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Rusty Jones
03-24-2012, 01:06 AM
"The brow is now open for normal traffic."
This is normally passed after the brow has been secured. What I'm wondering is why they don't say "the brow is now open for traffic." Why do they have to say NORMAL traffic? Can the brow be open for ABNORMAL traffic?

"There are divers working over the side. Do not throw anything over the side..."
Does this mean that when the divers secure, that we CAN throw things over the side?

"Khaki and above"
Huh? Is there some third group of uniforms that I'm not aware of?

"Uniform for getting underway is coveralls and ballcaps for E6 and below, and coveralls and ballcaps for E7 and above."
I suppose everyone on the ship is too stupid to know what "all hands" means, so let's be more specific.

"Full bird captain"
As opposed to what? A half bird captain?

Any others you can think of?

Greg
03-24-2012, 01:27 AM
"The brow is now open for normal traffic."
This is normally passed after the brow has been secured. What I'm wondering is why they don't say "the brow is now open for traffic." Why do they have to say NORMAL traffic? Can the brow be open for ABNORMAL traffic?

Normal traffic includes transport of items off/on the ship that will NOT impede or block access for others.

"There are divers working over the side. Do not throw anything over the side..."
Does this mean that when the divers secure, that we CAN throw things over the side?

Sure, just don't get caught in your FTN moment.

"Khaki and above"
Huh? Is there some third group of uniforms that I'm not aware of?

"Uniform for getting underway is coveralls and ballcaps for E6 and below, and coveralls and ballcaps for E7 and above."
I suppose everyone on the ship is too stupid to know what "all hands" means, so let's be more specific.

"Full bird captain"
As opposed to what? A half bird captain?

Full bird captain= O-6; captain= C.O.

Any others you can think of?

But that's just me.

Greg
03-24-2012, 01:42 AM
BTW, what happened to:

"There are divers working over the side, do not rotate screws, cycle rudders, take suction from or discharge to the sea while divers are working over the side."

Rusty Jones
03-24-2012, 02:49 AM
BTW, what happened to:

"There are divers working over the side, do not rotate screws, cycle rudders, take suction from or discharge to the sea while divers are working over the side."

That's how my last command passed it. The phraseology was different on my first ship. It was "There are divers working over the side. Do not throw anything over the side. Do not rotate screws, cycle rudders, jack main engines, take suction from or discharge to the sea, or operate any underwater electrical equipment without first contacting the chief engineer and the diving supervisor.""

Rusty Jones
03-24-2012, 02:51 AM
Normal traffic includes transport of items off/on the ship that will NOT impede or block access for others.

Then what would be "abnormal" traffic? Does the word ever get passed that "the brow is now open for abnormal traffic"?


Full bird captain= O-6; captain= C.O.

Right, but why is the word "full" inserted? Why can't they just be a "bird" captain?

Mr. Squid
03-24-2012, 04:00 AM
"Full Bird Captain" is incoherent and incorrect. "Full Bird" originally stems from the slang "Full Bird Colonel", being of course a step up from LtCol or "Light Bird Colonel". At some point or another, terminology from other brances creeped into Navy lingo and in the process, some words and phrases came about that make no real sense.

"Khaki and above". Yea, that's E-7 and above obviously. You know how those in the goat locker like to segregate themselves in every humanly conceivable manner as if they're not entirely enlisted anymore or something, and that psychological mindset just somehow permeated itself throughout the Navy over the generations. That's just Navy culture, take it for what it is.

I was actually mixed up on at least one term off the top of my head. I thought scuttlebutt was just a drinking fountain, but at some point in the past it referred to gossip and rumors, as in, things casually discussed in those brief moments of taking a break and going for a drink at the scuttlebutt. I didn't know that for the longest time, probably because I never heard anyone use it in daily life.

imported_WINTHORP1
03-24-2012, 07:00 AM
Global Force for Good

Greg
03-24-2012, 11:27 AM
Global Force for Good

Back in the mid-70's it was: "Sailor's have more fun" on bumper stickers.
Guys would cut-out the first half of the "m" plus the "r" and "e" entirely so it would read, "Sailors have 'no' fun."

Rusty Jones
03-24-2012, 11:31 AM
Here's another:

"BMCS, BMCM"
Boatswain's Mate Chief Senior? Boatswain's Mate Chief Master? Why does the "S" or the "M" come after the "C"?

Rusty Jones
03-24-2012, 11:34 AM
Or how about this:

"AD = Aviation Machinist's Mate"
Where does the "D" come from?

Greg
03-24-2012, 11:41 AM
Here's another:

"BMCS, BMCM"
Boatswain's Mate Chief Senior? Boatswain's Mate Chief Master? Why does the "S" or the "M" come after the "C"?

You need to become a "C" before reaching "S" let alone "M" status?

Rusty Jones
03-24-2012, 11:46 AM
You need to become a "C" before reaching "S" let alone "M" status?

Then why CPO, SCPO, and MCPO?

Greg
03-24-2012, 03:22 PM
Then why CPO, SCPO, and MCPO?

Job before rank, as in BMCM and then MCPO...and it's the Navy?

Rusty Jones
03-24-2012, 03:38 PM
Job before rank, as in BMCM and then MCPO...and it's the Navy?

Initially when I first joined the Navy, I assumed that it ended in "CS" and "CM," because Senior Chief and Master Chief was somehow "Latinized." Kind of like PhD = Doctor of Philosophy, but the reason the "Ph" comes before the "D" is because PhD actually stands for "Philosophiae Doctor."

TJMAC77SP
03-24-2012, 03:40 PM
Seamen on the poopdeck?

Greg
03-24-2012, 04:18 PM
Seamen on the poopdeck?

The fast frigate I was stationed on was in B.M.I.P., Boston Marine Industrial Park, in 1978-79 for work on the propulsion plant.
I would go on liberty downtown and stroll through the Commons, would that, by the same token, be considered "seaman on the lawn?"

This was at the time, considered to be part of the "red-light district."

TJMAC77SP
03-25-2012, 01:15 PM
The fast frigate I was stationed on was in B.M.I.P., Boston Marine Industrial Park, in 1978-79 for work on the propulsion plant.
I would go on liberty downtown and stroll through the Commons, would that, by the same token, be considered "seaman on the lawn?"

This was at the time, considered to be part of the "red-light district."

Good One....

A couple of blocks from the Commons....The Combat Zone......Washington Street around Boylston. I worked nights near there just before I enlisted. Very interesting times.

CORNELIUSSEON
03-25-2012, 02:09 PM
"The brow is now open for normal traffic."
This is normally passed after the brow has been secured. What I'm wondering is why they don't say "the brow is now open for traffic." Why do they have to say NORMAL traffic? Can the brow be open for ABNORMAL traffic?

"There are divers working over the side. Do not throw anything over the side..."
Does this mean that when the divers secure, that we CAN throw things over the side?

"Khaki and above"
Huh? Is there some third group of uniforms that I'm not aware of?

"Uniform for getting underway is coveralls and ballcaps for E6 and below, and coveralls and ballcaps for E7 and above."
I suppose everyone on the ship is too stupid to know what "all hands" means, so let's be more specific.

"Full bird captain"
As opposed to what? A half bird captain?

Any others you can think of?

What you have here is a case of the verbal diarrhea that tasks the American language. The Army has been plagued with examples as well.

Mess - which is a word that describes the place for meals and camaraderie lasted for more than 200 years, only to be replaced by several different phrases.

The Closed Mess - both the Officers Closed Mess and the Enlisted Closed mess - were replaced by the Unit Mess, and then by the Dining Facility.

The Open Mess - again the Enlisted and Officers Open Mess - were replaced by the Enlisted Club, the NCO Club, the Officers Club, and - lately - the Community Club.

The term Sick Call hails from the days when a specific Bugle Call was sounded to announce the start of the period for going for ordinary medical care. The phrase stuck as the name for the event, and now has lost the connection with the actual call.

There are many others.

Greg
03-25-2012, 03:56 PM
Good One....

A couple of blocks from the Commons....The Combat Zone......Washington Street around Boylston. I worked nights near there just before I enlisted. Very interesting times.

Checking-out the three piece shark skin suits and pinkie rings while drinking in Good Time Charley's.
Sneaking in a pint of Jack Daniels tucked in the waistband of my levi's while drinking over priced drafts watching the "show" at the NakedEye. Great times in Beantown!

SeaLawyer
03-26-2012, 11:09 AM
Or how about this:

"AD = Aviation Machinist's Mate"
Where does the "D" come from?

Good Question Rusty... and one that I, myself, asked many many moons ago.

In the early beginnings of Naval Aviation, Enlisted personnel that went into the aviation field were "Aviation Designated"; hence, the rating "AD". Of course, as time progressed, aircraft became more complex requiring specialization in the areas of electronics, hydraulics, etc. Because engine mechanics were the primary aviation source, they retained the designation as "AD".

Although I can't guarantee 100% accuracy of my information or copy right (or wrong) laws, I've found no other evidence to counter this information.

Anyone else heard otherwise?

Chief Bosun
03-26-2012, 11:41 AM
"Full Bird Captain" - only reason I can see for using that one is to differentiate between someone whose rank actually is captain and the commanding officer of a vessel, who may be a CDR or LCDR, who would also be called a captain as they are the captain of their ship.

Rusty Jones
03-26-2012, 03:25 PM
"Full Bird Captain" - only reason I can see for using that one is to differentiate between someone whose rank actually is captain and the commanding officer of a vessel, who may be a CDR or LCDR, who would also be called a captain as they are the captain of their ship.

Back when the name of the rank of present day one-star Admirals was "Commodore," were they called "Full Star Commodores" to distinguish themselves from Captains serving in that capacity, such as DESRONs?

If not, I doubt that could be it. I'm sure that there had to have been many more ways that would make more sense than "Full Bird Captain." Even just simply "Bird Captain" would make sense.

spirit_eyes
03-27-2012, 04:51 PM
ever sent anyone looking for a padeye puller?
or bucket of prop wash?
oldie but goodies. great for teaching someone the layout, and meeting folks.

forcedj
03-27-2012, 05:14 PM
"The brow is now open for normal traffic."
This is normally passed after the brow has been secured. What I'm wondering is why they don't say "the brow is now open for traffic." Why do they have to say NORMAL traffic? Can the brow be open for ABNORMAL traffic?

Semantics. Normal, regular, usual, ordinary, customary, common. If the brow is in place it’s open for varying degrees of traffic. All hands, khaki (‘and above’) only, officers only, CO only, etc.



"There are divers working over the side. Do not throw anything over the side..."
Does this mean that when the divers secure, that we CAN throw things over the side?

Mooring lines, water, emergency jettison for things burning, ashes for burial at sea (people do work OTS underway), etc.


I always thought it was interesting how punishment is "awarded" at Captain's Mast.

Dan

SeaLawyer
03-28-2012, 01:53 AM
How about "All Hands." Shouldn't it be rephrased as: "All Enlisted?"

Rusty Jones
03-28-2012, 10:12 AM
How about "All Hands." Shouldn't it be rephrased as: "All Enlisted?"

That's one of the things that have always pissed me off. I remember when I was a Second Class on shore duty, and there was "all hands" PT on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays. E6 and above never showed up.

Now, here's the thing: If it was called "E5 and below" PT; or the official policy for the command was that E5 and below are required to attend, and it's optional for E6 and above; I'd have had absolutely NO gripe, and I wouldn't have thought anything of it. Just stop calling things "all hands" when it's really not.

SailorDave
03-29-2012, 04:28 AM
That's one of the things that have always pissed me off. I remember when I was a Second Class on shore duty, and there was "all hands" PT on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays. E6 and above never showed up.

Now, here's the thing: If it was called "E5 and below" PT; or the official policy for the command was that E5 and below are required to attend, and it's optional for E6 and above; I'd have had absolutely NO gripe, and I wouldn't have thought anything of it. Just stop calling things "all hands" when it's really not.

No, All Hands means everyone. That the E6 and below didn't show is a failure of leadership. The phrase isn't incorrect, it's simply not being enforced.

Greg
03-29-2012, 11:32 AM
.

Originally Posted by Rusty Jones

"There are divers working over the side. Do not throw anything over the side..."
Does this mean that when the divers secure, that we CAN throw things over the side?


Mooring lines, water, emergency jettison for things burning, ashes for burial at sea (people do work OTS underway), etc.



Dan
If there are divers working over the side, as announced over the 1MC, and anything is thrown over the side, into the water, that is an automatic Art. 15...PERIOD.

As far as people working over the side while underway...another NO-GO! At least when I was active duty as a deck seaman and a BM3 between 1976-1984.

CORNELIUSSEON
03-30-2012, 02:09 AM
No, All Hands means everyone. That the E6 and below didn't show is a failure of leadership. The phrase isn't incorrect, it's simply not being enforced.

Actually, the phrase refers to "Deck Hands", which was the original Enlisted Rating which proliferated into all of today's Ratings.

forcedj
03-30-2012, 12:42 PM
http://t3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcR9mQaBR3c-RVEQTdXiRPRXUlNM96X0vtmwyfQmx6Az2tRKQyGS48ncwqA :kiss

Gotta love it when a ground pounder schools swabbies on nautical terminology.

Dan

CORNELIUSSEON
03-30-2012, 01:24 PM
http://t3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcR9mQaBR3c-RVEQTdXiRPRXUlNM96X0vtmwyfQmx6Az2tRKQyGS48ncwqA :kiss

Gotta love it when a ground pounder schools swabbies on nautical terminology.

Dan

It comes from having an older Cousin who spent Four years in the Navy of the 1950s. He then did a career in the NYC Transit Police.

AJBIGJ
03-30-2012, 01:40 PM
It comes from having an older Cousin who spent Four years in the Navy of the 1950s. He then did a career in the NYC Transit Police.

My four year old has been associated with someone in the Navy over the last four years, can't wait to see what he has to say! :biggrin

CORNELIUSSEON
03-30-2012, 02:35 PM
My four year old has been associated with someone in the Navy over the last four years, can't wait to see what he has to say! :biggrin

I was actually 10 Years older than that when Charlie and I talked about his Military service.

AJBIGJ
03-30-2012, 02:49 PM
I was actually 10 Years older than that when Charlie and I talked about his Military service.

Fair enough, I had a similar conversation with my own grandfather about his Army experience when he drafted in 1946 and having lived in the WWII era. Can't say I remember much of the conversation, but I did think it was pretty interesting the draft was still in full effect during that particular year.

Greg
03-30-2012, 07:51 PM
My four year old has been associated with someone in the Navy over the last four years, can't wait to see what he has to say! :biggrin

Uh-oh...stock up on bars of soap. And put a lock on the beer fridge!

CORNELIUSSEON
03-31-2012, 02:13 AM
Fair enough, I had a similar conversation with my own grandfather about his Army experience when he drafted in 1946 and having lived in the WWII era. Can't say I remember much of the conversation, but I did think it was pretty interesting the draft was still in full effect during that particular year.

In my family, there are fairly long stretches of time between Generations. My Father was born in 1897, and served in World War One (but was denied permission to deploy to France because the quota on African Americans was filled), and wasn't drafted for World War Two because he was already 43. My older Brother William did serve in World War Two, and is buried in the American Cemetery in Florence, Italy. He died on February 28, 1945 in the North Appennines Battle, and was 22. Charlie went into the Navy in the late 1950s, and spent most of his post training period on board a ship in the Atlantic. I forget which one, and I've not talked with him in a very long time, and he is now in his 70s. My Cousin Jack served in World War Two and Korea as a Warrant Officer, and finished his time as a Commissioned Officer in the New York Army National Guard, in the same unit I served in.

SENDBILLMONEY
04-01-2012, 08:10 PM
Actually, the phrase refers to "Deck Hands", which was the original Enlisted Rating which proliferated into all of today's Ratings.

Strangely, I don't see that on "Compilation of Enlisted Ratings and Apprenticeships, U.S. Navy, 1775 to 1969." I wonder why that is. http://www.history.navy.mil/faqs/faq78-3.htm

SENDBILLMONEY
04-01-2012, 08:11 PM
Actually, the phrase refers to "Deck Hands", which was the original Enlisted Rating which proliferated into all of today's Ratings.

Strangely, I don't see that on "Compilation of Enlisted Ratings and Apprenticeships, U.S. Navy, 1775 to 1969." I wonder why that is. http://www.history.navy.mil/faqs/faq78-3.htm

Greg
04-01-2012, 09:02 PM
All enlisted ratings evolved from deck hands.

The boatswain's mate is the original "deck" rating; the other deck ratings followed i.e., gunners mate, quartermaster, signalman, ect. In other words, those who worked on the decks of the ship.

In the U.S. Navy, the enlisted wear their rating/rank on the left shoulder/arm. Not sure, but till 1956(?) the boatswain's mates wore their rating/rank on the right side, to make sure that all could see that the boatswain's mates were considered the "right-hand" rating/rank of the Navy!

CORNELIUSSEON
04-03-2012, 08:41 PM
Strangely, I don't see that on "Compilation of Enlisted Ratings and Apprenticeships, U.S. Navy, 1775 to 1969." I wonder why that is. http://www.history.navy.mil/faqs/faq78-3.htm

It has been my experience that you often need to read several historical sources to get a fuller picture of what transpired during a spcific range of time. It is often normal for each source to leave things out, and reading those several sources will probably answer your qeustion. One of the best sources of the beginning history of the US Navy was put out by Teddy Roosevelt. It focused on the period of the War of 1812, when the Navy as we know it was created. There are others, of course. I never consider the absence of a specific fact or subject from a specific source as proof that it doesn't exist, just that the author didn't consider it important to the story he was telling.

SailorDave
04-04-2012, 07:15 AM
Actually, the phrase refers to "Deck Hands", which was the original Enlisted Rating which proliferated into all of today's Ratings.
I wasn't commenting on what the word used to refer to. I'm talking about the phrase as it's currently in use. "All hands" means everyone, not just enlisted. If the word is passed "Assemble All Hands on the flight deck" then everyone goes, regardless of rank.

Cornelius, can you provide a reference for your post ? I'm interested in the obscure origins of other words that we use in the services.

forcedj
04-04-2012, 01:49 PM
In the U.S. Navy, the enlisted wear their rating/rank on the left shoulder/arm. Not sure, but till 1956(?) the boatswain's mates wore their rating/rank on the right side, to make sure that all could see that the boatswain's mates were considered the "right-hand" rating/rank of the Navy!

Greg,
"Right arm rates" switched to left arm a little earlier than 1956. Around WWII, I think. But basically the right arm rates were the non-technical ratings like BM, BT, SM, GM, QM, etc. The left are rates were the technical ratings such as RM, HM, OS, ST, etc.

http://www.history.navy.mil/faqs/faq78-5.htm


Dan

Greg
04-04-2012, 05:13 PM
Greg,
"Right are rates" switched to left arm a little earlier than 1956. Around WWII, I think. But basically the right arm rates were the non-technical ratings like BM, BT, SM, GM, QM, etc. The left are rates were the technical ratings such as RM, HM, OS, ST, etc.

http://www.history.navy.mil/faqs/faq78-5.htm



Dan


Thanks for the website, I'll make note of it and keep it filed. I'm not sure where I picked that up from, Boatswain's Mates rigging and small cargo handling school in NAB Dam Neck, VA. or one of the two grizzled BMCM's I worked for.

I do remember watching some old newsreels and grainy black-n-white footage of WWII and noticing other ratings badges on the right arm.

Mr. Squid
04-04-2012, 06:00 PM
We need to put ratings on both sleeves.

Back on topic, I just found this Navy lingo dictionary over at goatlocker.org. Pretty interesting stuff here, to me anyhow. goatlocker.org/resources/nav/navyslang.pdf (http://goatlocker.org/resources/nav/navyslang.pdf)

Greg
04-04-2012, 07:43 PM
We need to put ratings on both sleeves.

Back on topic, I just found this Navy lingo dictionary over at goatlocker.org. Pretty interesting stuff here, to me anyhow. goatlocker.org/resources/nav/navyslang.pdf (http://goatlocker.org/resources/nav/navyslang.pdf)

Nice find, thanks!

Space: Refers to a room or a compartment onboard ship.
Spandaflage: Overweight personnel squeezing into camo that is too small.
Sparky: Radioman or Electrician's Mate.
Split Tails: Female sailors. Used more often in the early days of surface ship
integration.
Spook: Usually a CT, IS or some kind of intelligence type.
SPU: Staff Pick-Up. Nuke term referring to individuals that finish the training
pipeline and instead of going out to sea like everyone else, stays behind and
teaches in the pipeline. SPUs on a submarine are treated harder than a typical Nub
due to the typical SPUs attitudes and own self delusions.
Spunk: Cool Whip or anything like it.

There's no "splicing-the-mainbrace!"

garhkal
05-06-2012, 08:19 PM
While not specific to the navy, one that has always bugged me.

I am a man of my word, trust me when i say it.

Especially when coming from one of the chain of command.

Greg
05-06-2012, 09:05 PM
While not specific to the navy, one that has always bugged me.

I am a man of my word, trust me when i say it.

Especially when coming from one of the chain of command.

Anytime someone says that to me...a siren goes off in my head.

giggawatt
05-06-2012, 09:48 PM
How about all of them? :bolt

Neutron Whisperer
05-20-2012, 02:02 PM
It bothers me to hear on the 1MC, "All hands not currently on watch, must in Control for clean up."

RobotChicken
08-16-2013, 10:37 AM
Anytime someone says that to me...a siren goes off in my head.

"Hey 'Greg'; shipmate, pass me some 'compass bearing grease' that's besides the 'skyhook' through the porthole willya pleze?

sandsjames
08-16-2013, 03:46 PM
"Hey 'Greg'; shipmate, pass me some 'compass bearing grease' that's besides the 'skyhook' through the porthole willya pleze?

Really hope this wasn't the offending post causing the ban.

Absinthe Anecdote
08-16-2013, 03:51 PM
Really hope this wasn't the offending post causing the ban.

I don't think so; I was up early this morning and saw he had necro posted a bunch of old threads bemoaning the loss of his buddy.

Creaminess
08-16-2013, 04:26 PM
What you have here is a case of the verbal diarrhea that tasks the American language. The Army has been plagued with examples as well.

Mess - which is a word that describes the place for meals and camaraderie lasted for more than 200 years, only to be replaced by several different phrases.

The Closed Mess - both the Officers Closed Mess and the Enlisted Closed mess - were replaced by the Unit Mess, and then by the Dining Facility.

The Open Mess - again the Enlisted and Officers Open Mess - were replaced by the Enlisted Club, the NCO Club, the Officers Club, and - lately - the Community Club.

The term Sick Call hails from the days when a specific Bugle Call was sounded to announce the start of the period for going for ordinary medical care. The phrase stuck as the name for the event, and now has lost the connection with the actual call.

There are many others.

The bolded part above describes every post Corny has ever written.

Pullinteeth
08-16-2013, 05:01 PM
...a shipful of seamen....

forcedj
08-22-2013, 12:46 PM
Is it part of the PRT?

“Stand-down.” Is that the opposite of “sit-up”?

http://www.navytimes.com/article/20130819/CAREERS03/308190011/Fleet-reacts-chief-training-standdown

Dan

Rusty Jones
09-03-2013, 01:39 PM
When not referred to specifically by name, ships are referred to using female pronouns.

Yet we refer to destroyers, frigates, and cruisers (at least the Ticonderoga class) as "small boys."

...shouldn't we refer to them as "small girls?" Or at least refer to these ships using male pronouns? One of them has got to give.

sandsjames
09-03-2013, 01:41 PM
When not referred to specifically by name, ships are referred to using female pronouns.

Yet we refer to destroyers, frigates, and cruisers (at least the Ticonderoga class) as "small boys."

...shouldn't we refer to them as "small girls?" Or at least refer to these ships using male pronouns? One of them has got to give.

Maybe we should let the ships decide what pronouns they want to be referred to as?

Stalwart
09-03-2013, 01:45 PM
Maybe we should let the ships decide what pronouns they want to be referred to as?

Naval tradition:

From the US Navy History site:

It has always been customary to personify certain inanimate objects and attribute to them characteristics peculiar to living creatures. Thus, things without life are often spoken of as having a sex. Some objects are regarded as masculine. The sun, winter, and death are often personified in this way. Others are regarded as feminine, especially those things that are dear to us. The earth as mother Earth is regarded as the common maternal parent of all life. In languages that use gender for common nouns, boats, ships, and other vehicles almost invariably use a feminine form. Likewise, early seafarers spoke of their ships in the feminine gender for the close dependence they had on their ships for life and sustenance.

From the internet:

The truth of the matter is that about 600 years ago, a man by the name of Prince Henry (Henry Henrique) who became known as Prince Henry the Navigator (1394-1460) was a Portuguese royal prince that "financed" many explorers. Prince Henry sent many sailing expeditions down Africa's west coast, but did not go on them himself. Thanks to Prince Henry's money, Portuguese ships sailed to the Madeira Islands, rounded Cape Bojador, sailed to Cape Blanc and around Cap Vert, as well as many other places of discovery.

While not nearly so popular as Columbus, Prince Henry actually financed a far greater amount of ships and while he himself did not sail on any of them, the ships he financed, discovered many more lands then any other sailors and exployers of his time. Magellan, being one of them.

At that time, ships were commonly named after the King or Queens that financed them. Prince Henry's ships however had various names. He however was quoted as saying that all his ships were a "she" because "like a woman, they take much powder and paint to keep them looking good".

sandsjames
09-03-2013, 01:47 PM
Naval tradition:

From the US Navy History site:

It has always been customary to personify certain inanimate objects and attribute to them characteristics peculiar to living creatures. Thus, things without life are often spoken of as having a sex. Some objects are regarded as masculine. The sun, winter, and death are often personified in this way. Others are regarded as feminine, especially those things that are dear to us. The earth as mother Earth is regarded as the common maternal parent of all life. In languages that use gender for common nouns, boats, ships, and other vehicles almost invariably use a feminine form. Likewise, early seafarers spoke of their ships in the feminine gender for the close dependence they had on their ships for life and sustenance.

From the internet:

The truth of the matter is that about 600 years ago, a man by the name of Prince Henry (Henry Henrique) who became known as Prince Henry the Navigator (1394-1460) was a Portuguese royal prince that "financed" many explorers. Prince Henry sent many sailing expeditions down Africa's west coast, but did not go on them himself. Thanks to Prince Henry's money, Portuguese ships sailed to the Madeira Islands, rounded Cape Bojador, sailed to Cape Blanc and around Cap Vert, as well as many other places of discovery.

While not nearly so popular as Columbus, Prince Henry actually financed a far greater amount of ships and while he himself did not sail on any of them, the ships he financed, discovered many more lands then any other sailors and exployers of his time. Magellan, being one of them.

At that time, ships were commonly named after the King or Queens that financed them. Prince Henry's ships however had various names. He however was quoted as saying that all his ships were a "she" because "like a woman, they take much powder and paint to keep them looking good".

Thank you Corneliusseon

Stalwart
09-03-2013, 01:51 PM
Just saying, there is a reason why we call a ship/boat "she".

Vrake
09-03-2013, 01:56 PM
Thank you Corneliusseon

Ouch dude!! LOL

Stalwart
09-03-2013, 02:18 PM
Ouch dude!! LOL

yeah ... it did sting when I read that :)

sandsjames
09-03-2013, 04:58 PM
Glad you liked that. The strict quotation of information from a website had to warrant a mention of him.