWIN
02-01-2013, 12:57 PM
I'm pretty sure that the past practice of pressuring Air Force members to join clubs is on the wane. I'm not sure why we need clubs at stateside bases when civilian facilities are nearby. I would like to hear whether anyone has been pressured recently to sign up for club membership or of any other developments that makes membership anything but 100% voluntary.

Those days of pressure are long past. I don't think anybody cares whether one is a member or not anymore. But back in the day I actually had supervisors ask to see my club card to prove I was a member. Back in those days it was just a local card and it didn't cost anything to have it from what I remember. But it did let you charge drinks if you were broke. I used mine a ot.

BRUWIN
02-01-2013, 12:58 PM
I'm pretty sure that the past practice of pressuring Air Force members to join clubs is on the wane. I'm not sure why we need clubs at stateside bases when civilian facilities are nearby. I would like to hear whether anyone has been pressured recently to sign up for club membership or of any other developments that makes membership anything but 100% voluntary.

Those days of pressure are long past. I don't think anybody cares whether one is a member or not anymore. But back in the day I actually had supervisors ask to see my club card to prove I was a member. Back in those days it was just a local card and it didn't cost anything to have it from what I remember. But it did let you charge drinks if you were broke. I used mine a ot.

sandsjames
02-01-2013, 01:16 PM
Sigh.... don't you know it. Now to build camaraderie we form teams of people to run around offices looking for offensive magazines and pictures. Sad.

And "fun runs".

sandsjames
02-01-2013, 01:18 PM
I'm pretty sure that the past practice of pressuring Air Force members to join clubs is on the wane. I'm not sure why we need clubs at stateside bases when civilian facilities are nearby. I would like to hear whether anyone has been pressured recently to sign up for club membership or of any other developments that makes membership anything but 100% voluntary.

I don't think the clubs are pushed anymore because they aren't really military related anymore. Now, they are just a commercial facility on base.

imported_chipotleboy
02-01-2013, 02:14 PM
Those days of pressure are long past. I don't think anybody cares whether one is a member or not anymore. But back in the day I actually had supervisors ask to see my club card to prove I was a member. Back in those days it was just a local card and it didn't cost anything to have it from what I remember. But it did let you charge drinks if you were broke. I used mine a ot.

When I was a senior in AFROTC (1989), we were advised by our instructors to stop by the club to join before reporting in to our unit so we could show our new commanders that we were "team players".

At Wright-Patt, the tipping point in membership came when the club managers refused the CGOC's request to lower beer prices to the same as off base. The young members were seen as a cash cow to pay for retiree activities like Mah Johngg tournaments and Japanese Tea Ceremonies. A large number of members in the Materials Laboratory quit--then their O-6 refused to let stuff roll down hill when the club manager tried to get the chain of command to apply pressure to get them to rejoin. Once word got out, membership dropped from above 90% to around the 20% range.

71Fish
02-01-2013, 02:51 PM
I always found it funny when a new "manager" was hired for the clubs. They made promises of changes and new programs etc. Funny though, I've never been able to tell the difference from one club to another half way around the world. Although, when I was at Ramstein in the 90's, they hosted concerts by Charlie Daniels and David Allen Coe.

tiredretiredE7
02-01-2013, 06:16 PM
It wasn't for men with CCAF degrees so I couldn't wrestle. It was mainly for ladies without a CCAF degree but they may have waived the female sex requirement for you.

This answer is very confusing to me. Why would there be wrestling at a chess match? And why would you only wrestle men at the chess match? I think you misunderstood my question and have revealed your "other" lifestyle, not that there is anything wrong with that.

Domac
02-02-2013, 01:14 PM
I did not have a club card for the past 14 yrs until I came to my new assignment last August. I only got it at the time because the auto hobby shop offered free tows for club members and my car had just broken down. Since that time I have had the free tow, 40% off a new alternator and when I left the lights on in my car and killed the battery they came out and gave me a free jump. So far the card has paid for itself in these past few months. Then again I'm overseas so there are more opportunities for me to use the card here than stateside.

Quixotic
02-02-2013, 03:20 PM
I'm pretty sure that the past practice of pressuring Air Force members to join clubs is on the wane. I'm not sure why we need clubs at stateside bases when civilian facilities are nearby. I would like to hear whether anyone has been pressured recently to sign up for club membership or of any other developments that makes membership anything but 100% voluntary.

The last time I saw club membership pushed was about eight years ago. The guy stood up, talked up club membership a bit, and then asked who wanted an application form. Not one person raised their hand, he left empty handed, kinda felt sorry for him - just a tad.

Today, after two years on this base, I still have absolutely no clue where the club is located, I've heard there is one though.

Nickymaz
02-02-2013, 06:05 PM
I remember when I was in tech school at Goodfellow and the pressure to join the club was huge. We had multiple officers coming by our class pushing it hard over several week period. I guess the commander or someone had a bug up their ass for it and decided everyone had to have it. Granted we did have a good number of events at the club but it just struck me as extremely unprofessional to push a credit card of junior folks who may not need/want one.

Since then I've never heard anyone pushing club membership and personally I'd be glad if they just shut them all down or privatized them.

Mcjohn1118
02-02-2013, 07:26 PM
I was talking to my Commander the other day about the club here (W-P). The annual awards banquet is coming up and I told him I should volunteer to be an usher or escort since that was the only way I was going. He laughed and asked why. For $30, I get a small plate of lettuce, either chicken, beef or vegetarian lasagna, some potatoes and vegetables. Oh and a small dessert. Tea and coffee are free. $30! For that, I can eat so much better at a restaurant of my choosing. He then laughed and said, "But if you're a member, you can get your $2 discount. You see you pay $16 a month for the $2 discount." Even my Commander knows the club is a waste of money.

Capt Alfredo
02-03-2013, 12:48 AM
I remember when I was in tech school at Goodfellow and the pressure to join the club was huge. We had multiple officers coming by our class pushing it hard over several week period. I guess the commander or someone had a bug up their ass for it and decided everyone had to have it. Granted we did have a good number of events at the club but it just struck me as extremely unprofessional to push a credit card of junior folks who may not need/want one.

Since then I've never heard anyone pushing club membership and personally I'd be glad if they just shut them all down or privatized them.

Goodfellow was the only time I actually used and enjoyed the O Club. Free beer and food for members will do that. People actually had a good time. This was probably ten years ago, though. Ever since - worthless.

imported_Shove_your_stupid_meeting
02-03-2013, 03:42 PM
The rumor I had always heard was that the Officers Clubs didn't make money quite as easily as the Enlisted Clubs, so somewhere around 15 years or so ago, there was more of a push to host events at the O Clubs that may have normally been hosted at E Clubs prior to that. So then the E Clubs start to die, and there still isn't anyone going to the O Clubs unless they're directed too. Again, that's just what I had been told, although I did see some evidence that there was some truth to this belief at a couple of different bases about 10-12 years ago.

I can't say I'm too impressed with the E Club at MacDill. I suppose that with all the contractor's we have, and the Wing's dinky mission here resulting in them have a tiny footprint, not too mention that folks from the other service may not be too eager to jump into an AF Enlisted Club, there just isn't enough of a demand to warrant a stronger club presence.

Absinthe Anecdote
02-03-2013, 03:55 PM
The best thing about Air Force Club membership are the free cocktail weenies.

You can't go wrong with cocktail weenies! They taste as good as they look, and they come with this delicious red sauce. It
looks like ketchup. It tastes like ketchup. But brother, it ain't ketchup!

Steve-OK
02-03-2013, 06:14 PM
The best thing about Air Force Club membership are the free cocktail weenies.

You can't go wrong with cocktail weenies! They taste as good as they look, and they come with this delicious red sauce. It
looks like ketchup. It tastes like ketchup. But brother, it ain't ketchup!

Do you get $2 off the ketchup packets for being a member?

sandsjames
03-13-2013, 10:56 PM
Does your leadership still push club membership, even if there's zero return on investment? Are there any clubs in the states even worth belonging to? Seems to me that unless you're at Nellis, your club gets almost no business.

"Fightin' XXth!!!

I mentioned earlier that I haven't heard much about this over the last 10 years or so. Then, today, received this email. Don't know if it's a "push". Hopefully just an email and that's the last we'll hear of it 'til next year.

The Non-Appropriated Funds program (aka...AF Club) membership drive is in
high gear. I urge you to consider joining the Air Force Club. Not only
does using your Club card save your hard-earned money, it also benefits our
installation and Air Force community as a whole. MWR funds support key
services like the CDC, bowling alley, golf course and more. For
supervisors, consider that even if you personally don’t use these services,
some of the Airmen under you do use them.

See attached! There is also more information on our hallway bulletin board
and applications on the trophy case next to our bulletin board just outside
your Command Section.

Hope to see you at the Club!!!
v/r,"

sandsjames
03-14-2013, 12:15 AM
"F" the Club

I might take this post seriously, but your rep says you are "off the scale".

Class5Kayaker
03-14-2013, 05:50 PM
I remember when I was in tech school at Goodfellow and the pressure to join the club was huge. We had multiple officers coming by our class pushing it hard over several week period. I guess the commander or someone had a bug up their ass for it and decided everyone had to have it. Granted we did have a good number of events at the club but it just struck me as extremely unprofessional to push a credit card of junior folks who may not need/want one.

Since then I've never heard anyone pushing club membership and personally I'd be glad if they just shut them all down or privatized them.

The change from a local "club card" to an actual credit card is what killed it for a ton of us. Even more senior people. I didn't want nor need another credit card, and opening another CC account would have decreased my credit score.

LogDog
03-14-2013, 07:35 PM
The change from a local "club card" to an actual credit card is what killed it for a ton of us. Even more senior people. I didn't want nor need another credit card, and opening another CC account would have decreased my credit score.
I agree with you that as a credit card it impact your credit report. The question the club should be answering is "What do you offer me in return for joining."

I never really found a good answer to that question.

FLAPS
03-14-2013, 09:21 PM
We all concentrated on job and went camping, played poker, drank etc
and didn't talk military.

If you and the person you're talking to both enjoy your jobs, then why not talk about work? Or maybe you don't enjoy your jobs and like to get some laughs talking about work-related things/people that piss you off.

RobotChicken
03-14-2013, 10:22 PM
:horn How much do the 'Ringknockers A$$ociation' pay in dues?? :nono:heh:clock

Pullinteeth
03-15-2013, 01:15 PM
The change from a local "club card" to an actual credit card is what killed it for a ton of us. Even more senior people. I didn't want nor need another credit card, and opening another CC account would have decreased my credit score.

It killed it for some of the Jr Airmen too because their credit sucks @$$... Now I am not a member and don't go to the club for anything if I can avoid it. There is just nothing fun about it anymore. I used to go to the club to eat almost weekly and drank a TON at AF Clubs. Now? I can't even remember the last time they got one dime from me.... Maybe 2002? 2003?

VFFTSGT
03-15-2013, 02:28 PM
With exception to a couple lunches per week....the club at my base is dead. Most of the food sucks and it is WAY over-priced.

I don't club but for those that do, there is one just off my base that picks you up and drops you off. No base club can compete with that.