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Absinthe Anecdote
03-24-2012, 07:27 PM
Any veterans of Pirinçlik, Air Station aka The Duck out there?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pirin%C3%A7lik_Air_Base

A few random memories circa 1985-86…

The Kurdish village right beside the base that looked like it was plucked from the Bronze Age. We called it Bedrock.

The tremendously large flock of starlings that would roost on the radar antennae in the winter…

The Turkish contractors who ran the chow hall, they almost always seemed pissed off and yelled at each other constantly. If you ordered a hamburger with lettuce and tomato they would give you enough lettuce to make about five salads. I learned later that serving generous amounts of condiments with a meal is a traditional Turkish custom. Cool on them but we were bewildered by this. I used to get a kick out of watching people leave the serving line starring down at all that lettuce with a WTF look on their face.

The base interpreter, Fidel, who styled himself an intellectual and loved to invite people into his office for a cup of chai… A friendly dude but would talk your ear off…

The god awful horrendously overblown lip syncing contests they used to have at the base club. There was a group of cops who would dress up like an 80’s hair band and lip sync Van Halen songs. A few of us mockingly called them the Rock Kids. Their lip syncing extravaganzas ended the night one of them sprayed a halo-methane fire extinguisher vice a CO2 fire extinguisher for “smoke effects”.

For those of you who haven’t done their fire extinguisher CBT lately, it is hard to breathe in a room filled with that crap. Panic consumed the room of adoring Rock Kids fans and a stampede for the door ensued. No one was hurt but the lip syncing contests were over.

A fellow cop, nicknamed Thor, and I drunkenly rejoiced outside the club that night at the demise of the Rock Kids.

The night a bunch of Comms troops got drunk and took the big roll of wrapping paper from the Post Office and rolled it in and out of a few the barracks, including the one the Base CC lived in. They also toilet papered a bunch of trees.

I was on duty that night at one of the ECPs (I think) but my buddies who were on our Security Patrol and our one LE foot patrol were out on the base perimeter when it happened. The Base CC chewed their asses off for letting it happen and then initiated a recall to clean up all the paper.

I could go on but this is getting long. Okay last one, the LE troop with terrible personal hygiene and who approached his LE duties with a Barney Fife mentality. This kid was a real character; I’m pretty sure he came to The Duck from a SAC base. How he survived SAC being that way, I’ll never know.

If anyone was there during that time frame or other times, I’d love to hear from you. Even if you were a Rock Kid and even the LE troop I mentioned.

I’ll find some way to apologize…

Ripcord
03-24-2012, 07:32 PM
I was at Incirlik AB from 2001-2003. I know we still had a GSU at Diabykur but that's it. Sorry couldn't be more help.

Mr. Happy
03-24-2012, 07:50 PM
Any veterans of Pirinçlik, Air Station aka The Duck out there?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pirin%C3%A7lik_Air_Base

A few random memories circa 1985-86…

The Kurdish village right beside the base that looked like it was plucked from the Bronze Age. We called it Bedrock.

The tremendously large flock of starlings that would roost on the radar antennae in the winter…

The Turkish contractors who ran the chow hall, they almost always seemed pissed off and yelled at each other constantly. If you ordered a hamburger with lettuce and tomato they would give you enough lettuce to make about five salads. I learned later that serving generous amounts of condiments with a meal is a traditional Turkish custom. Cool on them but we were bewildered by this. I used to get a kick out of watching people leave the serving line starring down at all that lettuce with a WTF look on their face.

The base interpreter, Fidel, who styled himself an intellectual and loved to invite people into his office for a cup of chai… A friendly dude but would talk your ear off…

The god awful horrendously overblown lip syncing contests they used to have at the base club. There was a group of cops who would dress up like an 80’s hair band and lip sync Van Halen songs. A few of us mockingly called them the Rock Kids. Their lip syncing extravaganzas ended the night one of them sprayed a halo-methane fire extinguisher vice a CO2 fire extinguisher for “smoke effects”.

For those of you who haven’t done their fire extinguisher CBT lately, it is hard to breathe in a room filled with that crap. Panic consumed the room of adoring Rock Kids fans and a stampede for the door ensued. No one was hurt but the lip syncing contests were over.

A fellow cop, nicknamed Thor, and I drunkenly rejoiced outside the club that night at the demise of the Rock Kids.

The night a bunch of Comms troops got drunk and took the big roll of wrapping paper from the Post Office and rolled it in and out of a few the barracks, including the one the Base CC lived in. They also toilet papered a bunch of trees.

I was on duty that night at one of the ECPs (I think) but my buddies who were on our Security Patrol and our one LE foot patrol were out on the base perimeter when it happened. The Base CC chewed their asses off for letting it happen and then initiated a recall to clean up all the paper.

I could go on but this is getting long. Okay last one, the LE troop with terrible personal hygiene and who approached his LE duties with a Barney Fife mentality. This kid was a real character; I’m pretty sure he came to The Duck from a SAC base. How he survived SAC being that way, I’ll never know.

If anyone was there during that time frame or other times, I’d love to hear from you. Even if you were a Rock Kid and even the LE troop I mentioned.

I’ll find some way to apologize…

I was deployed to the Turkish air base at Diyarbikar right down the road (about 10 miles or so?) from Pirincilik in 91 for Provide Comfort. We were living in tent city conditions on the base, so we would actually go over to Pirincilik for "morale trips" to use their pool and get a burger and fries from the club. I remember thinking to myself how desolate of a remote assignment it seemed and I felt kind of sorry for the permanent party there.

The Kurdish city of Diyarbikar was very unique and there were many interesting ancient sights there, but I remember not feeling totally safe there. The PKK separatists or terrorists group (or whatever you wanted to call them) were active in the area. It was also apparent they didn't see many Westerners all too often in that city. Hordes of little kids followed us all over the place trying to get our attention yelling "mister, mister, mister, mister!". It was definitely a memorable experience though, and I'm glad I experienced it.

Absinthe Anecdote
03-24-2012, 08:29 PM
... I remember thinking to myself how desolate of a remote assignment it seemed and I felt kind of sorry for the permanent party there.

The Kurdish city of Diyarbikar was very unique and there were many interesting ancient sights there, but I remember not feeling totally safe there. The PKK separatists or terrorists group (or whatever you wanted to call them) were active in the area. It was also apparent they didn't see many Westerners all too often in that city. Hordes of little kids followed us all over the place trying to get our attention yelling "mister, mister, mister, mister!". It was definitely a memorable experience though, and I'm glad I experienced it.

It sucked being there for a year but I'm sure there are people out there who have had it much worse... I'll agree with you about it being memorable and being glad about the experience. I'm pretty sure by the time OPC kicked off the population of Diyarbakır had nearly doubled with Kurdish refugees...

Yes, the PKK were around in the 80's aswell but the Turks were/are pretty heavy handed with them. However, you probably had to worry more about being pelted with garbage as you walked down the street in Diyarbakir than being attacked by the PKK. Got hit with a tomato once; a friend of mine had a bucket of what looked like filthy dish water dumped on him from a second floor window. It's all good :)

Bychance
03-30-2013, 12:45 PM
Any veterans of Pirinçlik, Air Station aka The Duck out there?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pirin%C3%A7lik_Air_Base

A few random memories circa 1985-86…

The Kurdish village right beside the base that looked like it was plucked from the Bronze Age. We called it Bedrock.

The tremendously large flock of starlings that would roost on the radar antennae in the winter…

The Turkish contractors who ran the chow hall, they almost always seemed pissed off and yelled at each other constantly. If you ordered a hamburger with lettuce and tomato they would give you enough lettuce to make about five salads. I learned later that serving generous amounts of condiments with a meal is a traditional Turkish custom. Cool on them but we were bewildered by this. I used to get a kick out of watching people leave the serving line starring down at all that lettuce with a WTF look on their face.

The base interpreter, Fidel, who styled himself an intellectual and loved to invite people into his office for a cup of chai… A friendly dude but would talk your ear off…

The god awful horrendously overblown lip syncing contests they used to have at the base club. There was a group of cops who would dress up like an 80’s hair band and lip sync Van Halen songs. A few of us mockingly called them the Rock Kids. Their lip syncing extravaganzas ended the night one of them sprayed a halo-methane fire extinguisher vice a CO2 fire extinguisher for “smoke effects”.

For those of you who haven’t done their fire extinguisher CBT lately, it is hard to breathe in a room filled with that crap. Panic consumed the room of adoring Rock Kids fans and a stampede for the door ensued. No one was hurt but the lip syncing contests were over.

A fellow cop, nicknamed Thor, and I drunkenly rejoiced outside the club that night at the demise of the Rock Kids.

The night a bunch of Comms troops got drunk and took the big roll of wrapping paper from the Post Office and rolled it in and out of a few the barracks, including the one the Base CC lived in. They also toilet papered a bunch of trees.

I was on duty that night at one of the ECPs (I think) but my buddies who were on our Security Patrol and our one LE foot patrol were out on the base perimeter when it happened. The Base CC chewed their asses off for letting it happen and then initiated a recall to clean up all the paper.

I could go on but this is getting long. Okay last one, the LE troop with terrible personal hygiene and who approached his LE duties with a Barney Fife mentality. This kid was a real character; I’m pretty sure he came to The Duck from a SAC base. How he survived SAC being that way, I’ll never know.

If anyone was there during that time frame or other times, I’d love to hear from you. Even if you were a Rock Kid and even the LE troop I mentioned.

I’ll find some way to apologize…

I was there July 85 to 86.

If Thor is Curtis we flew out at the same time when we left. Many many pics of him. LOL

Lot of pics of the wig wearing folks too. But it was during party time at my room or others.

I think the terrible personal hygiene troop lived right across from me in the hut. :tape2

I'd forgot about the starlings.

Bychance
03-30-2013, 12:50 PM
It was definitely a memorable experience though, and I'm glad I experienced it.

I was there 85-86 on the duck and feel the same way. Glad I experienced it.

Absinthe Anecdote
03-30-2013, 02:38 PM
I was there July 85 to 86.

If Thor is Curtis we flew out at the same time when we left. Many many pics of him. LOL

Lot of pics of the wig wearing folks too. But it was during party time at my room or others.

I think the terrible personal hygiene troop lived right across from me in the hut. :tape2

I'd forgot about the starlings.

I’m sure we know each other because I rotated out in June that same year.

You lived across the hall from Cujo? Were you in the corner room beside the hallway to the latrines and the Tuck Room?

If so, I think I know who you are. I think I pissed you off one night because J. Faye and I put a musical Hallmark card inside the fire alarm bell beside your room. You couldn’t figure out where the music was coming from and you were trying to get some sleep.

Yes, I do believe Thor’s real name was Curtis although I can’t recall if it was his first or last name.

Thor was on A Flight and used to hang out with a guy called Udo, real name was Booden or Bowen?

Those two were inseparable for the most part of their tour and spent the better part of the winter playing some elaborate WWII strategy game called Squad Leader in their room. There was another A Flight guy that hung around them named Elliot (Last name?)

I was only an A1C on that tour and didn’t really mix with the Rock Kids. I think they were all SSgts except for one of them, so I was a little leery of them.

The only “Rock Kid” that I every talked to was a big tall guy with blonde hair and a very fair skinned complexion, he wasn’t a cop, he was our Admin troop.

Bychance
03-30-2013, 09:09 PM
My room was the last room on the right side all the way at the end on left side of hallway. Your prank must be on someone else.

Cujo was a short white guy right if so I didnt live across from him, unless I am confusing myself? The guy I am talking about was black and lived all the way on the end on right side and right side of hall. Maybe cujo was his roommate? I cant really remember anymore.

Curtis was 1st name Thorton or Thronton last. Scott 1st name for udo

Bychance
03-30-2013, 09:15 PM
I'll post a pic of me. Because I cant even remember my flight right now. SSgt Hendershot was the flight chief of my flight.

http://i59.photobucket.com/albums/g289/doemaster789/CopyofTurkey.jpg

VFFTSGT
03-30-2013, 10:06 PM
Had orders there...even flew around the world to go. Never made it.

Absinthe Anecdote
03-30-2013, 10:14 PM
I'll post a pic of me. Because I cant even remember my flight right now. SSgt Hendershot was the flight chief of my flight.

http://i59.photobucket.com/albums/g289/doemaster789/CopyofTurkey.jpg

I remember driving that truck you are standing in front of and I remember Hendershot, a big muscular guy, but I can’t place your name.

Yes, Cujo was a short fat white guy and had horrible personal hygiene. I’m pretty sure Cujo was the LE troop for D Flight so maybe you where on B Flight?

I was on C flight (I think) our Flight Chief was SSgt Novick. I was the only CSC controller on our flight for a long time and didn’t get to do much patrolling.

During our year there the space shuttle Challenger blew up and so did Chernobyl, remember?

Do you remember when that bus that got rear ended by a truck on the road in front of base?

Or the bottle of Raki that got dropped on the floor of the Tuck Room?

I have a handful of photos from that tour that need to be scanned. I'll see if I can dig them up.

Bychance
03-31-2013, 05:17 AM
Novick was in Malmstrom MT when I was there and later in Turkey. Knew him from both places.

I was a CSC also and covered for another flight so their csc could take a break.

Big muscular guy wasnt Hendershot. That was Tim Lawrence asst flight chief as a Sgt.

There was one worse then cujo that lived across from me. You could smell him in the hallway with him inside his room.

I pretty much stayed toasted with Thor and others, so basically everything isnt logged into my memory. Lumpy a new LE troop has been refreshing my memory of some of the stuff I have forgotten.

By the way my name was Kevin Smith. Glenn Harris was my roommate and on same flight too.

Absinthe Anecdote
03-31-2013, 01:22 PM
Novick was in Malmstrom MT when I was there and later in Turkey. Knew him from both places.

I was a CSC also and covered for another flight so their csc could take a break.

Big muscular guy wasnt Hendershot. That was Tim Lawrence asst flight chief as a Sgt.

There was one worse then cujo that lived across from me. You could smell him in the hallway with him inside his room.

I pretty much stayed toasted with Thor and others, so basically everything isnt logged into my memory. Lumpy a new LE troop has been refreshing my memory of some of the stuff I have forgotten.

By the way my name was Kevin Smith. Glenn Harris was my roommate and on same flight too.

I also knew Novick from Malmstrom and was on the same flight with him in the Base Security Squadron.

I had forgotten about Lumpy! He went downtown with a big group of us one time and a couple of Turks came up to him and started squeezing his man boobs. We were laughing so hard it made the situation worse as it emboldened the Turks to keep at him until he took a swing at one of them.

What a screwed up year that was but in retrospect it served a purpose. I think the majority of people there had volunteered for world-wide remote just to escape a SAC base and get a good follow-on assignment.

Bychance
03-31-2013, 03:51 PM
Absinthe Anecdote new PM. I think I got a pic of you. Post or not?

Absinthe Anecdote
03-31-2013, 04:12 PM
Absinthe Anecdote new PM. I think I got a pic of you. Post or not?

Sure go ahead!

Bychance
03-31-2013, 08:09 PM
I'm going to take a pic of the pic or pics instead of scanning each one in.

Bychance
03-31-2013, 08:45 PM
In this small group pic looking at pic udo is on right on ground and you on left beside udo on ground? I am standing behind udo with white football jersey with red football and lettering.

http://i59.photobucket.com/albums/g289/doemaster789/gtgpics/turkey8586006_zps3c61c041.jpg

Bychance
03-31-2013, 08:50 PM
Just a few on the many of 100's of pics I have. Only showing ones that are ok IMO. Lot of them are in my room. 1 is in Thors room.

http://i59.photobucket.com/albums/g289/doemaster789/gtgpics/turkey8586003_zps254afcc9.jpg
http://i59.photobucket.com/albums/g289/doemaster789/gtgpics/turkey8586007_zps8fd409a1.jpg
http://i59.photobucket.com/albums/g289/doemaster789/gtgpics/turkey8586008_zpsa32c94cd.jpg
http://i59.photobucket.com/albums/g289/doemaster789/gtgpics/turkey8586009_zps6811b763.jpg
http://i59.photobucket.com/albums/g289/doemaster789/gtgpics/turkey8586013_zpsaa5426df.jpg
http://i59.photobucket.com/albums/g289/doemaster789/gtgpics/turkey8586012_zps264d5a56.jpg

Absinthe Anecdote
03-31-2013, 09:50 PM
What a blast from the past!

Yes, that is me on the ground beside Udo. I’m also the wearing the light blue hoodie and in the picture to the immediate right of it.

Now that I see a close up of you I definitely remember you!

The guy in the foreground of the picture with Lumpy was named Kirby, looks like it was on top of the wall in Diyarbikur…

Wasn’t the guy sticking his tongue out another Malmstrom person? If memory serves me right he was a SSgt and told stories about being at RAF Bentwaters during the alleged UFO incident.

I’m pretty sure I remember the day those photos of Udo and the other guy wearing Class A’s were taken, BTZ board or AoQ board?

Joe Faye and I got to go to Incirlik to compete in round two later that week… Of course we went out and got trashed the night before and didn’t win anything...

Lots of memories about how drunkenly wild that barracks was… It was a miracle nothing really bad happened… Remember all the holes getting knocked into the walls?

Do you remember how the people who rotated out a couple of months after we got there would get drunk and climb the water tower?

Bychance
03-31-2013, 10:30 PM
Guy with tongue out sitting with white sleeveless t-shirt is SSgt Hendershot my flight chief back then.

Blues was for some kind of Ataturk day formation that all of us had to do.

If you look there is 4 pics I threw in of you.

Lumpy and me are suppose to hook up when the weather gets nice. Rehash the bygone days.

Absinthe Anecdote
03-31-2013, 11:00 PM
I didn't even recognize myself!

Too funny!

Retired Oldtimer
05-31-2013, 04:40 PM
I was there from the middle of September 1980 through the last week of September 1981. Had to stay 2 extra weeks because the people that were supposed to replace me kept "Retiring in lieu of assignment". Have lot of stories about the "Duck". Will tell them later!

Retired Oldtimer
05-31-2013, 05:36 PM
Martial law was declared in Turkey 2 or 3 weeks after I arrived there. This caused a near panic at some of the U.S. Military sites in Turkey. At the "Duck" they issued us M-16s, helmets, and flak vests. I worked in the Commcenter (Crypto Accountant/Assistant NCOIC) and I was a TSgt at the time. We had to get all of the crypto stuff ready to be destroyed, but in the end we did not destroy anything. I heard later on that at least one of the Army sites did destroy some of their crypto stuff. Don't know if that was true or not! The Turkish Air Force sent a couple of truck loads of Turkish Air Force GIs (with a couple of big guns on wheels) up to our site and pointed the big guns inward towards us. After about an hour or so they turned the guns around and pointed them outward.
While I was there we never had enough people to work in the Commcenter. One time we got USAFE to send us a couple of people TDY to work in the Commcenter, but one of them was pregnant and soon pointed out to us that she felt it was not safe for her or her baby to be on the "Duck" because of the powerful radar ball (which we called "Betty") that we had on the site. She was probably right as I remember having to build a copper wire box to put my radio/cassette player in so I could play the tapes. Every time "Betty" rotated, it literally obliterated any hope of receiving any radio broadcasts or even playing my tapes (if the radio/cassette player was outside of the box). We also had a drug bust while I was there and 2 or 3 of my teletype/DSTE operators lost their security clearances and were immediately shipped out of Turkey to Germany.

Retired Oldtimer
05-31-2013, 05:48 PM
I remember the village right next to our site. The houses were built out of rock and mud. I remember that they had what looked like grass on their roofs and put their clothes lines on the roof. One time the village had a shooting incident which got completely out of control. After the incident was over, I heard that it was caused by a village man beating his wife. Apparently she got tired of it and went next door and got a gun. She started shooting at her husband. We had Turkish askeirs (not sure of spelling/Turkish Air Force draftees) providing security around the site. Well, the askeirs thought that they were being fired upon and started shooting at the village. I vividly remember walking out of my old French metal barracks that morning and hearing pinging off the metal wall above my head. That spot wound up with 2 or 3 bullet holes in it. Eventually, the Turkish Air Force sent some troops from the air base in Diyarbakir up to our site. They rounded up everyone in the village and took all of their guns away from them (that was the story that I heard).

Retired Oldtimer
05-31-2013, 06:05 PM
I also have a lot of other memories from my time on the "Duck". I remember dogs getting onto the site to scavenge in our garbage dump and the Turkish askeirs shooting at them. Also, remember the giant storks that nested and had babies on the site. I especially remember getting pooped on when I got too close to their nests, which were on top of these huge metal poles on the site. I also remember keeping a healthy distance from the giant storks while they were walking around on the ground. Saw them chasing the Turkish commander's sheep around many times. Speaking of sheep, one morning I was going to work and when I opened the barracks door to leave this sheep just came walking in like he owned the place. I had to spend 10 minutes chasing that sheep up and down the hallway before I got him to go back outside.

Retired Oldtimer
05-31-2013, 06:14 PM
I don't remember any Air Force Security Police being at the "Duck" while I was there (1980 - 81). Security was strictly all askeirs. Random thought: I remember the Turkish sergeants eating in the chow hall with at least one askeir standing at attention next to them. These askeirs were treated as personal servants to the sergeants. We had two American civilian companies on the site. They were General Electric and Boeing Services International. GE provided the people for the computers and the radars. Boeing provided people for the chow hall and TMO. We had one GE guy that seemed to stay intoxicated all of the time (think he was a computer programmer or maintenance guy). He used to pass out in one of the big lounge chairs in the Club quite often. During the winter some of the guys got together and picked up his chair (he was passed out) with him in it and put it outside. It was snowing at the time. Within 5 or 10 minutes one of the Air Force officers came into the Club and told several GIs to go outside and bring that guy back inside. At the time, it seemed funny, but I guess that it could have turned into a tragedy. That's all for now. Will be back later.

Retired Oldtimer
06-01-2013, 04:10 PM
Pirinclik random thoughts: While I was there the guy in charge of the General Electric personnel was a small guy named DeGhanges (not sure of spelling). People said that he had been there 14 or 15 years. I took up jogging while I was there. Used to jog around the inner perimeter of the fence, except for the area close to the village. Had village women throw rocks at me a couple of times when I came too close to the fence. Guess they felt that I was indecent because I was only wearing shorts and running shoes. I remember the trees next to the old French metal barracks. In the day time every inch of every limb on those trees were filled up with small bats. At night every inch of every limb was filled up with birds. I soon learned to stay out from under those trees in order to keep from getting pooped on. Had Diarrhea off and on the whole time I was there. Pretty sure it was from eating in the chow hall. Lost 25 pounds while I was there. The last 3 months I was there I stopped going to the chow hall. Lived on a diet of beanie weinnies, crackers, vienna sausage, cigarettes, and alcohol. Since then I have given up cigarettes and alcohol.

Absinthe Anecdote
06-01-2013, 09:02 PM
I don't remember any Air Force Security Police being at the "Duck" while I was there (1980 - 81). Security was strictly all askeirs. Random thought: I remember the Turkish sergeants eating in the chow hall with at least one askeir standing at attention next to them. These askeirs were treated as personal servants to the sergeants. We had two American civilian companies on the site. They were General Electric and Boeing Services International. GE provided the people for the computers and the radars. Boeing provided people for the chow hall and TMO. We had one GE guy that seemed to stay intoxicated all of the time (think he was a computer programmer or maintenance guy). He used to pass out in one of the big lounge chairs in the Club quite often. During the winter some of the guys got together and picked up his chair (he was passed out) with him in it and put it outside. It was snowing at the time. Within 5 or 10 minutes one of the Air Force officers came into the Club and told several GIs to go outside and bring that guy back inside. At the time, it seemed funny, but I guess that it could have turned into a tragedy. That's all for now. Will be back later.

I would imagine the AF Cops were there back then. I was there only four years later (1985) and we were the biggest contingent on base. If I remember right there were about 150 total people (contractors and AF personnel) out of that 44 were cops.

Who provided entry control to the two restricted areas when you were there?

I can’t imagine that they let the Turks do that but then again, who knows.

When we would patrol the perimeter it wasn’t uncommon for them to throw a rock at our vehicle but their aim was terrible. I think the reason they did that was because they were Kurds and since we where allies with the Turks they didn’t like us much either.

Mostly the kids would want trade stuff with us. They always offered to trade a goat for a football (soccer ball), I never knew of anybody actually getting a goat from them. They would be so happy if you gave pens and pencils to them. One of our guys was always tossing handfuls of candy over the fence to them and they absolutely went nuts for that. Mostly the kids from that village were ok.

However, you had to watch yourself downtown because the Kurds would through garbage at you if the situation was right. I had a kid walk up to the taxi I was riding in and take a big bite out of a tomato and spit it on me. One of my buddies got hit by a water melon rind and another had a bucket of dirty water dumped out of a window on him.

Anyway, some of those contractors were strange guys. I heard one of them murdered a female TSgt in the barracks in 1992.

I remember another one who walked around with a notebook and would keep a log of every penny he spent. Rumor had it he had been there for years and was trying to save 2 million to retire. I hope he made it.

Here is a fun little exercise, go on Google Earth and try to find the base! It is pretty easy to find if you remember the roads from Diyarbakir to base. It is slightly to the North and West of Diyarbakir about 10 to 15 miles.

The OTH Radar and Betty are gone but the buildings are there. A few of the old metal Quonset huts are still there and the swimming pool is covered in green moss.

Retired Oldtimer
06-02-2013, 12:46 AM
I am pretty sure we never had any security police at Pirinclik while I was there. I never saw any roving patrols of Security Police on foot or in vehicles. I never saw the askeirs drive around in a vehicle. They always stayed at their raised outhouses, which were spaced every so many yards around the inside of the perimeter. I don't remember ever seeing anyone drive around the interior perimeter fence. While I was there I believe that we had around 90 Americans and a bunch of askeirs. You asked about who provided access to the two restricted areas? I only know of one restricted area on the site itself. That was where I worked (the Commcenter and Radar Ops were in the same building). You walked through a turn style and then had a number reader next to the door of the building. You punched in the code and the door released. I think that the radar ops people had their own entrance on another part of the building but I can't remember where it was located. Of course, the whole building was surrounded by a fence. Next to the building where I worked was burn facility (also inside the fence). The front entrance to the site was manned by askeirs. We were under martial law while I was there. We were not allowed to leave the site to go downtown. The exception was: Once a week I got on a bright blue Air Force bus and went to the Turkish Air Base in Diyarbakir to meet a C-130 that flew in from Incirlik. I met it to pick up crypto material. While I was there: if you went on leave you had to leave country. No leaves permitted to tour around Turkey. I heard about the female getting murdered, but I can't remember where (maybe it was here). You are right about some of the contractors that worked there. The guys that worked for GE worked 12 hours a day, 7 days week. I am not sure what the hours were for the Boeing Services International contractors, but I know that the guy in charge of the Transportation Management Office (TMO) worked around 40 hours per week, unless an airplane come in on the weekend.Yes, I have seen the Google Earth picture of Pirinclik. I could r

Retired Oldtimer
06-02-2013, 12:53 AM
I could recognize a few of the buildings. It is funny I hated it when I was there because we were undermanned and were just starting to get some of the stuff (equipment, supplies, etc.) that the Turkish government had held back before the Military Coup occurred. I will probably remember things about the "Duck" after all of the other Air Force memories are gone. I was in the Air Force 22 years and spent 11 years and 3 months overseas, but the memories about the "Duck" seem to stand out the most in my mind! Anyway, got to go!

Absinthe Anecdote
06-02-2013, 01:38 PM
I am pretty sure we never had any security police at Pirinclik while I was there. I never saw any roving patrols of Security Police on foot or in vehicles. I never saw the askeirs drive around in a vehicle. They always stayed at their raised outhouses, which were spaced every so many yards around the inside of the perimeter. I don't remember ever seeing anyone drive around the interior perimeter fence. While I was there I believe that we had around 90 Americans and a bunch of askeirs. You asked about who provided access to the two restricted areas? I only know of one restricted area on the site itself. That was where I worked (the Commcenter and Radar Ops were in the same building). You walked through a turn style and then had a number reader next to the door of the building. You punched in the code and the door released. I think that the radar ops people had their own entrance on another part of the building but I can't remember where it was located. Of course, the whole building was surrounded by a fence. Next to the building where I worked was burn facility (also inside the fence). The front entrance to the site was manned by askeirs. We were under martial law while I was there. We were not allowed to leave the site to go downtown. The exception was: Once a week I got on a bright blue Air Force bus and went to the Turkish Air Base in Diyarbakir to meet a C-130 that flew in from Incirlik. I met it to pick up crypto material. While I was there: if you went on leave you had to leave country. No leaves permitted to tour around Turkey. I heard about the female getting murdered, but I can't remember where (maybe it was here). You are right about some of the contractors that worked there. The guys that worked for GE worked 12 hours a day, 7 days week. I am not sure what the hours were for the Boeing Services International contractors, but I know that the guy in charge of the Transportation Management Office (TMO) worked around 40 hours per week, unless an airplane come in on the weekend.Yes, I have seen the Google Earth picture of Pirinclik. I could r

Interesting, I wonder if it had anything to do with the political turmoil during the time you were there?

Life on that tiny little base could get downright monotonous and at least we were allowed to go downtown and explore a little.

For about half the year I was there the runway at Diyarbikur was closed for repairs and we had to pick up the mail from the airport in Batman. You left base early in the morning and didn’t get back until late afternoon, I went out there two or three times.

Since one of the Turks from transportation drove, one time four or five of us tagged along and took a cooler full of beer. It sucked going there alone because you had to sign for the mail from the flight that arrived in the morning and then wait for the afternoon flight before you could go home.

Batman looked like a Kurdish version of the Wild West in the 1980’s, dirt streets with cattle and sheep herders moving their flocks around and a whole bunch of tough looking hombres sitting around drinking chai.

Mr. Happy
06-02-2013, 02:44 PM
In '91 I did a stint at Batman. Pretty desolate location and the base was pretty Spartan.

Retired Oldtimer
06-02-2013, 03:13 PM
As far as the political turmoil in Turkey at the time I was there: I was told and read that before I got there in 1980 the Turkish civilian government was upset with the U.S. Government (can't remember what about) and had restricted a lot of things that we could do. For example, equipment and supplies coming to the U.S. Military in Turkey was restricted severely or stopped entirely. We were always short of supplies or it seemed to take forever to receive anything. Letters I wrote to my wife or parents (who lived in California) took 7 to 10 days to get there. Of course, we did not have the internet or e-mail back then. We did have a direct shot uplink to satellites, so every American on the site got to call back to States once a week for about 15 minutes. I think that being isolated for so long affected a person's mental attitude. It certainly seemed to encourage drinking a lot! After the Turkish military staged a military coup in October of 1980 the supplies and things that we needed seemed to arrive much sooner than before.

Absinthe Anecdote
06-02-2013, 03:22 PM
In '91 I did a stint at Batman. Pretty desolate location and the base was pretty Spartan.

There are a lot of ancient ruins (Hanskeyef) around Batman that are soon to be or already have been submerged by a hydro-electric dam project.

I got to catch a glimpse of some of them on the van ride into Batman.

We did get to stop and look at a beautiful bridge built by the Byzantines over the Tigress River. I would have loved to have seen more of that stuff.

I’m assuming you were at Batman during Desert Storm; were you able to break away to check out Hanskeyef?

Retired Oldtimer
06-02-2013, 03:30 PM
I don't remember ever getting to Batman, but I can visualize what it must have been like from your description. When I left Turkey on a C-130 I do remember that we stopped at two Army sites before we got to Incirlik. I think that they were Erhach and Malatya (not sure about this). I do remember that we landed on the side of a mountain or large hill at one of them. The runway wasn't even close to being level. I am not good at estimating angles of degree, but that runway was definitely going up hill. When we landed there, two truckloads of U.S. Army troops came out to the plane in M-35 (3 axle diesel) trucks and unloaded there stuff from the plane in about 10 minutes. They really seemed happy to see us. We always thought of ourselves as being really isolated, but we used to have U.S. Army guys come down to the duck for R & R. They thought that we were a luxury resort! Ha! Ha! At the time, the "Duck" had a 3 lane bowling alley (not sure about the number of lanes), a 3 hole golf course, swimming pool, couple of tennis courts, gym with basketball court and weight room, wood working shop, one or two softball diamonds, an audio shop (where you could record 33 1/3 records onto cassette tapes), and of course, the Club.

Absinthe Anecdote
06-02-2013, 03:31 PM
As far as the political turmoil in Turkey at the time I was there: I was told and read that before I got there in 1980 the Turkish civilian government was upset with the U.S. Government (can't remember what about) and had restricted a lot of things that we could do. For example, equipment and supplies coming to the U.S. Military in Turkey was restricted severely or stopped entirely. We were always short of supplies or it seemed to take forever to receive anything. Letters I wrote to my wife or parents (who lived in California) took 7 to 10 days to get there. Of course, we did not have the internet or e-mail back then. We did have a direct shot uplink to satellites, so every American on the site got to call back to States once a week for about 15 minutes. I think that being isolated for so long affected a person's mental attitude. It certainly seemed to encourage drinking a lot! After the Turkish military staged a military coup in October of 1980 the supplies and things that we needed seemed to arrive much sooner than before.

My friend Google tells me that relations were strained by the Turkish invasion of Cyprus in the 1970s and then further complicated when Reagan took office. Ronald Reagan was sympathetic to the Armenian cause and is the last American to have officially recognized the Armenian Genocide.

Relations had improved vastly by the time I got there in 1985.

Retired Oldtimer
06-02-2013, 03:41 PM
I wish that I could have got to get out and look around Turkey, but I was only there 2 or 3 weeks before they declared Martial Law and restricted everything. Before that happened, I did take a bus ride (about 4 hours) to a Mountain called Arayat (not sure about the spelling). On the top of that mountain were a bunch of statues (looked like ancient Greece statues). No, I was already retired (1988) when Desert Storm happened. Oops, my wife wants me to go do something. Will be back later.

TJMAC77SP
06-02-2013, 05:56 PM
My friend Google tells me that relations were strained by the Turkish invasion of Cyprus in the 1970s and then further complicated when Reagan took office. Ronald Reagan was sympathetic to the Armenian cause and is the last American to have officially recognized the Armenian Genocide.

Relations had improved vastly by the time I got there in 1985.

The US embargoed arms to Turkey when they invaded Cyprus in 1974 (which some might argue they had a right to do). They retaliated by severely restricting incoming mail and BX shipments. Remnants of this were still in effect through 1980. Things got very tense for a few weeks in September of 1980 when the military took over the government (again). It was interesting times to be stationed in Turkey to say the least (Incirlik 1979-1980).

Absinthe Anecdote
06-02-2013, 06:31 PM
The US embargoed arms to Turkey when they invaded Cyprus in 1974 (which some might argue they had a right to do). They retaliated by severely restricting incoming mail and BX shipments. Remnants of this were still in effect through 1980. Things got very tense for a few weeks in September of 1980 when the military took over the government (again). It was interesting times to be stationed in Turkey to say the least (Incirlik 1979-1980).

Were you a cop back then?

Absinthe Anecdote
06-02-2013, 06:50 PM
I wish that I could have got to get out and look around Turkey, but I was only there 2 or 3 weeks before they declared Martial Law and restricted everything. Before that happened, I did take a bus ride (about 4 hours) to a Mountain called Arayat (not sure about the spelling). On the top of that mountain were a bunch of statues (looked like ancient Greece statues). No, I was already retired (1988) when Desert Storm happened. Oops, my wife wants me to go do something. Will be back later.

What Greek statues but no Ark?

I don’t think this is the same Mt Ararat you are talking about because I doubt you went to the top as it is over 16,000 ft and covered in snow year round. Plus, the eastern slope looked down on the old Soviet Union back in 1980. It was off limits to travel in 1985 because of PKK activity.

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/df/Kohrvirab.jpg/300px-Kohrvirab.jpg

Absinthe Anecdote
06-02-2013, 07:36 PM
As far as the political turmoil in Turkey at the time I was there: I was told and read that before I got there in 1980 the Turkish civilian government was upset with the U.S. Government (can't remember what about) and had restricted a lot of things that we could do. For example, equipment and supplies coming to the U.S. Military in Turkey was restricted severely or stopped entirely. We were always short of supplies or it seemed to take forever to receive anything. Letters I wrote to my wife or parents (who lived in California) took 7 to 10 days to get there. Of course, we did not have the internet or e-mail back then. We did have a direct shot uplink to satellites, so every American on the site got to call back to States once a week for about 15 minutes. I think that being isolated for so long affected a person's mental attitude. It certainly seemed to encourage drinking a lot! After the Turkish military staged a military coup in October of 1980 the supplies and things that we needed seemed to arrive much sooner than before.

I just remembered that President Reagan called the site on Christmas Eve 1984 (before I got there) and one of the cops in my unit got to talk to him.
The Duck had plenty of comm links back to NORAD.

Retired Oldtimer
06-02-2013, 10:03 PM
You are absolutely right! I don't know why I thought it was Mt Ararat. I went back and did some research through all of my old pictures and found the name of the mountain (or big hill) that I went to. It is Mt Nemrut, which is close to the city of Ahlat (which which sits on the west side of Lake Van). According to Google Maps, Mt. Nemrut is 247 kilometers east of Diyarbakir. If you go to Google Images and type in Mt Nemrut statues you will see pictures of statues that I saw when I was there. Sorry about the mixup! Oh, also sorry for thinking that they were Greek statues.

OtisRNeedleman
06-02-2013, 10:12 PM
This thread makes me glad I was never stationed in Turkey.

Mr. Happy
06-03-2013, 02:24 AM
There are a lot of ancient ruins (Hanskeyef) around Batman that are soon to be or already have been submerged by a hydro-electric dam project.

I got to catch a glimpse of some of them on the van ride into Batman.

We did get to stop and look at a beautiful bridge built by the Byzantines over the Tigress River. I would have loved to have seen more of that stuff.

I’m assuming you were at Batman during Desert Storm; were you able to break away to check out Hanskeyef?

Right after Desert Storm for Provide Comfort. Didn't get much leisure time off the base, but we did drive down to Silopi on the Iraq border where there was another coalition helicopter base set up. The coalition had free reign inside Northern Iraq for humanitarian relief ops, so we were able to just drive across the border and check out the Kurdish refugee camps inside Iraq and some abandon Iraqi military sites. There was tons of helmets and ordnance laying around. On the drive down there, I remember seeing ancient ruins as you mentioned...I thought they might had been Roman. There was a cool looking ancient bridge in Zakho, Iraq too over the Tigress River. Once we closed down Batman, we had to drive clear across Turkey back to Incirlik; that was definitely some pucker factor. It was rough living conditions for 6 months, but it created lifelong memories for me.

TJMAC77SP
06-03-2013, 10:51 AM
Were you a cop back then?

Yes................

JD2780
06-03-2013, 11:39 AM
My wife has mentioned she wouldn't mind turkey. I told her I don't want my kids going not to turkey. Ever.

TJMAC77SP
06-03-2013, 12:22 PM
My wife has mentioned she wouldn't mind turkey. I told her I don't want my kids going not to turkey. Ever.

I agree. Not under the current adminstration and any like it.

Bychance
07-31-2013, 06:50 PM
I didn't even recognize myself!

Too funny!

Just a update.

Me standing on left side and Lumpy the guy in the wig with qtips in his nose hooked up at my place for a mini duck reunion to rehash old times. Families think we were nuts with some of our stories.

http://i59.photobucket.com/albums/g289/doemaster789/gtgpics/turkey8586009_zps6811b763.jpg

Absinthe Anecdote
07-31-2013, 07:25 PM
That's great, tell Lumpy that I said hello!

My most vivid memory of Lumpy is the night I came into CSC for a mid-shift and he was talking about the space shuttle Challenger exploding.

Absinthe Anecdote
05-31-2015, 03:29 PM
I'm bumping this thread in response to a PM from someone who is trying to post in it.

Mjölnir
05-31-2015, 06:13 PM
No current comments pending approval (usually for a new / unverified member.)

Let me know if there are problems posting.