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Bunch
08-28-2009, 09:13 PM
Post deleted by member

lrsd01
10-19-2009, 03:54 AM
I was wondering if i could ask you a quick question about joining, im prior service from the army i just recently ETS from the army i have a honorable discharge, my dd214 and all other documents needed to join i was a 11BO in the army my rank was SGT E-5 and im Ranger and ABN qual plus other minor schools i was in for 5 years, my only downfall is that i got out with a RE code 3 cause i was a medical discharge for 2 left knee surgeries which didnt allow me to be a 11B anymore according to regs if you could please get back to me on how many prior service is the USAF taking at this time and is there anything that i can do to help, i know about the medical waiver which i am working on and my knee is actually very good now that i had some time to rest and heal.

Go_Blue
10-27-2009, 06:52 PM
lrsd01 - Are you looking at OTS or going enlisted? If enlisted, you ought to post your own thread regarding your circumstances, not in the OTS thread where no one is ever going to see it.

Back to the OTS discussion (lively as it is!), I will back up what Bunch has to offer, and thank him for making this thread for other OTS hopefuls. I just got selected on the 09OT04 non-rated board, and the competition was extremely stiff. I do not have a technical degree, but because of my academic achievements, community involvement, letters of recommendation, and a fantastic interview, the package was strong enough to make the very demanding cut.

Chemist
10-29-2009, 04:22 AM
I have a BS in Chemistry and had a 2.92 GPA when I graduated. When I was in high school I took the ASVAB for the heck of it and score high enough that I had every recruiter calling me trying to get me to join. I am thinking about applying to OTS but am unsure. I have no prior military experience and just graduated May 09 and have no experience in my field yet. What do you think my chances of getting accepted are?

Go_Blue
10-29-2009, 02:22 PM
I'm sure Bunch will chime in with the correct info, but I believe your degree is a technical one, so that is in your favor. My recuiter says he's always looking for people with technical degrees. You GPA, though, could be much higher. That is a strike against you. GPA technically is no longer a weighted component during the selection process, but it is certainly considered as part of the "whole person concept," and a low GPA can hurt you.

Also, ask the recruiter if chemistry degrees are in the Critical Accession Degree (CAD) program at the moment. As I understand it, those with degrees that qualify for the CAD program can apply any time during the year and are evaluated against a set of standards, not other applicants. No boards to wait around for. Definitely worth checking out.

It's nice that you scored well on the ASVAB, but in order to apply to OTS you'll have to score well on the Air Force Officer Qualifying Test (AFOQT). The ASVAB plays no role whatsoever in the OTS process. If you have volunteering experience, leadership roles in and out of school, and good letters of recommendation from those who know you well, you could put together a solid package. I'm no recruiter though, so this is where I shut up and let the professionals do their thing.

Also, check out AirForceOTS.com. You'll get a lot more help and insight than on this forum.

Bunch
10-30-2009, 04:00 AM
I have a BS in Chemistry and had a 2.92 GPA when I graduated. When I was in high school I took the ASVAB for the heck of it and score high enough that I had every recruiter calling me trying to get me to join. I am thinking about applying to OTS but am unsure. I have no prior military experience and just graduated May 09 and have no experience in my field yet. What do you think my chances of getting accepted are?

GO_BLUE jus gave you some fantastic advice...who better to explain to you the process than someone who just did it?!!

Like Blue said your degree os a technical one but it wont qualify you this time for CAD BUT and this is a big BUT you got to apply because things change in a hearbeat as far as Air Force needs are concerned. A technical degree is a plus, just make sure when you take the AFOQT you ace that test, you got to ace the interview and get some good letter of recomendation that shows leadership, community involvement and if you know, a family member knows or a frieds know someone with rank in the military that can write you a letter of recommendation even better.

Talk to your local recruiter and do your research about the AFOQT, I think you have a good chance if you are determined to make it.

Go_Blue
10-30-2009, 02:19 PM
Thanks Bunch. :)

As someone who just went through it successfully, I just wanted to add some advice to anyone else considering applying to OTS. I don't think I'm allowed to say much about the AFOQT other than it is long, timed, and while it's not all rocket science, it is something people need to take very seriously. Do not go in unprepared by blowing off studying and getting familiar with the material on the test. It depends on what type of test taker you are too. I know some people who were notified two days before they took it, and they scored 90's across the board; others had months to study and still only scored in the 30's (vice-versa, too!). That's why it's so important to know your strengths/weaknesses ahead of time, and plan accordingly.

Here are some links I found helpful during my studying:

http://www.petersons.com/dod/DODHubPage.aspx?sponsor=12894&HubPage=10191
http://www.baseops.net/afoqt/
http://www.proprofs.com/flashcards/search.php?search=afoqt

The Petersons site is particularly helpful, as that contains a full practice test, as well as links to the current edition of the Arco Master the Officer Candidate Tests book. The AFOQT-specific section can be found at: http://airforce.com/pdf/AFOQT_S_Pamphlet_REV.pdf

Once you've studied, take the practice test under timed conditions to see how well you do. I cannot stress enough the importance of being familiar with the allotted time on various sections of this 11-part test. The material itself is not the most difficult, but the real game lies in completing the section in the time allowed.

The officer interview, as Bunch noted, is also crucial. As the Capt I interviewed with explained, they act as the quality control and eyes for the selection board. An applicant can look fantastic on paper, but when it comes to interacting in person, they just don't cut it (in appearance, behavior, communication skills, etc). As much attention as the AFOQT gets, I really think the officer interview can make or break an application. Know yourself, your motivations and desires for joining the Air Force, different leadership styles and which one suits you (and why). That's the applicant's chance to shine (NOT brag...check the attitude at the door) and explain what they have to bring to the Air Force's table. If you make a great impression on the officer conducting your interview, they will go above and beyond to give you the best endorsement possible. Trust me.

Also, be a good applicant. Don't make your recruiter do all the leg work, because it's not their job! I had a fantastic OA recruiter (my EA recruiter, who did all the initial stuff, was great too). We communicated well, and I made sure that I had all the documents, paperwork, etc completed on time or early, and showed up where I needed to be when I needed to be. I did a lot of research on my own, lurked for awhile on the AirForceOTS.com forum (great resource, but has it's share of BS too), and got a jump start on gathering letters of recommendation, security clearance contacts, etc. I had my personal statement finished and reviewed by many people well before I needed to give my recruiter my packet. Everything that was my responsibility to do was DONE, reviewed, and reviewed once more before my recruiter even had to look at it. It minimized the work on his end, and made the process much more efficient. Establish a good working relationship too. I felt like I could call my recruiter anytime, and once the results started getting delayed, I did call him often enough to stay in the loop (but not be a pest). Don't act like you're entitled to anything, because your recruiter (the Air Force in general, actually) owes you nothing.

If anyone has any specific questions, I'd be happy to answer them from the applicant's point of view. I found the process extremely rewarding, even though the waiting at times was killer. Some folks on the AirForceOTS site are putting together an OTS Wiki page (http://myingling.com/random/otswiki/index.php?title=Main_Page) those thinking about applying and wanting to learn more about the process.

Bunch
10-31-2009, 05:29 AM
GO_BLUE thanks for your wonderful contribution to this thread...you bring an outstanding perspective to it... you even teaching myself as I plan to apply for OTS once my recruiting gig is over.

Go_Blue
10-31-2009, 01:40 PM
You're welcome, Bunch! :) Thank you for starting the thread. It'll be a great resource to those on the forum. How much time do you have left with recruiting? Best of luck to you man, I hope you make it (and that your board isn't as brutal as mine)!

I have to really hand it to my recruiter and his entire squadron. He had eight of the 72 civilian selects on that last board. I know my package was good, but I give that group a lot of credit. I have a lot of respect for the work you guys do, especially considering the amount of it and the fact that some applicants are more difficult than others.

Now I just get to enjoy the long wait for my class date, yay!

datboy07
11-02-2009, 07:00 AM
First I would like to thank Go_Blue and Bunch for taking the time out to create and respond to the questions thus far, you have been highly helpful and I do appreciate it.

My question is what scores do have to make on the test (can you tell you tell me the name of the tests I would have to take) in order to go in as an officer? Also can I become a doctor in the Air Force, as in can I still go to medical school and travel the world and help people? My main reason for the interest in the air force is I can help people in the medical way, and not only will it teach me to be more discipline but I know I will come out with more life lessons as in how to survive under pressure and anything else that you all are willing to teach me. I am a junior in college, biology major, with a 3.0. I have participated in many community service functions like: Aids Walk, St Jude Up Till Dawn, Campus Clean up, and volunteer at the local shelter helping little kids just to name a few. I also hold positions on campus like: member of the orientation guide corp. (check in committee), logistics chair for St Jude Up Till Dawn, Chief of Staff and Council of Chartered Organizations Rep. for Campus Activity Board and etc. My family has a lot of military people in it, but I wanted to ask you guys first before I go and ask them anything ridiculous, because proper prior planning prevents piss poor performance just thought I’d add that in there. Thank you for responding.

Go_Blue
11-02-2009, 12:28 PM
Hi datboy,

One area of OTS I'm not familiar with is the healthcare side. I do know the Air Force offers a Health Professionals Scholarship Program (http://www.airforce.com/opportunities/healthcare/education/) (HPSP) that allows for continuing medical education. As you're a college junior and haven't attended medical school yet, I'm not sure how the selection would work. I know medical professionals are evaluated for officer selection through Medical Service Corps Boards rather than the regular rated/non-rated selection boards. You would have to talk to an OTS or Healthcare recruiter in order to get the straight answer there, because unfortunately I don't know the answer. I bet Bunch could give you some great info.

You would have to take the Air Force Officer Qualifying Test (AFOQT). As far as the AFOQT goes, a 50 on any given section of the test is considered average. The score is based on percentiles, not percentage of what you got correct. Meaning, if you scored a 50, that means you scored better than 50% of the people who have taken the test. Some say there is no failing score, but in my experience anything under 20 is a real negative on the score set (I think 10 or below is "failing?"). For non-rated hopefuls like myself, I had to be sure to score high in the Academic Aptitude, Verbal, and Quantitative sections, with less emphasis on the Pilot and Navigator sections as I was not going for a flight career, though I happened to score well in those too. The boards this year have been competitive, and might get more competitive, though it's really difficult to say. Scores in the 80's and 90's are highlights to the package for sure; scores in the 70's and 60's are still good as they're still above "average," and scores below 50 are usually a weak spot. I've seen people get selected with high 90's across the board; and I've seen people with the same stats get non-selected as well, while people with scores in the 40's and 50's get picked up.

It's for that reason that one has to understand that the AFOQT is important, but not the end-all, be-all of the OTS package. Solid AFOQT scores are a definite plus for sure. However, if your package contains strong leadership experience and skills, volunteering experience, solid academic history, etc, and really demonstrates your qualities as a person and a leader, you do stand a chance of selection even if the test scores aren't 99's. OTS applicants love to throw around the "whole person concept" regarding selection, and I believe it's true. Objective items in the package such as the AFOQT offer a standard by which to compare applicants, but the rest of the package can be just as important from a subjective point of view.

It's not ridiculous to be thinking about the AF or asking your family about it. Just do a lot of research, talk to recruiters, and talk to those in the medical field if you can find them. You're off to the right start, good luck! :)

Chemist
11-06-2009, 06:29 AM
Should I apply directly to OTS as a civilian? Would my chances of being accepted increase if I were to enlist in the Air Force, possibly excellling in whatever I do, then apply? I'm just not sure what the best route to take is. I want to be doing something now.

Go_Blue
11-06-2009, 01:15 PM
Whatever the enlisted recruiters say, I am not convinced that enlisting first then applying to OTS increases your chances. I suppose with a low GPA, you might be able to make up for it with strong Enlisted Performance Reports (EPRs), but that's not a guarantee. I know a great enlisted candidate who had phenomenal test scores, EPRs, community involvement, and good character, but he didn't get picked up on this last board (low GPA and moral waivers). Also keep in mind that when they say "you can apply in one year," after enlisting, they mean one year on station at your permanent base. That's after BMT and your tech school. You need time to gain proficiency in whatever AFSC you're in, as well as build some EPRs and gain a rapport with your commanders. Don't expect that one year after shipping, wherever you are, that you'll get to put together an OTS package. As far as I know, that will not happen.

Active Duty applicants follow a different application process than civilians. Because their performance records are reviewed, they are allowed only one letter of recommendation, and have to get their commander's endorsement. From the AD applicants I know, they had to jump through more hoops than civilians in order to even apply. The system tends to weed out the weak applicants before their package is even allowed to be submitted, so one can expect the quality of AD packages submitted to probably be pretty strong. But with my limited knowledge on AD OTS applications, that's just about all I'm comfortable saying.

What you really need to ask yourself is: Would you be happy serving a four year enlistment? Because if OTS doesn't work out, that's what you would be doing. Even with OTS, you would be spending plenty of time enlisted, so please, do it because you want to, not because you think it's the only path to OTS. I know lots of great enlisted folk, and have the utmost respect for them. If you want to go enlisted because you would find it rewarding in and of itself, then by all means go for it. But do not simply assume that going enlisted first is going to get you into OTS. Again, AD applicants have a lot to go through in order to apply, and don't always enjoy an even selection rate with the civilians. I'd quote numerical estimates from my selection board, but it was a little scary, and probably not representative of your average situation.

Like I've told other people: if you want OTS, then apply to OTS. I'm a civilian, and got picked up on my first board. I know other civilians that got picked up on their second or third try. If you are not age critical, then there's nothing saying that you can't keep applying to OTS until you get in. If you get close to the enlistment cut off age (27?) and feel that's an option you want to pursue, then do what you feel is best for you. If you're desperate to serve in any capacity, then enlisting is probably a good decision. Just be aware of the current recruiting climate (very selective due to the number of people trying to get in). And to be fair, the OTS process and wait for civilians is going to be a long one anyway. I'm not looking at shipping until August at the earliest (boo!).

ringjamesa
11-12-2009, 12:06 PM
Hi datboy,

One area of OTS I'm not familiar with is the healthcare side. I do know the Air Force offers a Health Professionals Scholarship Program (http://www.airforce.com/opportunities/healthcare/education/) (HPSP) that allows for continuing medical education. As you're a college junior and haven't attended medical school yet, I'm not sure how the selection would work. I know medical professionals are evaluated for officer selection through Medical Service Corps Boards rather than the regular rated/non-rated selection boards. You would have to talk to an OTS or Healthcare recruiter in order to get the straight answer there, because unfortunately I don't know the answer. I bet Bunch could give you some great info.

You would have to take the Air Force Officer Qualifying Test (AFOQT). As far as the AFOQT goes, a 50 on any given section of the test is considered average. The score is based on percentiles, not percentage of what you got correct. Meaning, if you scored a 50, that means you scored better than 50% of the people who have taken the test. Some say there is no failing score, but in my experience anything under 20 is a real negative on the score set (I think 10 or below is "failing?"). For non-rated hopefuls like myself, I had to be sure to score high in the Academic Aptitude, Verbal, and Quantitative sections, with less emphasis on the Pilot and Navigator sections as I was not going for a flight career, though I happened to score well in those too. The boards this year have been competitive, and might get more competitive, though it's really difficult to say. Scores in the 80's and 90's are highlights to the package for sure; scores in the 70's and 60's are still good as they're still above "average," and scores below 50 are usually a weak spot. I've seen people get selected with high 90's across the board; and I've seen people with the same stats get non-selected as well, while people with scores in the 40's and 50's get picked up.

It's for that reason that one has to understand that the AFOQT is important, but not the end-all, be-all of the OTS package. Solid AFOQT scores are a definite plus for sure. However, if your package contains strong leadership experience and skills, volunteering experience, solid academic history, etc, and really demonstrates your qualities as a person and a leader, you do stand a chance of selection even if the test scores aren't 99's. OTS applicants love to throw around the "whole person concept" regarding selection, and I believe it's true. Objective items in the package such as the AFOQT offer a standard by which to compare applicants, but the rest of the package can be just as important from a subjective point of view.

It's not ridiculous to be thinking about the AF or asking your family about it. Just do a lot of research, talk to recruiters, and talk to those in the medical field if you can find them. You're off to the right start, good luck! :)

Couple things. First off, Medical officers don't take the AFOQT (neither do chaplains or lawyers). Second, they all go to COT which is much shorter than the BOT that everyone else goes to...

Go_Blue
11-12-2009, 03:36 PM
Couple things. First off, Medical officers don't take the AFOQT (neither do chaplains or lawyers). Second, they all go to COT which is much shorter than the BOT that everyone else goes to...

I know about COT (which was never even brought up anyway), but not about the GRE/GMAT instead of AFOQT for Medical Service Corps boards. My bad.

ArmyBrave1
11-12-2009, 04:53 PM
Thank you this has been informative.

Bunch
11-14-2009, 12:44 AM
Should I apply directly to OTS as a civilian? Would my chances of being accepted increase if I were to enlist in the Air Force, possibly excellling in whatever I do, then apply? I'm just not sure what the best route to take is. I want to be doing something now.

If you want to be an Air Force officer then try the OTS route first, but you got to be honest with yourself and see if you are really there or if your package needs some polishing.

If you need more "meat" before submitting your package as far as letter of recommendation, community involvement things of that nature you can go the enlisted route and do it or you can stay as a civilian an accomplishing it.

Basically I tell my applicants that if they need a job and then dont think they have what it takes or dont pass the AFOQT with a least in a 50 in each of the 3 parts, then go enlisted.

Like GO_BLUE also said if your AFOQT scores are not there or your GPA is either then enlisted would be a good option too so you can have more "meat" in your application that would compensate those factors

Bunch
11-14-2009, 12:48 AM
First I would like to thank Go_Blue and Bunch for taking the time out to create and respond to the questions thus far, you have been highly helpful and I do appreciate it.

My question is what scores do have to make on the test (can you tell you tell me the name of the tests I would have to take) in order to go in as an officer? Also can I become a doctor in the Air Force, as in can I still go to medical school and travel the world and help people? My main reason for the interest in the air force is I can help people in the medical way, and not only will it teach me to be more discipline but I know I will come out with more life lessons as in how to survive under pressure and anything else that you all are willing to teach me. I am a junior in college, biology major, with a 3.0. I have participated in many community service functions like: Aids Walk, St Jude Up Till Dawn, Campus Clean up, and volunteer at the local shelter helping little kids just to name a few. I also hold positions on campus like: member of the orientation guide corp. (check in committee), logistics chair for St Jude Up Till Dawn, Chief of Staff and Council of Chartered Organizations Rep. for Campus Activity Board and etc. My family has a lot of military people in it, but I wanted to ask you guys first before I go and ask them anything ridiculous, because proper prior planning prevents piss poor performance just thought I’d add that in there. Thank you for responding.

I must admit that I dont know much about the Health Profession Recruiting becasue that is done by experienced recruiters that have been years in the career field. What I will do is that Im going to talk with our local HP Recruiter here and try to get you as much answer as I can.

kfgaris
11-21-2009, 08:25 PM
If it is possible to recieve a personal email in response to my question I would prefer that. I have a few questions. I really want to become a pilot in the Air Force. I'm about to graduate College with a 3.2 GPA in Buiness Administration. I don't have previous flight hours, but am willing to get them if that is what it takes. I have huge community involvement (I'm the youth group leader at my church). I have perfect eye sight, great health, and have already begun to study for my AFOQT test.

Can you please give me an idea of what my chances are for becoming a pilot in the Air Force? If I don't get a flight guarantee, can I work my way into flight school later upon comletion of OTS? Let me know your thoughts for they are greatly appreciated. Thank you.

Kyle

Go_Blue
11-21-2009, 10:10 PM
Check your PMs! :)

stuck
07-19-2010, 06:07 PM
I've read through numerous threads regarding whether to enlist or try and apply for OTS. I understand it's competitive for OTS and have been discouraged to hear a friend with a technical background with avg GPA, decent AFOQT scores, and good recommendations was turned down. I'm just wondering what my chances are...

I graduated May '09 with a BS in Biology. GPA 2.7 and haven't taken AFOQT yet. I know I can get good recommendations/character references (but might be tough to get from a military source). I am 23 and am currently working at an entry level position at a management company. I stay in shape and stay active as far as physique goes. Compared to my friend i seem less "qualified"...I am just looking for what my career options in the AF or maybe another military branch may offfer...

Any feed back would be helpful.

Pullinteeth
07-20-2010, 03:42 PM
Are you looking to fly? If not, your officer options are simple;

1.
2.

Unless of course you are a Lawyer, Doctor, Nurse, Chaplain, or Civil Engineer... The Army used to be your "best" other option but even they have plenty of officers at this point.

stuck
07-20-2010, 03:49 PM
Are you looking to fly? If not, your officer options are simple;

1.
2.

Unless of course you are a Lawyer, Doctor, Nurse, Chaplain, or Civil Engineer... The Army used to be your "best" other option but even they have plenty of officers at this point.

---------------------------------------------

Flying is definitely a possibility. I have 20/20 vision, 6' - 6' 1, 175 lbs. Not sure if ethnic background is an advantage or not for me, but I'm asian. Fluent in writing and speaking korean. US citizen.

smarg
07-20-2010, 03:58 PM
---------------------------------------------

Flying is definitely a possibility. I have 20/20 vision, 6' - 6' 1, 175 lbs. Not sure if ethnic background is an advantage or not for me, but I'm asian. Fluent in writing and speaking korean. US citizen.

You sound like a good candidate. My advice: get killer AFOQT scores by refreshing your math skills, and buying a pre-AFOQT study guide at a book store. A selection board panel member usually first looks at the scores, and if you wow them, they'll look deeper. I know this.

Good luck.

Pullinteeth
07-20-2010, 04:32 PM
You will want to ace the AFOQT and TBAS. Do you have flight time?

Go_Blue
07-21-2010, 05:38 PM
Spend lots of time studying for the AFOQT, and researching which career fields you're interested in. Your low GPA barely qualifies you for rated boards, as the GPA minimum there is 2.5. If you want to apply for the non-rated board (if it happens), you will have to apply for a GPA waiver, as the minimum for non-rated is 3.0. You could qualify for a waiver by scoring at least a 150 combined on the Academic Aptitude, Verbal, and Quantitative sections on the AFOQT. That being said, though, things are super competitve in today's recruiting environment, and a waiver is probably going to be very difficult to come by.

Scores are nice, yes, but they are not THE thing that will get you selected. You need to be a very well qualified, well rounded applicant. Get the best letters of recommendation you can. They don't have to be from military sources, but they have to be from people who know you well and can attest to your character, work ethic, accomplisments, and potential.

You don't give us much information about you or your interests to go on, so a "what are my chances" scenario is sort of weak. Based on the little info I see, and knowing that non-rated will be a stretch regarding your qualifications, I would suggest going ABM or CSO. If you score off the charts on the AFOQT and TBAS, and have some flight time, then you might put yourself in an ok position to apply for pilot. But I would think your chances for ABM might be best, followed by CSO, depending on the needs of the AF.

LT GUNN
09-25-2010, 05:11 PM
Hello Sir, My name is Terrell Gunn and I am currently looking at what branches I would like to commission into. I am graduating from school in about 3 semesters. I attend SFSU and I currently have a 3.6 GPA Cummulitive in the honors program. I am majoring in Criminal Justice and I would like to know what are my chances of entering into the Air Force with those butter bars. Should i even bother going to the boards or according to what you said am I like applicant snoopy? I am also very much involved in the community. I am in the Civil Air Patrol, various clubs at school, I am also a licensed Baptist Minister. I am currently 19 years old. If I would be someone in your opinion that is not qualified could you give me some advice to become TOP NOTCH! My ultimate goal is to go into the OTS program after completion of college and enjoy a career in the airforce. While im moving up to captain I want to simeoutanously earn my M.Div degree and become an Air Force Chaplain. Your advice is much appreciated, thank you.
-Terrell GUnn

LT GUNN
09-25-2010, 05:11 PM
Hello Sir, My name is Terrell Gunn and I am currently looking at what branches I would like to commission into. I am graduating from school in about 3 semesters. I attend SFSU and I currently have a 3.6 GPA Cummulitive in the honors program. I am majoring in Criminal Justice and I would like to know what are my chances of entering into the Air Force with those butter bars. Should i even bother going to the boards or according to what you said am I like applicant snoopy? I am also very much involved in the community. I am in the Civil Air Patrol, various clubs at school, I am also a licensed Baptist Minister. I am currently 19 years old. If I would be someone in your opinion that is not qualified could you give me some advice to become TOP NOTCH! My ultimate goal is to go into the OTS program after completion of college and enjoy a career in the airforce. While im moving up to captain I want to simeoutanously earn my M.Div degree and become an Air Force Chaplain. Your advice is much appreciated, thank you.
-Terrell GUnn

LT GUNN
09-25-2010, 05:11 PM
Hello Sir, My name is Terrell Gunn and I am currently looking at what branches I would like to commission into. I am graduating from school in about 3 semesters. I attend SFSU and I currently have a 3.6 GPA Cummulitive in the honors program. I am majoring in Criminal Justice and I would like to know what are my chances of entering into the Air Force with those butter bars. Should i even bother going to the boards or according to what you said am I like applicant snoopy? I am also very much involved in the community. I am in the Civil Air Patrol, various clubs at school, I am also a licensed Baptist Minister. I am currently 19 years old. If I would be someone in your opinion that is not qualified could you give me some advice to become TOP NOTCH! My ultimate goal is to go into the OTS program after completion of college and enjoy a career in the airforce. While im moving up to captain I want to simeoutanously earn my M.Div degree and become an Air Force Chaplain. Your advice is much appreciated, thank you.
-Terrell Gunn

SENDBILLMONEY
09-25-2010, 08:32 PM
Some suggestions from a retired Air Force master sergeant and current CAP major.

Using a Civil Air Patrol grade as your username on a forum composed primarily of active/reserve/retired military is probably not the best move. Some will construe it as a "wannabe" attempt at best, and as impersonation at worst.

Since you're 19 and the minimum age to hold the grade of 2nd Lt or 1st Lt in CAP is 21, your lieutenancy is apparently in the cadet grades rather than as a senior member. If that is the case, why aren't you clearly indicating that you are in fact a cadet ("CADET GUNN or "C/LT GUNN") as is done in CAP? I suspect it was a mixture of enthusiasm and not thinking things through. Someone with a more negative outlook might say "this guy wants to be a chaplain and he's not being forthcoming about his status, hmm..." It's unfortunate, but you have to start thinking about appearances.

Active duty service (as a line officer or otherwise) would almost certainly see you deployed and pose other obstacles to obtaining an M.Div and ecclesiastical endorsement on your desired timeline. I suggest that you look at AFI 36-2005, specifically the provisions about the chaplain candidate program. You would complete your bachelor's degree on your own dime, then apply for a commission as 2nd Lt/chaplain candidate while you complete your M.Div.

Some additional friendly advice: Carefully proofread your posts. You're representing yourself, your ministry, CAP and the SFSU honors program and you aspire to be a commissioned officer in the United States Air Force. You don't represent yourself or those programs well when you misspell words (cumulative, simultaneously) and inappropriately capitalize them. It could cause doubt about your potential to achieve the lofty goals you have set. Pay attention to the little things. Give people reasons to help you along rather than to take you out of the running.

You might think I'm being harsh (or something less printable), but that's not the case. I wish you luck. If I didn't, I wouldn't have bothered to write this.

Bill

stuck
12-01-2010, 05:23 PM
I've read through numerous threads regarding whether to enlist or try and apply for OTS. I understand it's competitive for OTS and have been discouraged to hear a friend with a technical background with avg GPA, decent AFOQT scores, and good recommendations was turned down. I'm just wondering what my chances are...

I graduated May '09 with a BS in Biology. GPA 2.7 and haven't taken AFOQT yet. I know I can get good recommendations/character references (but might be tough to get from a military source). I am 23 and am currently working at an entry level position at a management company. I stay in shape and stay active as far as physique goes. Compared to my friend i seem less "qualified"...I am just looking for what my career options in the AF or maybe another military branch may offfer...

Any feed back would be helpful.

UPDATE:
i want to do something with my life, i wanted to find a career...i decided to submit my application package for OTS.

AFOQT
pilot- 79
nav - 83
aa - 79
verb - 48
quant -93

got my physical. went through interview. now scheduled for tbas. Going for RPA pilot, cso, abm slots.

Bunch
01-03-2011, 05:02 PM
Looks like you got some good AFOQT scores.... And I say good not outstanding. Hopefully it works out for you... I know is still hard to qualify and hopefully you will.

stuck
01-03-2011, 05:31 PM
UPDATE:
i want to do something with my life, i wanted to find a career...i decided to submit my application package for OTS.

AFOQT
pilot- 79
nav - 83
aa - 79
verb - 48
quant -93

got my physical. went through interview. now scheduled for tbas. Going for RPA pilot, cso, abm slots.

well i took the tbas and got a pcsm score of 54...w/ no flight time.

we'll see what happens...will update later

iReddit
01-03-2011, 06:46 PM
I’m a AF SNCO and I’ve looked into commission on several occasions. I was fully qualified, had incredible AFOQT numbers, glowing recommendations, but ultimately decided against moving to the “dark side.” This came about when I realized that the only time I even considered the change was during a major career event that left me frustrated and disgruntled. Commissioning wouldn’t be my ticket to greener pastures.

I’ll tell you that the tone of this thread is a little misleading. I taught AF officers for technical training. You don’t have to be a brain child. There are plenty of Air Force officers out there without technical degrees, with low GPAs, et al. Now, the Air Force has a glut of officers, so they’re being more selective. This changes every 6-10 years it seems. If you have time to get additional training, schooling (retake a class for a higher GPA), degrees, go for it. There are plenty of AF articles on the strategic needs of the force. Right now they need linguists, analysts and PTLs. How can you meet their needs.

Bottom line is, this is great advice but don’t get hung up on one thing or the other. The whole person concept is what counts. Find out how you can best fit a strategic need, and how you can improve your package.

Bunch
01-03-2011, 07:46 PM
I’m a AF SNCO and I’ve looked into commission on several occasions. I was fully qualified, had incredible AFOQT numbers, glowing recommendations, but ultimately decided against moving to the “dark side.” This came about when I realized that the only time I even considered the change was during a major career event that left me frustrated and disgruntled. Commissioning wouldn’t be my ticket to greener pastures.

I’ll tell you that the tone of this thread is a little misleading. I taught AF officers for technical training. You don’t have to be a brain child. There are plenty of Air Force officers out there without technical degrees, with low GPAs, et al. Now, the Air Force has a glut of officers, so they’re being more selective. This changes every 6-10 years it seems. If you have time to get additional training, schooling (retake a class for a higher GPA), degrees, go for it. There are plenty of AF articles on the strategic needs of the force. Right now they need linguists, analysts and PTLs. How can you meet their needs.

Bottom line is, this is great advice but don’t get hung up on one thing or the other. The whole person concept is what counts. Find out how you can best fit a strategic need, and how you can improve your package.

I beg your pardon and I'm only speaking for myself when I say that the information/advice I have offered here has been with the best of intentions in order to provide prospective OTS applicants some insight into what it takes to
become an officer for the AF through OTS.

I'm currently serve as a EA (enlisted accessions) and OA (officer accessions) recruiter for the active duty AF. There is nothing wrong in telling applicants about the tough road they are going to face specially in this current recruiting environment.

It is tough and the purpose of this thread is to make them aware of that and give them some advice so they can give themselves the best shot available at making it.

curious
01-21-2011, 09:49 PM
Bunch (and everyone else who has contributed), I think this thread is great! Even if the process is not as hard as it appears to be from reading this thread (although I believe that it probably is as hard as portrayed), it's probably better that people be overly prepared anyways.
I'm currently trying to figure out how to become an officer. I'm thinking either AECP or OTS. I'll have my CCAF in 5 weeks, and I'll have completed at least 4 classes toward the last 2 years of my criminal justice degree. My question is this: I'm taking classes for the AU-ABC program for my degree. If I apply to a college to go the AECP route, can I just stop taking classes with the college for the AU-ABC program? I would also be changing my major if I go the AECP route. I'm getting my degree in criminal justice right now, but if I can get accepted for AECP I'd have to change my major to something that the AECP program offers a scholarship for. If I do not get accepted for AECP, I'll finish my degree in criminal justice and try for OTS. Also, does my major have any correlation to the career field I can get into as an officer, or that strictly based on the test scores?
Thanks!

Measure Man
01-21-2011, 10:36 PM
I'm open to questions if anyone has any...

Great thread Bunch. Thanks a...uhm....bunch.

Anyway...was wondering what you know about NON-scholarship ROTC.

Say my daughter applies to a regular ol' college the old fashioned way, no scholarship or anything (or someone who gets out and may be using the GI Bill?). Can she just join ROTC as a non-scholarship student just like signing up for any other class and be automatically granted a commission upon graduation??

Is it competitive to get into ROTC as a non-scholarship student or is it as easy as signing up for any other class once she is accepted to her university?

Seems to me, for someone who just wants to be an officer...this is sort of the easiest way of doing it, or am I missing something?

Bunch
01-22-2011, 03:37 PM
Bunch (and everyone else who has contributed), I think this thread is great! Even if the process is not as hard as it appears to be from reading this thread (although I believe that it probably is as hard as portrayed), it's probably better that people be overly prepared anyways.
I'm currently trying to figure out how to become an officer. I'm thinking either AECP or OTS. I'll have my CCAF in 5 weeks, and I'll have completed at least 4 classes toward the last 2 years of my criminal justice degree. My question is this: I'm taking classes for the AU-ABC program for my degree. If I apply to a college to go the AECP route, can I just stop taking classes with the college for the AU-ABC program? I would also be changing my major if I go the AECP route. I'm getting my degree in criminal justice right now, but if I can get accepted for AECP I'd have to change my major to something that the AECP program offers a scholarship for. If I do not get accepted for AECP, I'll finish my degree in criminal justice and try for OTS. Also, does my major have any correlation to the career field I can get into as an officer, or that strictly based on the test scores?
Thanks!

Since you are in active duty right now my best advice to you would be to look into one our commissioning programs, SOAR, AECP etc... The reason why is that your commission would be guaranteed as long as you are meeting the requirements and these programs would have you sometimes keep your pay and rank while you are in college, meaning you still on active duty but your job is go to college. You will still keep all benefits and even test for promotion PDG only which is great.

As for your question about Criminal Justice degree, you can become a Security Forces officer or any other job that the AF would think that your bachelors could fit in.

But like I said at the beginning, commissioning programs besides OTS would be the best route for you.

Bunch
01-22-2011, 03:43 PM
Great thread Bunch. Thanks a...uhm....bunch.

Anyway...was wondering what you know about NON-scholarship ROTC.

Say my daughter applies to a regular ol' college the old fashioned way, no scholarship or anything (or someone who gets out and may be using the GI Bill?). Can she just join ROTC as a non-scholarship student just like signing up for any other class and be automatically granted a commission upon graduation??

Is it competitive to get into ROTC as a non-scholarship student or is it as easy as signing up for any other class once she is accepted to her university?

Seems to me, for someone who just wants to be an officer...this is sort of the easiest way of doing it, or am I missing something?

MM,

I in your case I have to warn you that I don't recruit for ROTC, if you want to factual information about their program please contact the local AFROTC detachment at the college your daughter is attending so she can get an orientation about their program.

One word of advice will be to tell you that if she is interested in joining the AF as a officer ROTC would be the route to go, because qualifying through OTS as you might have read here is the hardest way right now.

Good luck!

Kicker
06-22-2012, 11:24 PM
Good Morning All,

I see this thread is a bit older so I hope it still gets eyes on it. I was looking for some pointers on improving an existing OTS package and had some specific questions. First I suppose a little background is in order. I'm a 31 year old SSgt with 8 years of service who has a BA in History (acquired before I joined the AF in 2004) with a lackluster GPA of 2.34. The OTS pipeline for non-technical degrees had virtually dried up by that point so I decided to enlist and attack the issue from this side of the fence. I applied in 2009 and was denied. When I asked my commissioning representative (who was very helpful and who I trust) where she thought my package needed improvement she mentioned the commander's interview section on the form 56. My AMXS/CC wrote some swell things about me, but didn't come close to filing the area and didn't use bullet format (per the instructions on the form). I was initially convinced that my mediocre AFOQT scores were the culprit (P-64, N-65, AA-68, V-78, Q-53) but she suggested against taking it a second time because in her experience folks concentrate too much on their weak areas while sacrificing points in their solid areas. She instead suggested getting a stronger commander recommendation, to which I concur.

Since then, I had a golden opportunity to put a great package together with a solid CC recommendation, as I worked as my new AMXS/CC's executive NCOIC, who also sat on ROTC boards for a time. He was very enthusiastic about putting together the best product we could for an OTS board. Unfortunately, my limiting situation (age and already having a BA) only allowed me to apply for the 1 to 2 non-rated OTS board that were offered every year, which in turn lead to my target board getting cancelled. I've since PCS'd, but my old commander is still supportive in this venture and has offered to talk to my new commander if necessary.

My present situation revolves around getting to know my new boss and shooting for his support. To my surprise, he was very supportive in my intention to apply a second time after only being in the squadron a few months. So here are my questions:

- My current commander wishes to pursue my letter of recommendation from our Group CC. I've been told by past commissioning advisors that boards want a LOR from someone directly in the individual's chain of command with working knowledge of that individual. My Group CC doesn't have working knowledge on me, but is an O-6......should I be concerned about the working knowledge issue?

- Going back to my AFOQT scores.....they were below the average of folks selected from the board I applied for, but were slightly higher than those not selected.....I'm not the best test taker in the world and I'm not entirely convinced that I would be able to raise them significantly without risking dropping other areas. Also, since I am not eligible for a rated board, should I even focus on Pilot and Nav if I do retest?

I appreciate any insight into the matter.

Pullinteeth
06-29-2012, 12:25 PM
Pilot and Nav scores are completely irrelevant if you are not going for a rated slot so I wouldn't WORRY about them but I wouldn't just blow 'em off either. You want to have DECENT scores across the board-may not be relevant but if they see a single digit score-even pilot/nav...well what would YOU think about it if YOU were on the board. Believe it or not, they have done the research and it is actually you Quantative score that is the best predictor of successful completion of OTS (I think the cut line is 66 or 68). Get the best letters you can. Someone that KNOWS you is ALWAYS a better reference than someone that doesn't. For example, recent board, applicant had a letter from his neighbor and another had one from a retired O-9. The one from the O-9 started out with something like...I barely know applicant X but I know of him.... That letter was virtually worthless. No matter how impressive the signature block, they actually do care about the content. Also, make sure the damn things are signed.

Kicker
06-29-2012, 08:41 PM
Thanks Teeth. I had a hunch that the working knowledge aspect would carry more weight than rank. I just have to tactfully let my commander know of that aspect. I've also decided to take the AFOQT again, I don't think I really studied Pilot and Nav all that much the first time and still scored mid 60's. I've got to bring the quantative up while maintaining my AA and verbal. Thanks again for the insight.

smith7173
08-08-2012, 01:43 AM
HELP! i just got my afoqt scores with a 12 on quantitative and 15 on verbal, i am applying for soar, poc-erp and ascp. i have a 3.0 gap. what are my chances?

Bunch
08-08-2012, 02:38 AM
HELP! i just got my afoqt scores with a 12 on quantitative and 15 on verbal, i am applying for soar, poc-erp and ascp. i have a 3.0 gap. what are my chances?

Realistically your chances are slim to none. Although you have the minimum scores on those 2 portions the average scores of those selected are in the 60's. You might want to retake the test again.

Bunch
08-15-2012, 12:21 AM
Just a quick message for lurkers: If you sign up and automatically send me a PM I will be able to see your PM but wont be able to reply. Apparently it has to do with how many post you have so people can respond to your PM's so if you are a new member please post your question here if not I won't be able to respond.

jetzabel
02-26-2013, 01:36 PM
Hi...I'm new to the boards here but I have been lurking for a while. The purpose of this thread is that I see a lot of people either curious, with questions or really wanting to become an officer in the Air Force. I also see many people giving information on it that I could catagorize as solid, good, incomplete and bad information.

As far as my background, I'm a EA and OTS recruiter and been dealing with applicants that come to my office basically with the same set of questions that I see on this and other boards. So I will write this thread to give at least an insight on what we look at as far as recruiting people for OTS.

To apply:
-Got to be a US citizen
-Must have a bachelors degree in something by an accredited institution.
-Pass a medical evaluations at MEPS
-Pass the Air Force Officer Qualifying Test (minimum scores depend for what OTS program appplicant is applying)
-Got to be 35 not older at the time comission is granted (except for special programs like doctors, RN'S)

Thats is just to apply. Many people are under the impression though that because they have a bachelors that they automatically are going to come is as officer. That is something that as recruiter I find very hard to do for an applicant unless the applicant has a degree in something that we really, really need. Example of that would be electrical engineer, enviromental engineer or computer engineer.

As many of you might know the Air Force grants their majority of their officer slots using two programs:
1. Air Force Academy:https://admissions.usafa.edu/secure/Online/Eligibility.htm
2. ROTC:http://www.afrotc.com/scholarships/application/apply/

Those are your best two options if you decide to become an officer. Getting to USAFA is a hard process and you got to be top notch, getting to the ROTC is not that hard but you still got to be top notch while in the program and pass the AFOQT.

So what it takes to becomes an Air Force officer from the outside looking in and didn't went to the USAFA or didn't join ROTC when in college? Like I said earlier you got to have a degree that is in high demand. In the OTS process we divide our process by board and there are three:
1. Rated: for Pilots, Navigators, Air Battle Managers
2. Technical:http://airforce.com/opportunities/officer/careers/technical/
3.Non technical: http://airforce.com/opportunities/officer/careers/nontechnical/

Those boards are conducted according to the needs of the Air Force that are determined by Air Staff, the needs of yesterday are not particularly the needs of today nor they will be the needs of the future, so when trying to maximize your chances of coming into the Air Force as an Officer from the outside looking in you need to ask a recruiter for what the AIr Force is looking for. For some Technical degrees the board might be waived and they would evaluate applications as they arrive.

What are these boards and how do I get selected?

These boards are manned by Officers and they would grade individually each application using a point scale. If the point of your application meets the cut off then you are selected if not then you might resubmit you application, there is no max amount times for submitting an application but there is the age limit.

What do they look in the application?

The whole person concept, meaning GPA, AFOQT scores, Letter of Recomendations, communnity involvement, your participation in groups activities like sports or college organizations.

How long the process could take?

From 4 to 12 months depending again on the needs of the Air Force, OTS slots available and other factors.

I have seen this comment on this board and others a lot:
"You have a bachelors dont let your recruiter tell you to go enlisted, you are supposed to be coming as an officer, if your recruiter tell you otherwise he is lying"

Recruiters have a duty to qualify applicant for the highest program that they qualify, meaning a person with a bachelors degree we have to qualify them first for OTS and then enlisted. But we also have to give applicants a dose of reality, that reality been that not because you have a bachelors degree we automatically going to roll out the red carpet and put butter bars on your shoulder, it is just not that easy and I'm going to explain you why with this scenario:

Applicant Snoopy just got into my office, he said he just read on the internet and some friends that he has in the Air Force that because he has a Bachelors Degree in Accounting he is qualified to become an officer and to please not even mention to him enlisted or his walking out the office. Upon prequalification Applicant Snoopy informs the Recruiter that he graduated with a outstanding 2.68 GPA, did not volunteer for anything, didnt participate in anything, dont know nobody that can write him at least 5 letter of recommendations.

Applicant Snoopy takes the EST and scores a 43. The recruiter is trying to explain to Aplicant Snoopy that he is not ready to take the AFOQT, that he should study a bit more because is a test you can only take twice in a lifetime, but Applicant Snoopy since he read on the internet and also his friends told him that he already qualified to be an officer he decides to take the test tomorrow thinking the test is just a formality.

Two weeks later Recruiter calls Applicant Snoopy and inform him that he score 16 in the verbal portion and 12 in the Quantitative portion of the AFOQT, (meaning minimally qualified).

The Recruiter ended with an applicant in a Non Technical carrer field (low demand), who has a minimum chance of being selected and although he might qualify for enlisted, he wont even consider the possibility because he thinks the recruiter is lying.

Bottom line if you need to be top notch the get to USAFA, to complete ROTC, you need to be more than TOP NOTCH if you are trying to become an Air Force Officer from the outside looking in(or have one of those technical degrees we looking for). And that could be resolve by taking some years as enlisted and then try to make the switch from within.

I'm open to questions if anyone has any...

Hi, I saw that this was posted a while ago and my husband wants to join the Officers program. I'm currently in the AF DEP and my husband tried to join as an enlisted as well but since we have a 2 years old son, we needed a dependency waiver and the Air Force is not approving those for the enlisted program. My flight chief suggested to join as an officer. My husband is 27, has a Bacherlors degree in Business administration with a concentration in Accounting. His GPA 3.02. He works for a retail company and has been store manager for 4 years and before that he was assistant manager for 5 years. He can get very good recommendation letters but we don't know if that is enough. He haven't taken the AFOQT yet. He took the ASVAB and scored 88. When he was trying for the enlisted program he was very interested in a linguistic job and still is(i took the dlab and passed it and i know its probably a 50/50 chance for people to pass but im very confident that he can do it)What are his chances or if someone can give us some advice to improve them??? Thank you In advance.

Michaelb
06-03-2013, 11:21 PM
I have a degree in landscape architecture and I want to know how the Air Force decide if that degree is worth anything. I want to get into OTS but I want to know how valuable my degree is to the Air Force. My degree deals with the health , safety and wellness of people.

RobotChicken
06-04-2013, 12:10 AM
I have a degree in landscape architecture and I want to know how the Air Force decide if that degree is worth anything. I want to get into OTS but I want to know how valuable my degree is to the Air Force. My degree deals with the health , safety and wellness of people.

:spy Seems to me you would fit right in to 'today's AF'!

Michaelb
06-04-2013, 02:35 PM
How do you know. Im worried they really don't understand what we do and think i just make things look pretty with plants and that's not true.

RobotChicken
06-04-2013, 05:19 PM
:spy For one thing,show them a design for a PT running track that is always going 'Downhill' with a ever constant 'tailwind',it will be a 'lifesaver'!

saldana50587
07-08-2013, 10:45 PM
Hi, here's my situation:

1- I have a BS in Electrical Engineering with concentration in telecommunications & electronics engineering from an ABET Accredited College with a GPA of 3.19.
2- I speak Spanish & English
3- I am prior service, I have served in the US ARMY Reserve & ROTC
4- I can provide multiple recommendation letters from college professors and from the leadership of multiple non-profits organizations.
5- I have been a mathematics tutor twice and i have field experience as a telecommunication technician.

What are my chances to become a commissioned Officer? Do I need to take the AFOQT Exam? If so, What else do i need?
-Thank You

Pullinteeth
07-10-2013, 07:16 PM
Hi, here's my situation:

1- I have a BS in Electrical Engineering with concentration in telecommunications & electronics engineering from an ABET Accredited College with a GPA of 3.19.
2- I speak Spanish & English
3- I am prior service, I have served in the US ARMY Reserve & ROTC
4- I can provide multiple recommendation letters from college professors and from the leadership of multiple non-profits organizations.
5- I have been a mathematics tutor twice and i have field experience as a telecommunication technician.

What are my chances to become a commissioned Officer? Do I need to take the AFOQT Exam? If so, What else do i need?
-Thank You

How old are you? Yes you will have to take the AFOQT.

diaz28
07-18-2013, 05:23 PM
Blatantly ripping off saldana's post (its well set up).

1- I have a BS in Systems Engineering with concentration in mechanical engineering and a Masters in Applied Science.
2- Masters project was designing a real time high accuracy sound based location sensor system (very electrical engineering)
3- My wife is a SSGT
4- I can provide multiple recommendation letters from college professors (one who is a previous NSF higher up)
5- 91-76-99-98-96 AFOQT scores

What are my chances to become a commissioned Officer? Specifically I was wanting to become a 62E1E Developmental Engineer- Electrical/Electronic Engineer.

I don't have a degree in Electrical engineering specifically, but I have quite a bit of electrical background and do have a masters and the abet engineering degree.

Thanks

diaz28
07-19-2013, 03:09 AM
Hi, here's my situation: (copied from saldana)

1- I have a BS in Systems Engineering with concentration in mechanical engineering (GPA 3.1) and a masters in Applied Science (GPA 3.5).
2- Masters project was to build a real time sound based high accuracy location sensor system (so I have a fair bit of electrical experience)
3- 28 yrs old
4- I can provide multiple recommendation letters from college professors (one who was a higher up in the NSF).
5- AFOQT was 91-76-99-98-96

I was specifically wanting to know about the 62E1E Developmental Engineer Electrical/Electronics positions- do they require a straight up EE degree?
I have a fair amount of electrical experience, and EE are the only 62E the AF wants atm. How good are my chances?
Thanks

Pullinteeth
07-19-2013, 03:10 PM
Hi, here's my situation: (copied from saldana)

1- I have a BS in Systems Engineering with concentration in mechanical engineering (GPA 3.1) and a masters in Applied Science (GPA 3.5).
2- Masters project was to build a real time sound based high accuracy location sensor system (so I have a fair bit of electrical experience)
3- 28 yrs old
4- I can provide multiple recommendation letters from college professors (one who was a higher up in the NSF).
5- AFOQT was 91-76-99-98-96

I was specifically wanting to know about the 62E1E Developmental Engineer Electrical/Electronics positions- do they require a straight up EE degree?
I have a fair amount of electrical experience, and EE are the only 62E the AF wants atm. How good are my chances?
Thanks

3.2. Education. The following education is mandatory for entry into the AFSC indicated: (Engineering degrees must be in a school that has at least one program accredited by a nationally recognized body in engineering. Currently, the national accrediting body is the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology.)
3.2.2. 62E1X. Undergraduate engineering degree in the specialization identified by the suffix except shredouts F, and G.
E .................................................. ................. Electrical/Electronic

alhaze56
08-06-2013, 01:23 AM
Hey everyone im looking for some info on my chances of getting into the Air Force as an officer. I know i can get some fantastic letters of recommendations from close friends and family that were in the service. im mostly worried about the interview and the test. Consider me a child when it comes to how the military works but i know its something that will make me become the best possible individual i can become.

background info:
-Graduating in december with BS in Biology and a minor in Chemistry
-3.0 GPA
-Associates Degree in Science
-Certificate in Health Studies
-EMT Certification
-Volunteer Fireman for 8 years
-Took Practice ASVAB - 90 (3 years ago- before BS)
-3 years of college rugby
-started a fraternity
-served as a officer to Fire Dept and Fraternity

Im looking toward possibly doing PA school, but im not sure what i really want to do just know that what ever i do i will do really well i just want to be in a position where im happy bc the happier i am the better i work

alhaze56
08-06-2013, 01:25 AM
Hey everyone im looking for some info on my chances of getting into the Air Force as an officer. I know i can get some fantastic letters of recommendations from close friends and family that were in the service. im mostly worried about the interview and the test. Consider me a child when it comes to how the military works but i know its something that will make me become the best possible individual i can become.

background info:
-Graduating in december with BS in Biology and a minor in Chemistry
-3.0 GPA
-Associates Degree in Science
-Certificate in Health Studies
-EMT Certification
-Volunteer Fireman for 8 years
-Took Practice ASVAB - 90 (3 years ago- before BS)
-3 years of college rugby
-started a fraternity
-served as a officer to Fire Dept and Fraternity

Im looking toward possibly doing PA school, but im not sure what i really want to do just know that what ever i do i will do really well i just want to be in a position where im happy bc the happier i am the better i work

ohh im 24 if that changes anything

Bunch
08-06-2013, 01:49 AM
ohh im 24 if that changes anything

You GPA is kind of low and it will place you at a disadvantage unless you do really well on the AFOQT. It seems to me that you are somewhat incline to pursue a health professions background. If that's the case you might want to think to apply to medical or nursing school. If you apply to med school you can get a scholarship that will give you a free ride to college in exchange for year to year commitment. If you decide nursing there is no scholarship for BSN degree but there is loan repayment.

The problem with PA is that is one of those specialties which the AF might have slots available one year and not on the next. For example the past few years we were hiring a lot of PA's and giving lots of scholarships but for this year and next there won't be a requirement. Nursing and MD's/DO's are always open for slots.

RobotChicken
08-06-2013, 01:56 AM
"There is always firefighting/rescue crews on the flightline as Enlisted."

viitwiinfoto
08-08-2013, 11:12 PM
This thread has been very helpful as I am currently trying to become an Air Force Officer, but it seem as though I will have a lot of work cut out for me. I am 23 years old and recently graduated with a 2.8gpa in Bachelors of Arts in History. I have not taken the AFOQT yet, but I'm sure if I prepare myself I can do well to make up for my low gpa. I have been active during my college career with positions of Webmaster in International Students Association Counsel and various international organizations. I also participate in sports such as intramural basketball and flag football if that helps for anything to show active lifestyle and teamwork. How are my chances of obtaining a career with the Air Force in a non-technical field?

sknewberries
08-12-2013, 06:49 PM
I am already about halfway through the application process for the selection board. I am a civilian, I am 26 years old and have a BS in Business Administration and an AA in Business and Management. My GPA is 3.76 and my AFOQT scores are as follows:
Pilot: 68
Navigator: 69
Academic Aptitude: 92
Verbal: 94
Quantitative: 81

I have more recommendation letters than necessary so my recruiter can help me pick out the 5 strongest. I have obtained letters from: An Army recruiter who has known me since I was 13 (vouching for my ability to be an officer in the armed forces), two AF TSgts who know me personally, a prior AF SSgt who knows me personally (all of whom can vouch for my ability to adapt to the military environment and lead others), my family's lawyer who has known me since I was a child- he is going to touch on volunteer work, church and community involvement and overall moral character, and two letters from prior supervisors who discussed my involvement in those positions and the leadership qualities I expressed.

Overall I think my chances are looking pretty great. However, my deadline is Sept 22 and my recruiter has next to ZERO contact with me. He is in Washington and I am in Alaska (there are no AF recruiters up here) so everything is done by email. I have completed all necessary documents and sent them in, but he has not told me when to sign and date all the documents, and has not given me a date for my Officer interview. I try not to press on him for information, but as we have about a month left, is it safe to be a bit more assertive with it? Anything else I can do to raise my chances of selection?

jb123777
08-14-2013, 05:09 AM
I know the needs of the Air Force change all the time but, generally speaking, how much do they need people with a bachelors degree in Computer Science? I'm also minoring in Information Security. I hear that Computer Engineering is in high demand and Computer Science is related yet different.

Unfortunately my school does not offer ROTC and I am already almost done with my second year so that may not be an option. I want to do everything I can to get a good chance of joining OTS. It would be great to join the Air Force as a developmental engineer after graduating. Thanks for any information you can provide.

Bunch
08-14-2013, 04:30 PM
I am already about halfway through the application process for the selection board. I am a civilian, I am 26 years old and have a BS in Business Administration and an AA in Business and Management. My GPA is 3.76 and my AFOQT scores are as follows:
Pilot: 68
Navigator: 69
Academic Aptitude: 92
Verbal: 94
Quantitative: 81

I have more recommendation letters than necessary so my recruiter can help me pick out the 5 strongest. I have obtained letters from: An Army recruiter who has known me since I was 13 (vouching for my ability to be an officer in the armed forces), two AF TSgts who know me personally, a prior AF SSgt who knows me personally (all of whom can vouch for my ability to adapt to the military environment and lead others), my family's lawyer who has known me since I was a child- he is going to touch on volunteer work, church and community involvement and overall moral character, and two letters from prior supervisors who discussed my involvement in those positions and the leadership qualities I expressed.

Overall I think my chances are looking pretty great. However, my deadline is Sept 22 and my recruiter has next to ZERO contact with me. He is in Washington and I am in Alaska (there are no AF recruiters up here) so everything is done by email. I have completed all necessary documents and sent them in, but he has not told me when to sign and date all the documents, and has not given me a date for my Officer interview. I try not to press on him for information, but as we have about a month left, is it safe to be a bit more assertive with it? Anything else I can do to raise my chances of selection?

One thing you have to remember is that this is your process. You need to be proactive and make sure that the recruiter is paying attention to your application. The main key in this process is communication, especially in a situation like yours.

Your AFOQT are at the top tier and so is your GPA. If you need to write an essay make sure you ask your recruiter for feedback about how to word it.

As far as your chances... I dont do OTS but it's becoming very competitive in all programs. So good luck!!

Bunch
08-14-2013, 04:36 PM
I know the needs of the Air Force change all the time but, generally speaking, how much do they need people with a bachelors degree in Computer Science? I'm also minoring in Information Security. I hear that Computer Engineering is in high demand and Computer Science is related yet different.

Unfortunately my school does not offer ROTC and I am already almost done with my second year so that may not be an option. I want to do everything I can to get a good chance of joining OTS. It would be great to join the Air Force as a developmental engineer after graduating. Thanks for any information you can provide.

If I was you I switch to Computer Eng, in a heart beat. Specialties from Cyber Command will be growing at a fast pace and they are expected to add many more personnel to their ranks. You dont need to have a AFROTC program to enroll in the program, you just need to find the nearest AFROTC and call them and inquire about joining their program as a "off campus" student.

Good luck!!

stripes
08-14-2013, 09:06 PM
I'm interested in applying to be an officer, but after reading this thread and doing some other research, I feel very discouraged.

I have a B.A. in Asian Cultures & Languages with a GPA of 3.1. I have little to no community involvement during and after university due to the fact that I worked a lot. In high school, I volunteered for over 800 hours and held several leadership roles in school and volunteer organizations, but I don't think it would be applicable anymore. I know I can work on this if needed.

One major concern that I can't control is my eyesight. Last time I had it checked (a few years ago), it was -9.5. Does this automatically disqualify me?

Bunch
08-15-2013, 04:34 AM
I'm interested in applying to be an officer, but after reading this thread and doing some other research, I feel very discouraged.

I have a B.A. in Asian Cultures & Languages with a GPA of 3.1. I have little to no community involvement during and after university due to the fact that I worked a lot. In high school, I volunteered for over 800 hours and held several leadership roles in school and volunteer organizations, but I don't think it would be applicable anymore. I know I can work on this if needed.

One major concern that I can't control is my eyesight. Last time I had it checked (a few years ago), it was -9.5. Does this automatically disqualify me?

As far as the AF goes it will be tough for you. Mainly because of your degree and GPA, unless you are fluent in Chinese-Mandarin or Korean and that could give you a shot not only in the DoD but any three letter fed agency. You can always apply to the OTS program and you can also apply to the enlisted program at the same time.

When it comes to medical I always leave that to the MEPS and the AF SG office since they are the ones who have the most up to date information regarding medical conditions that would DQ you from military service.

Good luck!!

stripes
08-15-2013, 05:29 AM
As far as the AF goes it will be tough for you. Mainly because of your degree and GPA, unless you are fluent in Chinese-Mandarin or Korean and that could give you a shot not only in the DoD but any three letter fed agency. You can always apply to the OTS program and you can also apply to the enlisted program at the same time.

When it comes to medical I always leave that to the MEPS and the AF SG office since they are the ones who have the most up to date information regarding medical conditions that would DQ you from military service.

Good luck!!

Thank you for the reply!

My concentration was in Mandarin Chinese. I don't think I am fluent by military standards though.

I read on the AF website that the max retraction is -8.0. However, I've been reading on here and another forum that people with vision worse than -8.0 DID receive waivers, but they were closer to -8.0 than I am.

Pullinteeth
08-16-2013, 07:59 PM
To the title of the thread....three simple (yet expensive) words... "LEARN TO FLY"

sharkhunter
08-18-2013, 11:09 PM
Thank you for the reply!

My concentration was in Mandarin Chinese. I don't think I am fluent by military standards though.

I read on the AF website that the max retraction is -8.0. However, I've been reading on here and another forum that people with vision worse than -8.0 DID receive waivers, but they were closer to -8.0 than I am.

Weight and image is a huge issue in with AF Officers.
I've tried for four years to reduce my BMI to meet the officer standards, but I just couldn't do it. AF Officers (apparently) are require to be a BMI of 30 or less...at the start of my OTS application four years ago, I was at a BMI of 35, and the last time I tried I was mesaured at 30.3 and that DQ'd me automatically (and its not waviable).
Good luck on your adventure though and if you can't make it in the AF, don't let it discourage you. At the very least you tried, many people never try and live with the "What If" for the rest of their life. One thing though, if the AF won't take you, the Army will surely take you.

spqrking
08-20-2013, 02:19 PM
HeLlo all I am a current college student looking to become an Air Force officer (surprising I know) I was ineligible for ROTC because my wife is an enlisted member here at Shaw and I have a child. So as another option I joined Civil Air Patrol as a senior member to bolster my potential package and do some good in the community. I understand that having a child and an active duty spouse disqualifies me from active duty service but coincidentally months after I graduate her enlistment would be up (if she would like it to be.) Now my questions are as followed if she wishes to get out can I start the process of commissioning before she is officially out of the military? We would basically trade places but with a family you can see how this would be a risk and as a father I dont wish to put my family in a bad situation. I have wished to join the military for some time but between moving, school, and my son I have decided to go this route. Any suggestions or information would be great I know I can accomplish this goal but its always good to have peace of mind and information.

jjdowney
08-22-2013, 09:06 PM
HeLlo all I am a current college student looking to become an Air Force officer (surprising I know) I was ineligible for ROTC because my wife is an enlisted member here at Shaw and I have a child. So as another option I joined Civil Air Patrol as a senior member to bolster my potential package and do some good in the community. I understand that having a child and an active duty spouse disqualifies me from active duty service but coincidentally months after I graduate her enlistment would be up (if she would like it to be.) Now my questions are as followed if she wishes to get out can I start the process of commissioning before she is officially out of the military? We would basically trade places but with a family you can see how this would be a risk and as a father I dont wish to put my family in a bad situation. I have wished to join the military for some time but between moving, school, and my son I have decided to go this route. Any suggestions or information would be great I know I can accomplish this goal but its always good to have peace of mind and information.

Having an active duty spouse does not disqualify you from active duty or going to OTS. I went to OTS a couple years ago and there were quite a few people with active duty enlisted spouses. An officer and enlisted person are not allowed to date, but if they are married before one of them joins, it is a different story. Having a child doesn't matter either, I have 3 kids, one was born while I was at OTS. There are plenty of joint military families, granted there aren't as many with an officer and an enlisted and it limits the potential bases you can be stationed together, but it can work.

Class5Kayaker
08-22-2013, 09:22 PM
Having an active duty spouse does not disqualify you from active duty or going to OTS. I went to OTS a couple years ago and there were quite a few people with active duty enlisted spouses. An officer and enlisted person are not allowed to date, but if they are married before one of them joins, it is a different story. Having a child doesn't matter either, I have 3 kids, one was born while I was at OTS. There are plenty of joint military families, granted there aren't as many with an officer and an enlisted and it limits the potential bases you can be stationed together, but it can work.

Ditto on jjdowney's comments. I was dual-mil enlisted with three kids and it wasn't an issue for applying to OTS, but I think that only applied to dual military. Either way it doesn't matter now because the AF just recently changed it's rules on this and even ROTC folks can have kids now. Check out this article on it:

http://www.airforcetimes.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2013307310032

Bunch
08-23-2013, 01:41 AM
I'm currently working two applications in which the applicant has a spouse that is an active duty enlisted member. One couple have a kid and they needed to submit a family care plan along with the application.

Interceptor
09-04-2013, 01:43 PM
Thread closed by member request